couple cooking

Is White Meat Just as Bad for Cholesterol as Red Meat?

Many of us avoid red meat to maintain our low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol level. LDL is can increase your risk of heart disease risk. However, a newly published study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that red and white meat have similar effects on LDL. Before you give up and order steak and cheeseburgers at every meal, let’s take a look at the facts. 

 

Details of the study 

 

Led by scientists at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, the study examined whether cholesterol levels differed after consuming diets high in red meat compared with diets with similar protein levels from white meat or non-meat sources. Non-meat sources high in protein include foods such as nuts, legumes, grains, and soy products. The researchers also examined to see if the saturated fat in each diet affected each participant.

 

The study’s participants were one hundred and thirteen healthy men and women, ranging from ages 21 to 65. The group participated for four weeks by consuming either a randomly assigned high or low saturated fat diet. They also consumed either red meat, white meat, or non-meat food sources. 

 

To reduce the chances that other factors would affect cholesterol levels, participants maintained their typical activity level and abstained from alcohol. They also worked to maintain their weight during the study period and adjusted their calorie intake if their weight changed.

 

Red meat, white meat, or non-meat? 

 

After consuming bot the red and white meat diets, LDL cholesterol was significantly higher compared with the non-meat diet, regardless of whether the diet was high or low in saturated fat. The high-saturated fat diets had a larger harmful effect on LDL cholesterol levels than the low-saturated fat diets, however. High-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol was unaffected by the protein source.

 

Conclusion of the study 

 

Further research will surely ensue as the study had a number of limitations. The number of participants and the duration of the study was small. The study also excluded processed meats such as cold cuts, sausage, or bacon. 

 

It is always best to consult with your physician about what diet is best for you. If you need a physician, please refer to our provider directory. When seeking protein sources yet maintaining a healthy LDL, there are a number of vegetables and legumes such as peas, beans, lentils, nuts and chickpeas to consider. Meat, as with all things, should be consumed in moderation. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

MTNRC Awarded Vohra “Center of Excellence” Certification for Wound Management

Dr. Vandergriff, MD and Mina Donnelly, LPN, Wound Nurse.

Dr. Vandergriff, MD and Mina Donnelly, LPN,
Wound Nurse.

McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has been certified by Vohra Wound Physicians as a Center of Excellence for Wound Management. Only 10% of Vohra’s skilled nursing facility partners have qualified for this annual certification.

MTN&RC places a top priority on healing and rehabilitating their residents to return them to their homes. They admit patients with chronic or complex wounds because they are equipped to treat them with their specialized wound management program.

We have partnered with Vohra Wound Physicians to bring physician-led bedside wound care to our facility. A Vohra wound physician visits our facility weekly to treat our residents with wound and skin issues. This reduces the need to send our residents out to wound care centers or hospitals.

As long as facilities continue to provide more specialized services with complex ailments, the presence of a wound physician is an important link in providing superior care.

Walk to End Alzheimer's Image

More than $5000 raised by McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation for 2019 Walk to End Alzheimer’s

More than 500 residents from Lawton and surrounding communities joined the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday, at Elmer Thomas Park.

McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation’s team raised more than $5,000 for this year’s event to help fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs.

young football player

Football Safety Tips

Many parents have mixed feelings about their children playing contact sports such as football and rightfully so. Injuries in these sports are common. There is nothing you can do to prevent 100% of football injuries from happening. However, from wearing the proper gear to ensuring your child follows certain techniques during practice and on game day, there are many great tips you can follow to prevent a good number of football-related incidents. 

 

Football gear for safety 

If you have the option to purchase your child’s helmet yourself, familiarize yourself with the helmet safety guidelines determined by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE)

Helmets should have a thick layer of padding surrounded by a hard plastic outer shell. They should also have facemasks produced from coated carbon steel that are secured to the helmet. Depending on the position your child plays, his or her coach may recommend a particular type of facemask. Lastly, helmets should be secured with a chin strap and protective chin cup. 

