illustration showing person wearing mask incorrectly (not covering nose or mouth) and correctly (covering both nose and mouth) with the words "face masks required to enter"

CCMH Coronavirus Update

CCMH continues to promote a culture of safety and accountability during the COVID-19 pandemic. With the number of new cases in Oklahoma remaining at high levels, it is more important than ever that all people inside the facility are wearing masks.

There is currently no timeline for a vaccine, which means masks will be the “New Normal” in CCMH going forward. Incident Command, Occupational Health, and the Infection Preventionists are meeting weekly to continually discuss the direction of all CCMH activities moving forward. Thank you all for being part of a caring and supporting team during the challenging time!

man with face mask

The Truth about Face Masks

It has been said that we are in a fight against a pandemic as well as a fight against misinformation. Misinformation may even be the bigger fight we face in a world of social media where anyone can easily have a platform and spread information that is not just false, it’s dangerous!

One of the trending topics on social media through the COVID-19 fight is whether or not face masks protect you from the spread of a virus. Some articles even claim wearing a mask is more harmful to your health! In this article, we hope to separate fact from fiction and provide a few tips to help protect you and your family from the virus.

 

How face masks protect from the spread of COVID-19

Can face masks help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus  (COVID-19)? Most certainly, face masks in combination with other preventive measures such as social distancing, help slow the spread of viruses.

You may wonder why then, were face masks not the recommendation at the start of the pandemic? At the time, experts didn’t yet know the extent to which  COVID-19 could spread before symptoms appeared. Nor did we know that some affected persons are asymptomatic. This means that the virus spreads between people interacting in close proximity. For example, vapor droplets spread as individuals speak, cough, or sneeze near each other—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms.

It is also important to remember that we discussed last week that data shows that individuals may not show symptoms for 2-11 days after infection.

 

Should you wear a mask?

These discoveries led the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to recommend face masks for the general public. Some public health groups argue that masks should not be for the general public to protect the supply for health care workers fighting the virus on the “frontlines.”  A critical shortage of surgical masks and N95 masks took place at the beginning of the pandemic. The CDC acknowledged this concern and recommended cloth masks for the public, not surgical and N95 masks our health care providers use. The CDC then updated its guidance to simple cloth face coverings in public to help prevent transmission of COVID-19 by those who may have the virus and not know it.

 

How do different types of face masks work?

N95 masks

N95 masks are actually a type of respirator. They offer more protection than a surgical mask does because it filters out both large and small particles. N95 earned its name because it blocks 95% of very small particles. N95 masks are designed to be disposable. However, research is ongoing to make N95s reuseable.

 

Surgical masks

Also called a medical mask, a surgical mask fits loosely, is disposable, and protects the nose and mouth from contact with droplets that could contain germs. A surgical mask also filters out large particles. Surgical masks help protect others as they reduce exposure to the respiratory secretions and saliva of the mask wearer.

At this time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved any type of surgical mask specifically for protection against the COVID-19 virus, but these masks may provide some protection when N95 masks are not available.

 

Cloth masks

While the supply of N95s and surgical masks is not great, cloth masks are more accessible, reusable, and easy to make out of a variety of materials. Cloth masks still help slow the spread of COVID-19. Cloth masks help protect others in case the wearer has the virus. An N95 mask, on the other hand, helps protect the wearer from getting the virus. However, if we all do our part, the transmission of the virus as a whole is less to all our friends and neighbors.

Countries that quickly implemented rules regarding testing, face masks, isolation, and social distancing early in the pandemic seem to have had some success at slowing the spread of COVID-19. Common sense, of course, is that some protection is better than none. Wearing a cloth face mask loses all of its value, however, if it isn’t combined with frequent hand-washing and social distancing.

Cloth masks are cheap and simple to make. Instructions are easy to find online. Masks can be made from everyday materials, like sheets made of tightly woven cotton. The CDC has published instructions for no-sew masks made from T-shirts and bandanas. Cloth masks should have multiple layers of fabric.

 

How do I wear a cloth face mask?

Wear a cloth face mask when you are in a public place where it is difficult to maintain social distance, especially in “high traffic” places like the grocery store.

