Child with black hair receiving vaccine for immunization in shoulder

National Immunization Awareness Month

August marks National Immunization Month, a time when we spread awareness and emphasize the importance of vaccinations against communicable diseases between people of any age. In order to build immunization to a disease or virus, patients of any age receive vaccines to build up the antibodies to resist and fight the disease should it enter later. While it may seem counterintuitive to inject vaccines that contain the same germs that cause disease, the way the body creates antibodies to resist future contractions of the disease is what helps to protect you. These vaccines are filled with cells of the disease that have either been killed or weakened to the point that they don’t make you sick. Some vaccines contain only a part of the disease germ.

 

What makes up a vaccine?

Good question! Vaccines are composed of different ingredients that aid in triggering the body to develop immunity against harmful diseases. These ingredients help ensure that the final immunization product is safe and effective. These include: 

  • Adjuvants help boost the body’s response to vaccines. (Also found in antacids, buffered aspirin, antiperspirants, etc.)
  • Stabilizers help keep vaccines effective after being manufactured (Also found in foods such as Jell-O® and resides in the body naturally.)
  • Formaldehyde is used to prevent contamination by bacteria during the vaccine manufacturing process. It resides in the body naturally (more in body than vaccines. It is also present in the environment, preservatives, and household products.)
  • Thimerosal is also used during the manufacturing process but is no longer an ingredient in any vaccine except multi-dose vials of the flu vaccine. Single-dose vials of the flu vaccine are available as an alternative. No reputable scientific studies have found an association between thimerosal in vaccines and autism.

What Vaccines are Available in the United States?

According to the CDC, the current list of available immunizations in the United States for Adults include: 

 

  • Adenovirus
  • Anthrax
  • Cholera
  • Diphtheria
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Seasonal Influenza (Flu) only
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis
  • Pneumococcal
  • Polio
  • Rabies
  • Rotavirus
  • Rubella
  • Shingles
  • Smallpox
  • Tetanus
  • Tuberculosis
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Varicella
  • Yellow Fever

 

The Impact of Vaccinations Worldwide

 

Immunizations currently save approximately 2-3 million deaths per year. Vaccines prevent deaths every year in all age groups from diseases like diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), influenza, and measles. It is one of the most successful and cost-effective public health interventions. 

 

One of the most well-known vaccine successes over the years is that of the Meningitis A vaccine. Since it’s introduction to healthcare facilities for administration in 2010, mass vaccination campaigns have led to the control and near elimination of the deadly meningitis A disease in 26 African “meningitis belt” countries. The vaccine is now being integrated into routine national immunization programs.

 

Side Effects of Immunizations

 

While vaccines are an option for many, some may choose to opt-out due to potential side effects. These side effects are truly dependent on each individual’s response to the administration and extreme, long-lasting side effects are noted to be extremely rare. Most commonly reported side effects include nausea, fatigue, or a rash at the site of injection. Patients may also experience muscle and joint aches, chills, or a mild fever soon after the injection. These do subside after a short period of time. These side effects typically indicate that your body is reacting to the vaccines positively and is beginning to build immunity against the disease.

 

If you Choose Not to Vaccinate…

 

While vaccines are always optional, the medical community highly recommends them. You should, however, know the potential risks of not vaccinating your child and learn about the possibilities of them catching diseases from people who may not have any symptoms. Remember! You can’t always tell who is contagious.

If you choose not to vaccinate any members of your family, know you are responsible to follow these guidelines:

  • Inform your child’s school, childcare facility, and other caregivers about your child’s vaccination status.
  • Notify the doctor’s office, urgent care facility, ambulance personnel, or emergency room staff that your child has not been fully vaccinated. They need to consider the possibility that your child may have a vaccine-preventable disease so that they can treat your child correctly as quickly as possible.
  • Isolate your child so disease during an outbreak does not spread to your child and others especially infants too young for some vaccines.
  • Look up the countries where you will travel on the CDC travelers’ website before traveling. Travelers are exposed to diseases during travel or by others returning to the U.S.

If your child is in need of immunizations, please make an appointment with Lawton Community Health Center.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While we frequently update our content, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

References:

The CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niam/index.html

The WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/immunization

The CDC Basics: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/vpd-vac-basics.html

Vaccines.gov: https://www.vaccines.gov/basics/safety/side_effects

LCHC employees showing box of foods donated at their food drive

LCHC Celebrates National Health Center Week

Lawton Community Health Center (LCHC) has served the residents of Comanche County and surrounding counties since January 2008.