Additionally, all players should have shoulder pads with a hard plastic shell and thick padding. Pants should have padding on the knees, hips, tailbone, and thighs, and all players should wear a mouthguard. Male players should wear an athletic supporter with a cup to prevent testicular injuries.

Each league has its own rules regarding the types of shoes and cleats players can use. 

Other items that you might want to consider include “flak jackets” to protect the abdomen and rib cage, forearm pads, padded neck rolls, and padded or non-padded gloves.

If your child must wear glasses during football, be sure that they’re shatterproof. 

 

Football training tips

During practice, the coach should emphasize safe and fair practices among players. Physical contact should be less during practice including helmet-to-helmet and helmet-to-body contact. He or she should insist on all players wearing the correct protective gear as well. Coaches should teach players proper techniques including how to tackle, how to absorb a tackle, and how to fall safely to the ground when tackled. 

To prevent injuries, take your child for a sports physical before starting a new sport. Remind him to stretch and warm up before playing. Overuse injuries can be avoided by playing different sports throughout the year. 

Ensure your child drinks plenty of fluids before and after games and practices, especially on hot days. 

 

Safe Game Tips 

Discuss the safety rules implemented during practice with your child and following them during games. Encourage your child to not argue with referees and be respectful to everyone. Encourage him to stay calm and let his coach and referee know if another player attempts to injure him on purpose. 

 

 

Lawton Community Health Centers (LCHC) located in Lawton, Comanche, Elgin, Marlow, and Cache communities are available to help with school and sports physicals, verify immunizations are current and discuss any other medical or nutrition concerns with parents. For more information or to make an appointment with one of our LCHC clinics please call our Provider Referral Line at 580.510.7030.

 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

man suffering from head injury

Traumatic Brain Injury: Latest Research, Causes & Treatment

Approximately 2.87 million Americans will receive a traumatic brain injury (TBI) this year. 1 Many think of this as a problem faced by those in combat situations. However, many traumatic brain injuries are due to motor vehicle accidents, falls, and sports injuries. Traumatic brain injury can affect anyone in any season of life. Thankfully, recent research has given us a hopeful look into the future of diagnosing, preventing and treating TBI. 

 

Traumatic brain injury and children 

 

72% of TBIs that occur in childhood are caused by consumer products according to a recent study published in the Journal of Brain Injury. 2 These products include items such as floors, beds, stairs, bicycles, chairs, walls and tables. Injuries during sports such as soccer, football, and basketball are also common causes. 

 

Infants and young children may be unable to communicate possible TBI symptoms. Signs you should watch for include change in eating or nursing habits; sensory problems; irritability;  confusion; persistent, inconsolable crying;  inability to pay attention; change in sleep habits; seizures; sad or depressed mood; drowsiness and loss of interest in favorite activities or toys. 

 

To prevent TBI among children, the study suggested parents improve lighting; remove area rugs; avoid hard surface playgrounds; increase use of safety devices such as stair gates; and use stairway handrails without sharp edges.

 

The latest research in TBI diagnosis 

 

One study tested a new blood test which specifically measures two types of proteins –UCH-L1 and GFAP. 3 These proteins release from the brain and into the blood after the brain receives an injury. This test may be as effective or more so than a CT scan. Researchers are excited that this test could be easily utilized in places where CT scans are not possible such as on the field for the military and in underfunded healthcare facilities worldwide. 

 

The latest research in TBI treatment 

 

A new study involving rats suffering from TBI may lead to promising TBI treatment. 4 Researchers will present their findings at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. Their study reports a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival when injected into the brains of rats with TBI. These researchers hope to regrow new blood vessels in TBI patients to restore oxygen exchange which is reduced after TBI. 

 

 

If you have had a traumatic brain injury, we know that recovery can be extensive. We are proud to offer our team of medical professionals to help you regain a normal life as much as possible. From neurological services to our inpatient rehab facility, we’re here for you! Find a physician today by visiting our online directory.

 

Sources 

1 Center for Disease Control and Prevention.TBI: Get the Facts.  11 March 2019.

2 Journal of Brain Injury. Ali, Bina; Lawrence, Bruce A.; Miller, Ted; and Allison, Jennifer. Products and activities associated with non-fatal traumatic brain injuries in children and adolescents – United States 2010-2013. 29 July 2019.

