CCMH and Healogics Center of Distinction 2020 logos

Wound Care Center Receives Center of Distinction Award

The CCMH Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbarics recently earned the Center of Distinction award, which was given by Healogics®, the nation’s largest provider of advanced wound care services. The Center achieved outstanding clinical outcomes for twelve consecutive months, including patient satisfaction higher than 92 percent, and a minimum wound healing rate of at least 92 percent within 28 median days to heal. There were 601 Centers eligible for the Center of Distinction award and 367 achieved the honor.

“We are fortunate to have an advanced wound care facility in our area. Patients can stay close to home while receiving state-of-the-art care for their wounds,” said Brent Smith, CEO of CCMH. “Our team at Comanche County Memorial Hospital has worked hard to ensure we’re providing the highest quality of care to change the lives of our patients.”

Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbarics is a member of the Healogics network of over 600 Wound Care Centers® and provides access to benchmarking data and proven experience treating approximately 2.5 million chronic wounds. The Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbarics offers highly specialized wound care to patients suffering from diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, infections and other chronic wounds which have not healed in a reasonable amount of time. Leading edge treatments at the Center include negative pressure wound therapy, total contact casting, bio-engineered tissues, biosynthetic dressings and growth factor therapies. The Center also offers hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which works by surrounding the patient with 100 percent oxygen to help progress the healing of the wound.

To be awarded the Center of Distinction, a Center must be conducting the Medical Surveillance Review process per policy and excel in Key Performance Indicators:

  • Patient Satisfaction: Greater than or equal to 92%
  • Healing Rate: Greater than or equal to 92%
  • Outlier Rate: Less than or equal to 16%
  • Median Days to Heal: Less than or equal to 28

Congratulations to The Wound Care Center!

PTSD patients

Do You Think You Have PTSD?

When thinking of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), many think of soldiers. As a proud military community, we cannot deny the fact that PTSD is a troubling problem for those in the military, especially those who have faced the difficulties of combat. In fact, depending on where they served, 11-20% of all veterans experience PTSD. However, statistics also clearly show that PTSD is not just a problem that affects our military.

 

What is PTSD?

After a traumatic experience, sometimes the feeling of sadness, anxiety, and fear do not improve over time. If this is the case, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD may develop following any traumatic event.

PTSD affects people who personally experience the traumatic event, witnesses to the event, and those who assist afterward such as emergency workers and law enforcement officers. No matter the cause, with treatment and support, it is possible to manage your symptoms, reduce the pain of memories, and move beyond the trauma.

 

Statistics about PTSD 

Of the 70% of adults in the United States who have experienced a traumatic event, 20% develop PTSD.

5% of Americans have PTSD at any given time.

1 of 13 people in the U.S. develop PTSD during their lifetime.

1 out of 9 get PTSD at some time in their lives and women are about twice as likely as men to experience PTSD. *

*Statistics gathered from Sidran Institute 

 

How PTSD Occurs 

PTSD is different from person to person because everyone’s nervous system and tolerance for stress is different. While PTSD is likely during the hours or days following a traumatic event, it can sometimes take years before symptoms appear. Sometimes symptoms even appear out of the blue. Other times, they are triggered by a painful reminder of the traumatic event. Examples include an image, certain words, noise, or smell.

 

Symptoms of PTSD

There are four main symptoms of PTSD:

  1. Re-experiencing the traumatic event through flashbacks, nightmares, or memories. This includes intense mental or physical reactions when remembering the trauma.
  2. Avoiding reminders of the trauma. This includes losing interest in activities one was taking part in when the incident occurred and feeling emotionally detached from others.
  3. Hyperarousal is also a common symptom. This includes sleep problems, irritability, hypervigilance, feeling jumpy, and having angry outbursts.
  4. Negative thoughts and difficulty concentrating or remembering. This includes hopelessness, feeling distrust, betrayal, guilt, shame, self-blame.

 

PTSD symptoms in children

For children, especially younger children, the symptoms may include:

  • Fear of separation from their parent
  • Lose of previously-acquired skills such as toilet training
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping
  • Play in which aspects of the trauma are repeated
  • New anxieties and phobias such as fear of monsters
  • Re-creating the trauma through stories, drawings or play
  • Aches and pains without an apparent cause
  • Aggression and irritability

PTSD may also result from surgery when children are too young to fully understand what’s happening to them.

 

If you are struggling to recover from trauma, please reach out to one of our providers today. You can find a list of them at cmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

CCMH and FollowMyHealth logos on image of a man holding a cell phone

New Patient Portal

CCMH announces a new patient portal to safely access and manage your personal medical records!

