Woman with celiac disease hunches in discomfort grasping stomach

5 Natural Gluten-Free Foods for Celiac Disease

September 13th marked Celiac Disease Awareness Day. 1 in 100 people worldwide have Celiac Disease. Celiac Disease is a serious autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. People with Celiac Disease will often experience discomfort, pain, and reactions to foods containing gluten. They could even become hospitalized if the reaction is extreme. Gluten Intolerance can also cause discomfort, nausea, bloating, and other symptoms. This indicates your body has a tough time digesting gluten and wheat products.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a protein found in most grains, especially those that are processed prior to arriving on the shelf for consumption. The most commonly known foods containing gluten include those made with wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). These can cause serious health problems or other sensitivities, especially in the digestive tract. So with gluten being in many common household pantry items, what can people with Celiac Disease count on as natural foods that do not contain gluten? The following list is a good starting point to build a pantry full of natural, gluten free foods.

Steel Cut Oats

Many people with Celiac Disease and a Gluten intolerance steer clear of breakfast staples like pancakes and french toasts. But luckily, your favorite oatmeal is still on the table. Dress this breakfast bowl up with cinnamon, apples, bananas, or strawberries, all naturally gluten free!

Brown Rice

For those who are missing their favorite starchy foods like bread and pasta due to gluten intolerance, Brown Rice is an excellent go-to to satisfy those cravings. This grain is a great source of vitamin B3, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, manganese, phosphorus, and iron. This is an excellent carb source for active individuals and athletes who may not be able to cook up a batch of spaghetti before a big day of activity.

Quinoa

Quinoa is also known as a super grain. It may be confused as a gluten-containing food based on its category as a naturally grown grain. But Quinoa is safe to eat for those with Celiac as it does not contain gluten. Prepared much like rice, this grain is an excellent source of fiber and protein. Have with salt and pepper, or toss with your favorite shredded *gluten-free* cheese. 

Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and Vegetables are the golden child of a gluten free diet. Filled with antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and other naturally occurring ingredients that serve our bodies in all the right ways, feel safe reaching for that apple or banana. Another vitamin-packed snack is Broccoli. Dip in a gluten-free hummus for added flavor. Just be sure to check your labels to ensure any dipping sauces are marked “gluten free” or “wheat free”. Also, be sure to check any canned, frozen, or freeze dried fruit and vegetables, as these may contain additives that could contain traces of wheat or other forms of gluten.

Potatoes

Straight from the ground, these starchy power foods are an incredible way to satisfy hunger and provide you with vitamins. Dress them up with sour cream and chives for a decadent side dish. 

Other gluten free foods include most dairy products, nuts, and chickpeas. For any food you may have questions about, be sure to check the labels on your food before eating, or ask a healthcare professional. If you are having any symptoms or signs of Celiac Disease or develop allergies to common foods, contact your CCMH provider to discuss treatment options and nutritional advice.  

 

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

Sources:

Celiac Disease Foundation: https://celiac.org/about-celiac-disease/what-is-celiac-disease/

Nuts.com/healthyeating: https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/gluten-free-foods?gclid=Cj0KCQjwtZH7BRDzARIsAGjbK2ay8nGkxExhZdYWIa-3CKOz4e4wGbKuqtslKhR-xCE76e4HVLu6YwsaAiRrEALw_wcB

The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/gluten-free-diet/art-20048530

Healthline: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/gluten-free-foods

young women ovarian cancer risk

This Common Symptom of Ovarian Cancer is Often Overlooked

A lack of awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms may have serious consequences for some women.

 

What is ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a type of female reproductive cancer that begins in the ovaries. Women typically have two ovaries, one on each side of the uterus. The ovaries are about the size of an almond. They produce eggs and important hormones- estrogen and progesterone.

 

Statistics about ovarian cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, each year in the U.S., over 21,000 women receive their diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Nearly 14,000 also die from the disease annually. The risk of developing the disease increases with age and is about 1 in 78. Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women, accounting for the most deaths over any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

 

Why is ovarian cancer often overlooked?

According to the Mayo Clinic, one of the major concerns regarding ovarian cancer is that it often goes undetected until it reaches the belly and pelvis. At later stages, ovarian cancer is more difficult to treat and more likely fatal.

Ovarian cancer is also often asymptomatic in the early stages. Later stages have noticeable symptoms, but they can be non-specific, such as loss of appetite and weight loss.

 

Which symptom of ovarian cancer do women overlook?