3 Forbes. Fisher, Nicole. Study Finds New Blood Test Could Help Detect Brain Injury In Minutes. 24 August 2019.

4 American Chemical Society. Peptide hydrogels could help heal traumatic brain injuries. 27 August 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

CCMH Nurses Selected as Finalists for 2019 Oklahoma Nurse of the Year

CCMH Nurses Selected as Finalists for 2019 Oklahoma Nurse of the Year

Congratulations to two of our nurses who have been selected as a finalist in their category for the 2019

Oklahoma March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Awards Gala.

Meagan Garibay was selected as a finalist in the Infection Control category.

Kristen Turner was selected as a finalist in the Surgical Services category.

The Nurse of the Year Awards Gala will be held on Thursday, October 3, 2019 at Riverwind Casino in Norman.

Licensed nurses in Oklahoma that are in good standing with the OK state board of Nursing are eligible. Nominees must exemplify an extraordinary level of patient care, compassion and service.

Nominees are perceived as leaders among peers and in affecting positive change in the profession, workplace and community.

Last year we had six CCMH nurses nominated for the March of Dimes Nurse of the Year celebration; Kate Copass, Barbara Hays, Tarisha Watson, Meagan Garibay, Amy Smith and Paula Griffith were all nominated by their peers last year! (Kate & Amy won in two categories!)

Elvira Webber with Rising Star Award Banner

Rising Star Elvira Webber

Elvira Webber, Business Office Supervisor, goes above and beyond every day in her duties. She shows extreme patience when dealing with patients and family members informing them of their patient liabilities and works diligently to get preauthorization and payer sources in place for them.

Elvira is detail oriented and can multi-task while keeping a positive attitude. She is always willing to help anyone do just about anything and cover for just about everyone when needed so that the residents are taken care of and our facility reputation is upheld. She is able to work under extreme pressure and is able to meet important deadlines and always does this with a kind, caring heart and she is always smiling.

girl wearing contact lenses

Is Your Child Ready for Contact Lenses?

August 19-23 is Contact Lens Health Week! One concern you may have regarding contact lenses is knowing when it is safe for your child to ditch their glasses and begin wearing contacts. There is no perfect age when it comes to your child being contact ready; it is more a matter of maturity. Even babies can wear contacts for certain conditions such as cataracts. If your child is begging to give contacts a try, here are five signs he may be ready. 

 

She brought the idea up

 

This may seem like an obvious reason for readiness. However, a child who asks to get contacts should be more motivated to take care of them himself than a child who did not have the idea until it was mentioned. 

 

He plays sports

 

Contact lenses are a great option for children who participate in sports. Good vision is especially important during sports and children have more options for protective eyewear than with glasses. Additionally, they don’t have to worry about their glasses slipping due to sweat or getting broken glass in their face by accidental impact.

 

She is hygienic and clean 

 

If your child has a love for getting dirty, this is ok. However, it may not be the right time to begin wearing contacts. Unclean contacts add risk for eye infections. 

 

He does chores without constant reminders 

 

No one wants to nag their children to do chores. If you constantly must remind your child to do things, taking proper care of their contacts will be one more thing on this list. If they’re simply not mature enough, contacts can be a great accomplishment in years to come. Contacts may also be a great incentive to mature in the coming months if they’re not acting mature as you know they could.

 

She takes good care of her glasses

 

Don’t assume a child that takes poor care of his glasses will take better care of his contacts. Although there are more opportunities to misplace glasses throughout the day, improper contact care has added health concerns. 

 

One consideration to make is how much easier it is now to take care of contact lenses with daily disposables. Disposables allow you to put in a fresh pair of contacts every day without the need for cleaning regimens or contact solutions. 