Being able to access your medical information is an important way to manage your health. CCMH is always striving to make this process easier for you and your loved ones. CCMH is switching to a new patient portal, from RelayHealth to FollowMyHealth as our patient portal of choice starting June 16, 2020.

Any medical records after June 16th will no longer be uploaded by CCMH to our old patient portal (RelayHealth). All new health records and information for care received on or after 06/16/2020 will be available through the FollowMyHealth website and mobile app accessible via https://ccmhhealth.followmyhealth.com

FollowMyHealth will allow you to manage your personal medical records, view test and lab results, set up proxy accounts for children and dependent adults, and make more informed decisions about your health as a CCMH patient.

One of the many great features of FollowMyHealth is that you can download their mobile app, giving you easy 24/7 access on-the-go, making sure you always have your medical information at hand. If you are already a FollowMyHealth portal user, you can request a connection to Comanche County Memorial Hospital by selecting “Connect a Health Source” and choosing Comanche County Memorial Hospital once you have logged in to your FollowMyHealth account.

For more information on FollowMyHealth or setting up an account, please contact CCMH’s Health Information Management (HIM) 580-250-5835.

man with sunglasses

June is Cataract Awareness Month

A cataract occurs when the normally clear lens of your eye becomes clouded. Vision for those with cataracts is similar to looking through a foggy window. This vision change can be difficult. It decreases one’s ability to drive, read, and see the expressions on someone’s face. Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.

When symptoms first occur, glasses and good lighting may help. Overtime, cataract surgery may become necessary. This surgery is generally safe and effective.

 

How does a cataract form?

The lens, where cataracts form, is behind the iris (colored part of the eye). The lens helps to focus light and produces clear images. Over time, or due to medical conditions, the lens breaks down and becomes clouded, thicker, less transparent, and flexible as you age. As the cataract grows, the cloud thickens and covers more of the eye. As light passes through the lens, the cataract blocks light and causes it to scatter, thus, blurring the image.

Cataracts do not develop evenly although they are usually in both eyes causing different vision abilities in each eye.

 

What are the causes of cataracts?

Causes of cataracts include injury, aging, or inherited genetic disorders. Other causes include past eye surgery, diabetes, other eye conditions, or long-term usage of steroid medications.

 

What are the symptoms of cataracts?

Cataracts are a common although unfortunate part of aging. Over time, you may notice the following symptoms:

Cloudy, foggy, filmy, or blurry vision.
Sensitivity to lamps, headlights, or bright sunlight.
Glare (a halo around lights), especially when driving at night.
Prescription changes in glasses which include sudden nearsightedness.
Double vision.
Difficulty reading in lighting that used to be fine.
Poor night vision.
Seeing colors differently than before.

 

When should I see a doctor? 

Changes in visions indicate that you may need to schedule an eye exam. See your doctor immediately if you experience sudden headaches, double vision or flashes of light, or sudden eye pain.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

CCMH Ambulance with blue overlay and "EMS Week" text

CCMH Celebrates Emergency Medical Services Week

EMS Week brings together local communities and medical personnel to honor the dedication of those who provide the day-to-day lifesaving services of medicine’s “front line.” CCMH celebrates these heroes and would like to thank them for their service to our community. This year, CCMH EMS members were asked to reflect on what it means to them to be an EMS practitioner:

“I chose EMS because I wanted to help people. I wanted to be a part of the team that gives people the best chance at surviving the situation they are in. I believe I chose one of the best teams to be a part of.”
Amanda Sheffield, EMT-Basic

“I chose EMS initially as just a job, but it quickly evolved into a passion and a calling to serve others. It has molded and shaped me into the person that I am today.”
Nolan Abner, EMT-Basic

“I wanted to be in EMS to help people and to take care of them. I love helping and taking care of people and this job means everything to me. Holding the hand of someone in the worst moment of their lives, and just being there so they aren’t alone, is the greatest feeling in the world. We make a difference one call at a time. It is bigger than each of us, but together we can accomplish and overcome anything and everything.”
Proud EMT and a Proud Mom of a Medic!
Kimberly Selby-Adrahtas, EMT

“After coming across my grandfather in full arrest and playing a vital part in saving his life, I knew EMS is what I was meant to do. It’s not about recognition or cool lights and sirens, it’s about being there in whatever way possible to help someone.” Meagan Lynch, EMT

“I got into EMS because it’s what I’ve wanted to be since I was a little bitty girl. I love every single thing about this job. I live and breathe EMS and it’s my passion. At the end of the day I couldn’t imagine doing anything else.”
Savannah Marsh, EMT-Basic