In addition to providing family practice and pediatric services to individuals with Medicaid (SoonerCare), Medicare, and private insurance, LCHC provides healthcare to those residents who do not have health insurance. Care is provided on a sliding fee schedule. Patients are required to provide proof of income to ensure they receive discounts for which they are eligible.

There are 13 convenient locations across southwest Oklahoma including clinics in Burns Flat, Cache, Comanche, Elgin, Lawton, Marlow, and Medicine Park (coming soon.)

blurred health center waiting room with purple overlay

LCHC Celebrating National Health Center Week, August 9-15

Lawton Community Health Center (LCHC) has served the residents of Comanche County and surrounding counties since January 2008.

In addition to providing family practice and pediatric services to individuals with Medicaid (SoonerCare), Medicare, and private insurance, LCHC provides healthcare to those residents who do not have health insurance. Care is provided on a sliding fee schedule. Patients are required to provide proof of income to ensure they receive discounts for which they are eligible.

There are 13 convenient locations across southwest Oklahoma including clinics in Burns Flat, Cache, Comanche, Elgin, Lawton, Marlow, and Medicine Park (coming soon.)

Yellow Dot Program Launch

First Responders and Lawton Community Leaders launched the first Yellow Dot program in Oklahoma on Thursday. 25,000 dots and forms are making their way into the community. The program is sponsored by Lawton Community Health Center and BancFirst, and is FREE to everyone. Pick up your packet at one of the locations listed, complete the form, attach your picture, put the form in a zip lock baggie and put it in your glove box. Then attach the Yellow Dot to the back window of your vehicle. That’s it! If you are in a car accident, first responders will see the Yellow Dot on your back window and know to look in the glove box for your medical information. Having this crucial information during the first hour following a traumatic event could be the difference between life and death. Get your Yellow Dot packet here at CCMH today!

What is Oklahoma Yellow Dot?

The “Yellow Dot” Program is a free service. It helps save lives during a car crash by alerting first responders to a yellow decal on the driver’s side rear window. The decal signals first responders to check in the glove compartment for the corresponding “Yellow Dot” form. This form contains crucial emergency information to help the victim.

Oklahoma Yellow Dot helps citizens of all ages in the event of a car crash or other medical emergency. It improves communication between first responders and car accident victims at a time when victims may be unable to communicate for themselves.

OK Yellow Dot is currently in Comanche County and other surrounding counties. The program is sponsored by Lawton Community Health Centers and BancFirst.

You can pick up your Oklahoma Yellow Dot window cling and form at: Lawton Community Health Center locations, BancFirst branches and CCMH Front Desk.

Please go to our Facebook page and like our page Oklahoma Yellow Dot. For more information, please visit our website: www.okyellowdot.org.

school desk

Back-to-School Checkups for Children

School supplies, backpacks, new clothes and shoes may be on parents’ to-do list to get kids ready for the first day of school, but also important is scheduling a wellness checkup with a primary care provider to make sure kids are healthy and ready to learn.

 

Lawton Community Health Centers (LCHC) located in Lawton, Comanche, Elgin, Marlow and now Cache communities are available to help with back-to-school and sports physicals, verify immunizations are current and discuss any other medical or nutrition concerns with parents.

 

LCHC clinics provide convenient hours and locations to meet your family’s needs.  Some of our services include…

  • Primary Health Care
  • Dental Services with referral
  • Mental Health Services – Counseling (Child/Adolescent/Adult)
  • Diabetes and Nutrition Services with referral

 

LCHC provides family practice and pediatric services to individuals with Medicaid (SoonerCare), Medicare, and private insurance.  LCHC also provides healthcare to those residents who do not have health insurance on a sliding fee schedule. Patients are required to provide proof of income to ensure they receive discounts for which they are eligible.

 

For more information or to make an appointment with one of our LCHC clinics please call our Provider Referral Line at 580.510.7030.

 

The following health and safety tips are from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). 

 

Here are some things to think about before the school year starts.  Being prepared and ready-to-go can help get the new school year off to a good start.