 

Pointers for mask placement and removal:

Position the mask over your nose and mouth.
Secure the mask behind your head or use ear loops.
Don’t touch the mask while wearing it.
Wash or sanitize your hands if you accidentally touch the mask.
Untie the mask or lift it off the ear loops without touching your face or the front of the mask.
Immediately wash your hands after removing the mask.
Wash your mask with soap and water in the washing machine after each wear.

 

Face mask safety precautions:

Don’t put masks on anyone who cannot remove the mask without help, has difficulty breathing, or is unconscious.
Use masks only on those age two and older.
Don’t consider face masks as an alternative to social distancing.

 

Have other questions about COVID-19? Visit ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

A Salute to Healthcare Heroes

Flyovers from Altus Air Force Base and Sheppard Air Force Base took place on Friday, May 1, over the Comanche County Memorial Hospital campus.

The first flyover was from Altus Air Force Base as a salute to healthcare workers, first responders and other essential personnel supporting the COVID-19 effort in Oklahoma.

The second flyover was from Sheppard Air Force Base giving a high flying “Thank You” with Operation Spirit over Texoma.

Col. Clayton Bartels, 80th FTW Vice Commander was at CCMH communicating with the lead aircraft.

The 97th AMW and 71st FTW encouraged viewers to tag the bases on social media in photos and videos they captured during the flyovers using #AirForceSalutes, #MobilitysHometown, #VanceProud and #SpiritOverTexoma.

women with covid-19

Do I Need to be Tested for COVID-19?

As new information emerges during the evolving COVID-19 Pandemic, it seems you can find an article with just about any possible symptom pointing to COVID-19. You may begin to wonder, “Do I have COVID-19?” Information you gather from reliable, medically-based sources may be useful. However, research should never replace the assessment of a physician. These are unusual circumstances though. During the time of social distancing when seeking medical treatment may put you more at risk for coming in contact with this novel coronavirus, there are a few questions you can use to self-assess.

 

 

Here are the questions to consider:

 

Do you have any of the following emergency symptoms?

If you have emergency COVID-19 signs and symptoms, such as chest pain or pressure, confusion, trouble breathing, or blue lips or face, seek medical care immediately! A trip to the ER or call to 911 sounds necessary. Let the emergency operator know your symptoms and wear a face covering over your mouth and nose if being transported by ambulance. The phone number for our emergency department is (580) 355-8620.

 

Do you have any of the following symptoms?

New trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or wheezing may all be symptoms that point to COVID-19. Other symptoms include muscle aches, sore throat, diarrhea, loss of smell, change in taste, a cough, and a fever. Generally, patients suffering from COVID-19 have a fever of 100.5 or greater.

 

Consider your contact with others

Have you been within 6 feet of someone with a confirmed case of COVID-19? Did you see him or her for at least 5 minutes, or have direct contact with their saliva or mucus at any point in the past 14 days? Does the person with COVID-19 live with you?

According to the CDC, although we are still learning about how the virus transmits, it is thought to spread mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets. These droplets reach others when the infected person coughs or sneezes. When these droplets land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or the person inhales them into their lungs, they may also become infected.

The incubation period is the time someone comes in contact with the virus until symptoms are present. For COVID-19, the incubation period is typically 2-11 days. To be safe, health professionals are asking patients to consider who he or she has come in contact with within a two week period.

 

If you feel it is possible you may have COVID-19, self isolate if you are not in need of immediate care, and reach out to your medical provider by phone. He or she will advise you how it is best to act.

 

 

Do you have other questions about COVID-19? Check out or resources at ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

COVID-19 travel

Traveling During A Pandemic

Traveling during a pandemic is an unnerving thought. There may be instances that make it unavoidable for you such as going to care for a sick loved one or traveling for an essential work trip. What if you have to enter an area where the virus is spreading rampantly? What if you are in the middle of the spread and don’t even know it? Many concerns probably enter your mind at this time. Having a plan to make your travel as safe as possible will help you feel more in control, decrease any anxiety, and accomplish whatever you need to do.

 

Before travel 

Prepare your immune system. Travel is often stressful under good circumstances, making illnesses possible. Take as good of care of yourself as possible in days before leaving. Take your vitamins, eat well, and get adequate sleep.

Traveling internationally? Ensure you are up-to-date on all vaccines. Research any common health concerns for travel within your destination and have over the counter medications in case these illnesses arise. Know the country’s travel recommendations.