A study led by researchers in the U.K. of a non-profit organization, Target Research, discovered that many women are likely to miss a common ovarian cancer symptom and change their diet other than visit their doctor. Common symptoms of ovarian cancer include always feeling full, persistent bloating, stomach pain, and needing to urinate more.

The organization surveyed more than 1,100 women. How did women respond to hypothetically experiencing bloating?

  • 34% said they would visit their doctor if regularly experiencing bloating.
  • 50% said they would consider dietary changes. These changes include removing dairy or gluten or adding probiotic yogurt.
  • 43% said they would Google their symptoms.
  • 23%  said they would purchase over-the-counter medications.
  • 22% said they would exercise more.

A previous survey by Target Research found that only 20% of women identified bloating as a symptom of ovarian cancer.

 

Other common symptoms of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer was once thought of as a “silent killer.” That changed in the 1990s however when research revealed catching early symptoms and beginning treatment can greatly improve a patient’s outcome. Besides the mentioned symptoms, other potential symptoms include nausea, fatigue,  menstrual changes, pain during sex, back pain, and constipation.

 

If you experience any of the symptoms above, do not delay in reaching out to your CCMH Provider.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While we frequently update content, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

breastfeeding mom

Help the Environment by Breastfeeding Your Baby

August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week!  Over 120 countries recognize this impactful week for moms and babies.

It is widely recommended by physicians and health care authorities that mothers exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first six months of life and continue to breastfeed while introducing solids during the second half of the first year of life.

Breastfeeding has incredible health benefits for both moms and babies. However, an often-overlooked benefit is breastfeeding’s positive impact on the environment. There’s no better time than now to discuss it though. The theme of World Breastfeeding Week for 2020 is “Support breastfeeding for a healthier planet!”

 

How does breastfeeding impact the environment? 

Breastmilk is the most nutritionally balanced food for your baby. Breastmilk contains no preservatives, processing, or risk of contaminants.

In a way, breast milk is a renewable resource and saves energy! When feeding directly from the breast, there is no need to warm milk. You supply the perfect ingredients for your baby at just the right temperature!

Breastfeeding also reduces waste. It only requires the mom and baby’s body to make it happen! Bottles and formulas require a lot of packaging to produce, promote, and recycle. Therefore, breastfeeding is most efficient to reduce waste and save energy.

 

How does pumping breast milk affect the environment? 

Some moms prefer to pump instead of feed directly on the breast. This may be so others can feed baby while mom is away or due to issues with baby’s latch on the breast. A breast pump requires additional gear and storage products. However, it’s still more friendly to mother earth than formula feeding. Many products needed to pump are also reusable.

Upon the completion of a breastfeeding journey, some manufacturers also have a recycling program for their breast pumps.

 

If you are a mom who was able to breastfeed and did, we thank you! You have played a part to positively impact our planet and create a healthier society.

 

Learn about CCMH’s breastfeeding support provided to moms and babies through our “baby-friendly” designation.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

newborn sleeping next to CCMH and Baby-Friendly USA logos

Comanche County Memorial Hospital Re-Designated as a “Baby-Friendly” Hospital

Comanche County Memorial Hospital is proud to announce it has achieved the highly prestigious international Baby-Friendly ReDesignation after a rigorous review process conducted by Baby-Friendly USA, the organization responsible for bestowing this certification in the United States.

This distinguished honor demonstrates that CCMH’s Women’s & Children’s Department is adhering to the highest standards of care for breastfeeding mothers and their babies. These standards are built on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, a set of evidence-based practices recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) for optimal infant feeding support in the precious first days of a newborn’s life.

“CCMH has long been a recognized leader in the care of women and newborns,” said Brent Smith, CEO. “This designation is a tribute to our commitment to ensuring that every woman who delivers a baby at our facility is given the resources, information and support needed to help her and her baby get the best, healthiest start in life.”

The positive health effects of breastfeeding are well documented and widely recognized by health authorities throughout the world. For example, the Surgeon General’s 2011 Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding stated that “Breast milk is uniquely suited to the human infant’s nutritional needs and is a live substance with unparalleled immunological and anti-inflammatory properties that protect against a host of illnesses and diseases for both mothers and children.”

CCMH joins a growing list of more than 20,000 Baby-Friendly hospitals and birth centers throughout the world, 604 of which are in the United States. These facilities provide an environment that supports breastfeeding while respecting every woman’s right to make the best decision for herself and her family.

people on crowded beach

Zika Impact on 2019 Summer Travel

In 2015 and 2016 especially, pregnant women or those hoping to conceive faced the Zika virus. This mosquito borne illness spreads mostly through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. These mosquitoes live in tropical, subtropical, and some temperate climates. They are also the main species of mosquito that spread other illnesses such as dengue and chikungunya.

