Mom and child in red jackets playing in fall gold and orange leaves

Stay Healthy This Fall Season

Fall is upon us and that means changing temperatures, autumn colors, and the inevitable cold and flu season. With less time spent outdoors in the open air, it is typical for most people to find themselves in their homes surrounded by loved ones more often. While this fall will look a little different due to limits and restrictions for outings due to COVID-19, people are still susceptible to the common fall illnesses that float around during this time of year.

Want to stay healthy and strong this fall? Here are seven ways to boost your health, and mood, this Autumn.

  1. Stay Moving

    With colder temperatures arriving, it may seem easier to find an excuse to skip your morning walk or run due to colder temperatures. The truth is, even if it is colder out, moving your body and keeping your exercise routine up and “running” will help ward off certain illnesses. Add an extra layer and don’t forget your hat and gloves when the temperatures really drop. Hop on your bike or lace up your shoes and go.

  2. Brush your teeth and wash your hands

    Your mouth is one of the most bacteria-holding locations on your body. Be sure to clean those pearly whites and around your gums to protect your oral health. While at the sink, be sure to wash your hands as often as possible. Count to 20 while scrubbing, or sing your favorite song. This is one of the most effective ways to prevent contracting illnesses.

  3. Get plenty of sleep

    A no brainer. The Mayo Clinic recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for active adults. With adequate amounts of sleep, your body is able to successfully conquer tasks like muscle repair, memory consolidation and release of hormones regulating growth and appetite.

  4. Eat healthy, fresh in-season Fall fruits and vegetables

    Fall means some of our favorite foods are now more available in larger quantities due to a better growing environment and temperatures. Some of these vegetables include Apples, Bell Peppers, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Parsnips, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, and Winter Squash.

  5. Drink plenty of water and non-caffeinated fluid

    Caffeine is a diuretic, depleting your body of water. We need at LEAST 1/2 of our body weight in ounces of water a day for our body to focus on its primary functions. This will help flush toxins out of your body and provide your muscles and organs (especially your brain) with more energy to take on the everyday.

  6. Refrain from using Tobacco

    Tobacco products introduce a great number of harmful chemicals to your body. As a result, your body uses energy and toxin-eliminating functions to concentrate on removing these chemicals. This leads to less energy for functions dedicated fighting off sickness and germs that simultaneously enter your body.

  7. Get your Flu shot

    With the dangers of contracting COVID, it’s especially important to get your seasonal flu shot. This prepares your body to ward off the flu. If you receive your flu shot and begin contracting flu-like symptoms, this may indicate another health issue. Your doctor may wish to test for other viruses to help narrow down the problem, which could in turn help with recovery time.

 

Fall means change and a lot of it. Be sure to practice good self-health in order to avoid illness and have a safe, enjoyable autumn. If you have any questions about seasonal wellness or flu-like symptoms, contact your CCMH provider to set up an appointment today.

 

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Sources:

The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/how-many-hours-of-sleep-are-enough/faq-20057898

The Sleep Foundation: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-happens-when-you-sleep

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/healthy-fall.htm

 

CCMH Nurses Selected as Finalists for 2020 Oklahoma Nurse of the Year

2020 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Finalists Announced

CCMH is proud to announce that we have 9 finalists for the March of Dimes Nurse of the Year. This is the most finalists we’ve ever had at one time. Winners will be announced in October. Good luck and we are proud of you!

And the finalists are…

Courtnie Alberry-Minnear, RN, BSN
Emergency

Melissa Alvillar, RN, BSN, RNC-OB, CRCST
Nursing Administration

Debbie Cofer, RN, CPHQ
Quality & Risk Management

Meagan Garibay, RN, BSN, CIC
Infection Control & Occupational Health

Paula Griffith, RN, BSN, RNC-OB, NE-BC
Nursing Management

Lana Jackson, RN, BSN, CEN
Emergency

Heather Love, RN, MSN, CPHRM
Quality & Risk Management

Jennifer Renner, RN, BSN, CNOR
Surgical Services

Torres Schlitte, RN, BSN, CNOR, CRCST
Other Nursing Specialty

Woman with celiac disease hunches in discomfort grasping stomach

5 Natural Gluten-Free Foods for Celiac Disease

September 13th marked Celiac Disease Awareness Day. 1 in 100 people worldwide have Celiac Disease. Celiac Disease is a serious autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. People with Celiac Disease will often experience discomfort, pain, and reactions to foods containing gluten. They could even become hospitalized if the reaction is extreme. Gluten Intolerance can also cause discomfort, nausea, bloating, and other symptoms. This indicates your body has a tough time digesting gluten and wheat products.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a protein found in most grains, especially those that are processed prior to arriving on the shelf for consumption. The most commonly known foods containing gluten include those made with wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). These can cause serious health problems or other sensitivities, especially in the digestive tract. So with gluten being in many common household pantry items, what can people with Celiac Disease count on as natural foods that do not contain gluten? The following list is a good starting point to build a pantry full of natural, gluten free foods.