 

MAKING THE FIRST DAY EASIER

  • Parents should remember that they need not wait until the first day of class to ask for help. Schools are open to address any concerns a parent or child might have, including the specific needs of a child, over the summer. The best time to get help might be one to two weeks before school opens.
  • Point out the positive aspects of starting school to create positive anticipation about the first day of class. They will see old friends and meet new ones. Talk with them about positive experiences they may have had in the past at school or with other groups of children.
  • Consider starting your child on their school sleep/wake schedule a week or so ahead of time so that time change is not a factor on their first couple of days at school.
  • Find another child in the neighborhood with whom your child can walk to school or ride on the bus.
  • Many children become nervous about new situations, including changing to a new school, classroom or teacher.  This may occur at any age. If your child seems nervous, it can be helpful to rehearse entry into the new situation. Take them to visit the new school or classroom before the first day of school. Remind them that there are probably a lot of students who are uneasy about the first day of school. Teachers know that students are nervous and will make an extra effort to make sure everyone feels as comfortable as possible. If your child seems nervous, ask them what they are worried about and help them problem solve ways to master the new situation.
  • If it is a new school for your child, attend any available orientations and take an opportunity to tour the school before the first day. Bring the child to school a few days prior to class to play on the playground and get comfortable in the new environment.
  • If you feel it is needed, drive your child (or walk with her) to school and pick her up on the first day, and get there early on the first day to cut down on unnecessary stress.
  • Make sure to touch base with your child’s new teacher at the beginning or end of the day so the teacher knows how much you want to be supportive of your child’s school experience.

 

BACKPACK SAFETY

  • Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.
  • Pack light. Organize the backpack to use all of its compartments. Pack heavier items closest to the center of the back. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your child’s body weight.  Go through the pack with your child weekly and remove unneeded items to keep it light.
  • Remind your child to always use both shoulder straps. Slinging a backpack over one shoulder can strain muscles.
  • Adjust the pack so that the bottom sits at your child’s waist.
  • If your school allows, consider a rolling backpack. This type of backpack may be a good choice for students who must tote a heavy load. Remember that rolling backpacks still must be carried upstairs, they may be difficult to roll in the snow, and they may not fit in some lockers.

 

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Cache Community Health Center Now Accepting Patients

LCHC Cache Clinic Now Open – Accepting New Patients

Lawton Community Health Center is proud to announce the opening of a new clinic in Cache, Oklahoma. The clinic is the result of a huge demand for additional services in area communities to meet the needs of the under served and improve healthcare opportunities for rural residents in Cache. Access to quality healthcare is critical for rural communities in which they reside. LCHC Cache, will provide services for all ages including adult and pediatric primary care.

The new clinic is located at 512 C Avenue in Cache, Oklahoma. For more information or to make an appointment, contact LCHC Clinic at 580.699.7361.

Kimberly Brunty Receives Rising Star Award

Kimberly Brunty Receives Rising Star Award

Kimberly Brunty (LCHC Case Mgr) recently received the RBC Rising Star Award for her outstanding work in patient care and supporting team values. On multiple occasions, Kimberly has helped staff from other departments with patient issues like denture replacement, rides to OKC for vision appointments, and financial assistance. These are all things that case managers do, but Kimberly does them for everyone and always with a smile. She doesn’t just do her job, she goes above and beyond to make our families feel cared for. Several families have stated that she makes a difference in their care and that they would not know what to do without her.

Kimberly’s actions not only show the character of the staff that work for us but they show that she is willing to always take the extra time to get to know our patients and provide that individualized care that makes such a difference.

LCHC 10 Year Anniversary

Celebrating National Health Center Week – August 12-18

Lawton Community Health Center is celebrating their 10 year anniversary this week. There will be several events taking place all week at each clinic such as patient appreciation day, gourmet popcorn, kids coloring contest, staff appreciation day, snow cones, barbecue, ice cream social and group exercises. On Wednesday all of the staff will be dressed in their favorite Super Hero costumes. So be sure to visit your local clinic, participate in the events and there will be giveaways for everyone.

National Health Center Week 2018 (NHCW) provides an opportunity to visit a Community Health Center and see firsthand why they are now at center stage in a changing health care landscape. This past year, Congress, with strong bipartisan support, invested in health centers, recognizing that a strong community-based system of care where people have easy access to doctors and preventive care will save lives and reduce health care costs.

Health centers like ours in Comanche, Elgin, Lawton and Marlow are part of a nationwide network that is the family doctor to more than 27 million Americans. Our mission to provide affordable options for primary care is well established. What may be lesser known is that we are proven innovators and problem-solvers in treating chronic disease. We look beyond medical charts not only to prevent illness but also address the factors that actually cause poor health, such as poverty, homelessness, substance use, mental illness, lack of nutrition, and unemployment.

“We are happy to be able to provide quality care to this community and throughout Comanche County. Since inception we have provided more than $1.3 million in sliding fee adjustments to make healthcare affordable” said Sean McAvoy, LCHC Executive Director.