 

Why Zika is a concern for women 

 

Zika passes from infected men to women during intercourse. Zika may also pass from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause an increased risk of pregnancy loss and severe birth defects such as microcephaly. Microcephaly is a condition that causes a smaller than normal head and developmental issues. 

 

How does Zika spread? 

 

Because the Aedes mosquitoes live near and feed on people, they are more likely to spread the virus than other mosquitoes. The CDC estimates that this mosquito can thrive within the majority of the U.S. states and countries throughout the world. Given this great range, completely avoiding Zika risk is impossible although there are certain precautions travelers can take to avoid the illness. 

 

What is the current risk for Zika worldwide?

 

No country is currently reporting a Zika outbreak. However, the CDC’s most recent stance regarding the illness is that “Zika continues to be a problem in many parts of the world.” 1 Those pregnant or planning a pregnancy should take precautions. 

 

What should pregnant couples or couples trying to conceive do to prevent Zika?

 

The CDC recommends that pregnant women should avoid traveling to any area during a Zika outbreak. Even though no countries are experiencing an outbreak at this time, it is also recommended that pregnant women or those planning to conceive in upcoming months talk to their health care provider to weigh the risks before travel. 

 

The CDC also recommends men who are exposed to the virus use condoms throughout their partner’s pregnancy. If a man is exposed and planning a pregnancy, trying to conceive should be delayed and condoms should be used for three months. 

 

Have concerns about Zika? Reach out to a CCMH Provider via our online directory at CCMHhealth.com/Directory.

 

Source

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Zika Travel Information. 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. CCMH does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the CCMH website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

woman_standing_in_field

Coping with Endometriosis

March is National Endometriosis Awareness Month! If a doctor has diagnosed you with endometriosis, you know how painful experiencing this condition can be. However, we have a few tips you can try to help minimize your discomfort and not let endometriosis get in the way of enjoying your life!

 

What is endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis is a disorder that affects 200 million women worldwide. 1 When a woman has endometriosis, tissue that behave like the lining of the uterus grow outside the uterus. This tissue grows in various places including the fallopian tubes, pelvic lining, ovaries, and in or around the bowel and bladder.

 

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

 

Painful cramps and periods
Periods that are long
Heavy menstrual flow
Nausea and/or vomiting
Pain during sex
Infertility
Bowel and urinary disorders
Chronic fatigue

 

Managing endometriosis

 

Your  physician may recommend various medications and treatments for endometriosis. However, there are some things you can do yourself to help better manage your condition.

 

Diet

 

Add more fruits and vegetables to your diet and minimize your red meat intake. Some studies indicate that increased red meat consumption may greatly increase your chance of suffering from endometriosis while fruits and vegetables can help reduce your chances.  Consuming omega-3 fatty acids found in fish such as  mackerel, sardines, salmon and anchovies can also help.

 

Manage stress

 

Cortisol is a hormone involved in the stress response. Prolonged stress can lead to elevated cortisol levels, a hormone which may decrease progesterone levels. This hormonal imbalance may aggravate endometriosis.

 

Apply Heat

 

A warm bath or heating pad placed on the lower abdomen can help to relax cramping pelvic muscles and reduce pain. Many women may find using heat as effective as pain relievers.

 

Pelvic massage


Some women find relief when being treated by a massage therapist. Massage therapy can help reduce menstruation pain associated with endometriosis. Massaging the pelvic area, including parts of the abdomen, back and sides  shortly before the menstrual period begins is the most beneficial time to seek massage treatment.

 

Rest

 

Especially during menstruation, sufferers of endometriosis should get more rest. Lying on the side with the knees pulled to the chest can help reduce pain and pressure in the back.

 

Exercise

 

Regular exercise helps to release endorphins, the “feel good” hormones that reduce pain. Exercise can also help to lower estrogen levels and improve symptoms.

 

Manage Nausea

 

When pain related to endometriosis is at its worst, women may experience nausea. Ginger is often used to help nausea. Many women drink ginger tea or eat ginger chews.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of endometriosis or need help coping with your endometriosis diagnosis, make an appointment with one of our providers at MMG Gynecology and Obstetrics.

 

Sources

 

1 Endometriosis Foundation of America. What Is Endometriosis? Causes, Symptoms and Treatments.


Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.