Take hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, and sanitizing spray. Pack as many changes of clothes and essentials in a carryon bag as possible if you are traveling by plane including snacks. This helps limit your need to wander within the airport. In fact, if you can avoid checking a bag, this is even better as it helps limit your time within the airport and the germs you come into contact with.

Also, pack items you would be handed in a drive-thru if you plan on purchasing a meal. Having your own utensils, napkins, kleenex, even toilet paper limits your contact with items others have touched.

Have a plan for what you will do if you get sick. Do you have telemedicine available through health insurance? Do you know which clinics are offering care in your destination area? What is the COVID-19 screening protocol for the area?

Research the latest expectations within your destination city as far as shelter in place orders or expectations while being in public.

 

Driving tips

Take as many items as you can with you to limit your need for stops:

Pack meals, snacks, and bottled water.

Frequently clean often touched areas such as your steering wheel, stereo buttons, and door handles.

 

Flying tips

If you can print your boarding pass and check-in at home, do!

Arrive on time, but try not to spend more time in the airport than necessary.

Avoid sitting in crowded areas at the airport. As departure time draws near, consider moving to a nearby, but less busy gate as people tend to crowd near the gate.

Expect your travel to be interrupted. Have contingency plans in case flights are canceled.

Some good news is that because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily. However, still, remember to practice good hygiene and avoid sitting near those who are coughing or appear sick.

 

When you reach your destination 

Shower as soon as possible. Place the clothes you wore during travel into a sealed plastic bag.

If you’re staying in a hotel, wipe down items that are often skipped by cleaning crews such as door handles, light switches, and TV remotes.

You may be in a less affected area with looser restrictions than your home. However, be considerate. You may be unknowingly bringing the virus to that community!

 

After returning home 

Consider quarantining yourself for 14 days if possible. If you know for sure you have come into contact with those who have COVID-19, DO quarantine yourself for sure!

Take your temperature a couple times a day.

If you need to seek medical care, let the medical provider know you have traveled before arriving at the facility.

 

If you have other questions related to COVID-19, check out our COVID-19 resources page.

 

Source 

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD)

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

coronavirus annoucement

Coronavirus Update

CCMH continues to employ new up-to-date practices in the fight against COVID-19. We have two very exciting announcements! First, CCMH has recently acquired the ability to test for COVID-19 in-house! CCMH is now able to test patients in the ED for COVID-19 before being admitted to the hospital. The chemicals needed to run these tests are very limited, so we are only able to test those patients that need hospital admission. These tests allow for quicker placement of patients, and lets us continue to preserve PPE within the hospital.

Second, CCMH recently partnered with the Mayo Clinic in a clinical trial using COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma for acutely-ill patients. This plasma comes from patients who have already recovered from COVID-19, and contains antibodies that can help fight the virus. The process of using convalescent plasma has been known to the scientific community for decades, but the number of COVID-19 recovered patients has finally gotten high enough to begin collecting this plasma. CCMH is proud to take part in this study and do the most for our patients and the Lawton community.

For more information and the latest updates on COVID-19, you can visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov and www.cdc.gov.

kid with covid 19

FAQS: Covid-19 and Children

You have probably heard that children are less susceptible to COVID-19. However, it is understandable that parents are concerned for their children in regard to a novel virus that we are still learning about. Here is a summary of frequently asked questions parents have asked about the virus based on research provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

 

Should my child wear a mask?

Children 2 years or older should wear a mask or cloth covering over their nose and mouth when in public. Of course, getting a toddler to wear a mask may present a challenge. Having a fabric they choose, letting them “help” make their mask if you make a homemade mask, and explaining that you will wear one too may help.

The CDC recommends wearing a mask in addition to social distancing, NOT in place of social distancing. Remember that the incubation period for the virus is around two weeks in some cases. So even if your child has no symptoms, wearing a covering could protect them from spreading the virus if he or she is asymptomatic.

 

Do children with COVID-19 have different symptoms than adults?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are the same for adults and children. Children, however, usually have milder symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, including cough, fever and runny nose. Some have also reported vomiting and diarrhea.

Parents of children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs should be cautious. We are still learning if certain conditions put children at higher risk.