Have questions about contacts for your child? Find a CCMH Physician by visiting our provider directory.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Eric Britten holding Rising Star Award

Rising Star Eric Britten

Eric Britten, Desktop Analyst, is always so helpful and willing to answer questions and fix problems with a positive attitude. Even when working on other things, he takes the time to inquire if there is anything else he can do. He makes people feel like their needs are a priority to him. Eric takes the time to not only address and correct the issues that are assigned to him, but also those that aren’t, such as quietly emptying the trash out of offices he was completing a job in. His selflessness, positivity, dedication and hard work are commendable and appreciated! Thank you for all you do, Eric!

school aged child with backpack

Back-to-School Illnesses

Back to school means back to the doctor for many children. It can be very stressful for many families to deal with what seems to be never ending illnesses. School is, unfortunately, a hot spot for viruses and bacteria to flourish including common childhood illnesses that attack immature immune systems of young children. You may already be very familiar with some of the illnesses that commonly spread at school such as the cold or flu. What about other school illnesses like lice or pink eye? Here are 4 common illnesses you may encounter this school year. 

 

Lice 

 

Lice are tiny parasites that feed on your blood. They spread especially easily from schoolchildren through close personal contact and by sharing belongings. It is difficult to completely prevent lice among school children because  they commonly store their items so closely together. 

 

To prevent the spread of lice, encourage your children not to share items. Lice spread through items such as brushes, clothing, headphones, hair decorations, combs, towels, pillows, stuffed toys and blankets.

 

Symptoms of lice include seeing nits in the hair. Nits are the eggs or young form of a louse that attach to human hair. Many  mistake them as dandruff, but unlike dandruff, lice do not brush off easily. Your child may complain of intense itching and have small bumps on the neck, scalp and shoulders. 

 

Nonprescription shampoo that’s specifically formulated to kill lice will usually take care of a lice problem, but you should see your doctor if the shampoo doesn’t kill the lice. 

 

Pink eye 

 

Pink eye (conjunctivitis) is an infection of the transparent membrane (conjunctiva). This membrane covers the white part of your eyeball and lines your eyelid. When small blood vessels in the conjunctiva are inflamed, they are  more visible. This causes the whites of your eyes to be pink or reddish. Pink eye is usually the cause of a viral or bacterial infection.

 

Symptoms of pink eye include a gritty feeling in one or both eyes, itchiness in one or both eyes redness in one or both eyes, tearing and discharge that forms a crust during the night that may prevent your eye or eyes from opening in the morning. 

 

If your symptoms don’t begin to improve within 12 to 24 hours, make an appointment with your eye doctor to make sure you don’t have a more serious eye infection.

 

Pink eye can happen along with colds or respiratory infections such as a sore throat. Wearing contact lenses that aren’t cleaned properly or belong to someone else cause bacterial conjunctivitis.

 

To control the spread, teach your children to wash their hands often, use clean towels and washcloths daily and change pillow cases often. They should avoid sharing these items as well as eye cosmetic and eye care items. During a pink eye episode, be sure to throw away eye cosmetics such as mascara too. 

 

Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease 

 

Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a mild, contagious viral infection. It is spread through bodily fluids. Young children often spread this illness by touching their diaper area during diaper changes or bathroom breaks. 

 

Symptoms include a rash on the hands and feet and sometimes buttocks, fever and painful sores in the front of the throat or mouth. 

 

Practice proper hand-washing and avoid close contact with people who are infected with hand-foot-and-mouth disease to reduce your child’s risk of infection and disinfect common areas often.

 

Contact your child’s doctor if the discomfort keeps your child from properly hydrating or if symptoms worsen after a few days. 

 

Mono 

 

Mononucleosis (mono) carries the nickname of the “kissing disease.” The virus that causes mono transmits through saliva, so you can get it through kissing, but exposure also occurs through a cough or sneeze, or food or drink sharing. Adolescent or young adults most commonly contract mono. Young children usually have few symptoms, however, and the infection often goes unrecognized.

 

Symptoms of mono include sore throat, fatigue, fever, headache, rash and swollen lymph nodes in the neck and armpits as well as swollen tonsils. 

 

If your symptoms don’t get better on their own in a week or two, see your doctor. It’s important to be careful of certain complications such as an enlarged spleen. Rest and adequate fluids are vital to recovery.

 

Is your child in need of pediatric care? Find a pediatrician in our online directory!

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

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