“You asked why. I wanted to pay it forward for those who have helped my family. As a dispatcher, I knew I could get help sent to those in need. This service can be redundant and lacks the thrill of a 911 call, but it is one of the greatest services that we do. It is a comfort to family members to know their loved one will be transported safely to their destination.”
Debbie Levick, Ambulance Dispatch

“I didn’t choose EMS it chose me…as a junior in high school, I witnessed a T-Collision. An elderly lady was hurt in the accident; I grabbed her hand and she begged me not to let it go. She looked at me with so much fear in her eyes. I called her husband and family and I stayed till 911 arrived. When I joined the Army I knew my passion was to help people rather than hurt, so I picked a medical MOS. I picked combat medic not knowing I would be good at patient care, compassion and more. EMS fits and flows naturally with me.” Javar Manley, EMT-Paramedic

“I chose to become a paramedic at 12 when a devastated mother rang our doorbell and handed me a lifeless baby and begged me to help him. I did everything I could until help arrived. Being in EMS means you have the chance to be part of someone’s best day when you hand them their newborn baby, or their worst day when they sat alone on a mountain and took their own life and all you can do is touch their face and whisper ‘You are loved and I am so sorry I wasn’t here for you.’“
Marcy Pennington, EMT-Paramedic

“I got into EMS because I want to help as many people as I can. Being in EMS has been the best career path I believe I could have chosen and I can’t wait to further my education even more.”
Ryan Upchurch, EMT-Paramedic

“In an emergency medical situation the patient doesn’t care who you are. Although they may never remember your name, they’ll always remember how you treated them. It’s an honor to give someone a positive experience during a traumatic time one call at a time.”
Leif Johnson, EMT-Basic

“I got into the EMS field after being a part of a volunteer fire department and seeing the good we could do in the community. I love helping people! Kindness and caring is what I try and provide, along with awesome medical care.”
Elizabeth Woods

blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCMH Awarded TSET Grant for Another Five Years

Congratulations to Sandy Foster, Healthy Living Program Director, for successfully writing for and receiving a continuing grant to the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust (TSET).

The five-year grants, renewable annually, will support communities in developing strategies, programs and policies to improve health by preventing or reducing tobacco use, improving nutrition and increasing physical activity in an effort to decrease premature death in Oklahoma. The program prioritizes work in communities where health risk factors – tobacco use, poor nutrition and sedentary lifestyle – are among the highest. The new grant program will begin July 1.

“The coronavirus pandemic has shown that prevention is more important than ever for public health,” said TSET Board of Directors Chair Bruce Benjamin, Ph.D. “Those with underlying conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart or lung disease are more likely to experience serious complications and death from the coronavirus. TSET is investing in building healthier communities in the areas where we see the greatest health disparities.”

The new Healthy Living Program 2.0 program is the second generation of the TSET Healthy Living Program. The new program takes a comprehensive, community approach to health and looks for ways for targeted high-impact interventions.

“This initiative builds on years of success through multiple community based programs funded by TSET. It places a laser focus on communities with the greatest need,” said TSET Executive Director Julie Bisbee.

CCMH has operated this grant for the past 16 years. Great job Sandy!

summer sunglasses

Summer Habits to Establish and Continue All Year

We have had some incredible weather so far this spring! The official first day of summer will be here before you know it! As you are participating in all the outdoor activities of summer, there are many things to remember to help keep you healthier and enjoying during these warmer months. 

 

Here are our 7 summer health tips to implement this summer and the rest of the year as well. Some of us are better at remembering to do these tasks during the summer, but truly these are great tips to remember year-round!

 

Protect your skin

 

The sun’s rays are strongest during the summer months. Your skin is your largest organ and the first line of defense against the elements, so treat it well! However, summer is not the only time to remember sunscreen!  Your skin is still exposed every day. You probably don’t need to apply sunscreen as frequently as a summer day at the beach, but it is still a good idea to remember a little sunscreen daily, no matter the season or weather. 

 

Stay hydrated 

 

 With heat exhaustion and heatstroke serious summer threats, we tend to be more mindful of thirst in the summer. It’s important to stay hydrated, not just when you feel parched in the heat. Once summer passes, you may not feel as parched. Staying hydrated is still crucial to keeping your body at its best, however.

If you struggle with drinking enough water, buy a big jug you can fill up and keep near you all day. You need to drink approximately half of your weight in ounces of water every day.

 

Protect your eyes

 

Sunglasses are more than shade for your eyes and a fashion statement. Without them, you’re at the mercy of harmful UV rays and “blue light.”  This exposure puts you at risk for macular degeneration, cataracts, and eyelid cancer. Furthermore, sunglasses aid with more comfortable and improved vision from not having to squint. Sunglasses just might keep more than just your eyes safe as well. Good vision is especially important when you’re participating in outdoor sports. 