 

How do I keep my child safe during the COVID-19 outbreak?

Practice the same advice given to adults. Limit your child’s contact with others outside of the home and practice social distancing. Limit your child’s interaction with elder adults and those at high risk as much as possible. Although COVID-19 may be milder for children, children often spread illnesses due to not having a hygiene routine.

Help children to develop a good hygiene routine by observing you. For younger children, you may which to teach them songs about handwashing or show them cartoons about developing a good hygiene routine. Slightly older children may benefit from videos

Children should not be going to playdates and other activities. If you must take your child to daycare because you are required to work outside of your home in an essential business, ensure your daycare is working to maintain your child’s safety at this time. The CDC has given special guidance for how daycare centers should operate during the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

No matter what, try to remain calm and limit your young child’s exposure to media. This is a difficult, confusing time for all of us. Maintaining a happy home and making the most of the situation by creating good memories of this time for children is so important. If you need ideas of how to thrive while isolating, check out this recent article.

 

For more resources on COVID-19, visit: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

working out during COVID-19

Staying Fit in Isolation

Much like the joke that freshman college students gain the “freshmen fifteen” a trending hashtag on social media is #quarantine15. Due to the stress, loneliness, and uncertainty of this time, you may wish to turn to food for comfort and to destress.

 

Passing the time by trying a new recipe, cooking with your significant other or children, or celebrating little blessings with a special dessert at this time, are all great ways to make the most of a stressful situation.

 

Don’t feel guilty if you take a break from the normal routine or gain a few pounds as you try to get a handle on all the difficult emotions you may be facing at this time. However, staying healthy could not be more important than at a time like now.

 

Free home workout options

The easiest way to begin an at-home workout routine is through the guidance of instructor-led videos. Many of these videos require no additional equipment and give you the benefit of being able to pause them to perfect your technique.

Many companies are offering their workouts for free or as an extended trial as COVID-19 runs its course. So there’s no better time than now to try out a new workout and establish a good routine.

Here are a variety of workouts by leading companies in fitness that you can try at this time for free.

 

Peloton

Peloton produces top of the line treadmills and exercise bikes. Their workout app is normally $13 a month. However, Peloton is currently offering a free, 90-day trial. You do not have to own their equipment to use the app. The videos include strength, yoga, meditation, boot camp, and cardio classes. If you’re still able to get outdoors, audio-only classes are available for outdoor running.

 

CorePower Yoga

CorePower shut down their studio and moved to online-only classes that you can stream from their website. New classes are added weekly, including yoga, sculpt, and meditation. The company is offering some free classes while the studio remains closed, but you can also gain access to all of their videos for $19.99 per month.

 

Nike Training Club

Nike Training Club offers an always free workout app with a wide variety of home workouts, including programs that help you set a workout schedule. The app allows you to filter your search results based on the equipment you have available also.

 

Les Mills

If you’ve ever had a membership at a gym, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of Body Pump, a popular class, managed by Les Mills. Les Mills also offers dance, yoga, and boxing, many equipment free classes. All their classes are available on-demand with a 30-day free trial.

 

Amazon Prime Video

If you have an Amazon Prime membership, you already have free access to a library of fitness videos, like Zumba and cardio programs. Just search for “fitness,” then check the “Prime” box in the left sidebar to see what’s available for free streaming.

 

YouTube 

YouTube is a great place to find all sorts of exercise videos. Try something creative like rebounding if you have a trampoline at home or learn some new dance moves. Consider using Fitness Blender, a great library of over 100 free workouts.

 

Basic workout equipment under $100

There is plenty you can do without a single piece of equipment and many of us have financial concerns to consider due to the COVID-19 outbreak. However, if you can afford to invest in some equipment, here is a list of more affordable options which can be ordered via Amazon or various websites. We’ll link to them, but,of course, we cannot guarantee their availability when you read this article:

 

Jump rope

Workout mat 

Dumbbells

Lacrosse ball

Foam roller 

Yoga block

 

Have questions about COVID-19? We’re here for you. Check out ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

coronavirus annoucement

Coronavirus Update

As of last Friday afternoon, we have tested nearly 100 patients. Twelve of those were positive. We continue to utilize 4W and ICU North as our COVID units for patients requiring hospitalization. The state of Oklahoma is rapidly expanding testing capabilities and we expect to see both the number tested and the number of positives go up in the coming weeks. Modeling does not agree on the exact time frame in which we will see our “peak”, but everything agrees this will get worse before it gets better. We are preparing in all the best ways we know how for the potential squeeze on our resources.

We have received many generous donations from our community lately, including donations of upgraded personal protective equipment for bedside staff. We are continuously refining our processes to further protect staff. We are working hard to keep you safe, and we are thankful for your selflessness and bravery in taking care of all patients who need the help only we can provide. We encourage staff to communicate with leadership if they have concerns or questions, so that issues can be addressed and processes can be revised quickly when necessary

CCMH Additional Screening Process Changes

Starting today, outpatient services will close at 4:00pm daily. CCMH has made additional screening process changes for patients coming into the Outpatient Center or Tomlinson Medical Complex entrances for scheduled appointments and services for everyone’s safety. We are asking patients to drive up to either designated entrances to meet with our initial greeters. The greeter will do a general well check on the patient who has a clinic, lab, radiology or outpatient therapy visit. Other visitors will need to stay in the vehicle once parked until the patient’s appointment is finished. Each individual will be given an entry pass, either pink or blue depending on if they’re needing assistance to come into the facility and then their temperature will be taken. The benefits of this screening process is to allow an opportunity for customer service right at the entry point and it helps to regulate unnecessary entry into the facility. We are taking these precautionary measures for the safety of our patients and staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 family washing hands

Could Your Diet Help Flatten the Curve?

COVID-19 seems to be disrupting every aspect of peoples’ daily lives all over the world. Some of us have lost jobs, some are worried about family members who have to continue to work due to being in an essential business, some are worried about family members who may be high risk or separated from us. At times, it feels overwhelming and like there is nothing we can do to fight this invisible enemy. That is not true, however.

 

Hopefully, you are following the guidelines put in place in your community as well as social distancing, washing your hands well and frequently, and sheltering in place as much as possible.

 

Is there more you can do? Yes, there is. You can take the best possible care of yourself during these uncertain times. Doing your best to eat healthy foods could lessen your chances of getting ill, keep you out of the hospital and from infecting others.

 

How do you boost your immunity to help fight COVID-19?

 

Unfortunately, there is no magical food or pill that is guaranteed to boost your immune system and fight off COVID-19. However, a healthy immune system will help. Nutrients that may help the immune response include selenium, vitamins A, C, D, E, B-6, zinc, iron, and folate; with additional potentially promising effects of whole foods like broccoli, goji berry, green tea, and turmeric. Some of these nutrients may help reduce inflammation and protect from tissue damage due to the virus that can lead to lung injury and failure, and even death.

 

It is too early to know what mixture of nutrients is the best to keep Covid-19 at bay. But we do know that several of these nutrients have shown promising effects for flu, common colds, and respiratory infections.

 

Which foods might keep me from getting COVID-19?

 

We know you may not be able to find just anything in the stores right now due to overbuying, but here are some foods that may help boost your immunity: spinach, berries, bananas, citrus fruits, broccoli,  mushrooms, red bell peppers, shellfish, sweet potatoes, peanut butter, almonds, beans, hazelnuts,  turmeric, and tea. Eggs, cheese, tofu, milk, and mushrooms are also great choices.

 

These foods may be especially important for those who are at high risk for contacting COVID-19.

 

Hydration is also important

 

Even mild dehydration can put stress on the body. A good goal is half your body weight in ounces of water. For example, someone who weighs 150 pounds should drink approximately 75 ounces in water. The water from soups, vegetables, and fruits also helps to hydrate the body.

 

Can I take supplements to protect me from COVID-19?

 

There has not been enough time to conduct significant research on natural alternatives to fighting COVID-19. However, some doctors believe that supplements such as elderberry could help. Elderberry has been shown to be effective in treating upper respiratory infections in some studies. However, you should always discuss supplement usage with your doctor. Elderberry may interact with some medications.

 

 

Even if just a small percentage of the population began eating healthier to help ward off this pandemic, think how much it could help our world! Let’s all do our part. We are all in this together!

 

If you have more questions about COVID-19 in Comanche county, visit our resources page: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources/.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

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