 

Get moving more 

 

Sunny summer days and evenings beckon us outdoors to soak up the sun, but don’t let dreary days in the fall, winter, or spring keep you from getting some exercise. If you have an office job on top of that, it can seem difficult to get moving. Get a fitness tracker to help you make sure you’re getting your steps in around the office or consider getting a standing desk to get you on your feet to keep exercise in focus year-round. 

 

 

Don’t leave swimming to the kids 

 

Swimming is excellent exercise for the entire family. As a low-impact exercise, anyone can do it. Just thirty minutes of light to moderate lap swimming may burn over 230 calories! Unless you are fortunate enough to live in a very temperate climate though, swimming is not enjoyable for much of the year. However, you may have a good indoor swimming pool available. Many gyms do, such as our local Family YMCA

 

Protect yourself from mosquitoes 

 

West Nile and Zika viruses are mosquito bite spread conditions and are no joke! Insect repellants can help. Also, cover exposed skin whenever possible and avoid going outside during dawn and dusk hours when mosquitoes are active. Remember not to scratch when you do get a bite! It will only make the itch worse! 

 

Eat seasonal foods

 

When you think of eating fresh, seasonal veggies and fruits, you probably think of summertime. In summer months, we tend to eat more fruits and veggies because they’re fresh. This can help us stay away from unhealthy snacks. Strawberries and tomatoes may not always be in season, but don’t forget fall superfoods around the corner. Brussels sprouts, pumpkins, and apples can be just as delicious and are also excellently healthy! 

 

If you are in need of a checkup or to find a new provider, summer is a great time to plan to do so when winter cold germs and the flu are lingering. Check out our list of providers at ccmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

CCMH Hospice Volunteer in front of new We Honor Veterans wall

We Honor Veterans

On Friday, CCMH Hospice staff unveiled our “We Honor Veterans” memorial wall. It’s our way of showing appreciation and gratitude to military servicemen and women that devoted their lives to defending our country and freedom and who were patients of CCMH Hospice. The wall display includes portraits of current and former CCMH Hospice patients who served in a branch of the military. We were honored with the presence of Bruce Dwyer, a Purple Heart recipient, who retired from the United States Marine Corps and is a volunteer for CCMH Hospice. “We Honor Veterans” is a program of the National Hospice & Palliative Care Organizations & Veterans Administration that is designed to empower hospice professionals to meet the unique needs of terminally ill veterans. CCMH Hospice team honors our veterans with a certificate of appreciation along with pinning them with an American flag.

men in kitchen

Stroke: a Great Concern for Men’s Health

According to the CDC, stroke is the fifth leading cause of death for men. It kills almost the same number of men each year as Alzheimer’s disease and prostate cancer combined. It is also a leading cause of long-term disability, being more common in men under age 44 than in younger women. Since June is Men’s Health Month, what better time to discuss stroke prevention for men than now!  

 

Although these facts seem concerning, did you know about 4 in 5 strokes are preventable? This prevention starts by knowing your risk for stroke. You can take a self assessment on the National Institute of Health website.

 

What is a stroke?

 

A stroke is a brain attack. It occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. Brain cells that are starved of oxygen die. Stroke is a medical emergency. It’s important to seek care for someone experiencing the signs of stroke right away. Seconds truly do count when a stroke occurs, and the damage to the brain is decreased by quick intervention. 

 

What are the signs of a stroke?

 

Signs of stroke include a drooping face, arm weakness, and slurred speech. Other sudden changes that may indicate stroke include sudden numbness, confusion, difficulty walking, and difficulty seeing. 

 

What risk factors should men know about?

 

Hypertension (high blood pressure)  is a main risk factor for stroke, with about 1 in 3 men having stage 2 hypertension. Stage 2 hypertension is having a blood pressure greater than or equal to 140/90 mmHg). More than half of men with stage 2 hypertension do not have it under control.

 

Other risk factors that are common health problems for men include diabetes, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and obesity.

 

How can stroke be prevented?

 

Healthy lifestyles and keeping health conditions under control are the best methods for preventing stroke. Controlled blood pressure, cholesterol and giving up smoking are all steps in the right direction. Discuss other health conditions or family history with your doctor such as diabetes or heart disease. 

Incorporate healthy foods into your diet such as foods low in salt, or sodium, fruits, vegetables, and foods that are rich in fiber and whole grains. 

 

Learn more about Comanche County Memorial Hospital’s excellence in stroke care at ccmhhealth.com/stroke-care.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

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