Steel Cut Oats

Many people with Celiac Disease and a Gluten intolerance steer clear of breakfast staples like pancakes and french toasts. But luckily, your favorite oatmeal is still on the table. Dress this breakfast bowl up with cinnamon, apples, bananas, or strawberries, all naturally gluten free!

Brown Rice

For those who are missing their favorite starchy foods like bread and pasta due to gluten intolerance, Brown Rice is an excellent go-to to satisfy those cravings. This grain is a great source of vitamin B3, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, manganese, phosphorus, and iron. This is an excellent carb source for active individuals and athletes who may not be able to cook up a batch of spaghetti before a big day of activity.

Quinoa

Quinoa is also known as a super grain. It may be confused as a gluten-containing food based on its category as a naturally grown grain. But Quinoa is safe to eat for those with Celiac as it does not contain gluten. Prepared much like rice, this grain is an excellent source of fiber and protein. Have with salt and pepper, or toss with your favorite shredded *gluten-free* cheese. 

Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and Vegetables are the golden child of a gluten free diet. Filled with antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and other naturally occurring ingredients that serve our bodies in all the right ways, feel safe reaching for that apple or banana. Another vitamin-packed snack is Broccoli. Dip in a gluten-free hummus for added flavor. Just be sure to check your labels to ensure any dipping sauces are marked “gluten free” or “wheat free”. Also, be sure to check any canned, frozen, or freeze dried fruit and vegetables, as these may contain additives that could contain traces of wheat or other forms of gluten.

Potatoes

Straight from the ground, these starchy power foods are an incredible way to satisfy hunger and provide you with vitamins. Dress them up with sour cream and chives for a decadent side dish. 

Other gluten free foods include most dairy products, nuts, and chickpeas. For any food you may have questions about, be sure to check the labels on your food before eating, or ask a healthcare professional. If you are having any symptoms or signs of Celiac Disease or develop allergies to common foods, contact your CCMH provider to discuss treatment options and nutritional advice.  

 

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

Sources:

Celiac Disease Foundation: https://celiac.org/about-celiac-disease/what-is-celiac-disease/

Nuts.com/healthyeating: https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/gluten-free-foods?gclid=Cj0KCQjwtZH7BRDzARIsAGjbK2ay8nGkxExhZdYWIa-3CKOz4e4wGbKuqtslKhR-xCE76e4HVLu6YwsaAiRrEALw_wcB

The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/gluten-free-diet/art-20048530

Healthline: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/gluten-free-foods

Blue graphic with a white DNA strand behind human head with red frontal lobe of brain indicating dementia

Dementia or Alzheimer’s? What’s the difference?

We’ve all heard of the terms Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Unfortunately, they are all too prevalent words in the human vocabulary as we begin to talk about aging and signs of cognitive deterioration, but the distinction between the two can sometimes be a difficult subject to understand. They are most common in aging Individuals 65 or older. People with Dementia experience a decrease in cognitive functions such as reasoning, memory and critical thinking.
Alzheimers is a degenerative brain disease in which cells in the brain break down and can impact memory and behavior. While these sound similar, there is a difference between Dementia and Alzehimer’s.

What is Dementia?

People with Dementia experience a progressive decrease in cognitive functions such as reasoning, memory and critical thinking. Dementia describes a group of symptoms associated with a decline in memory, reasoning or other thinking skills. Many different types of dementia exist and many conditions cause it, meaning that Dementia is not a normal part of aging. Dementia is a result of damage to brain cells that affects peoples’ ability to communicate, which can affect thinking, behavior and feelings.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “Alzheimer’s is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by complex brain changes following cell damage.” In addition, Alzheimer’s is actually a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms eventually grow severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease experience a great deal of difficulty due to confusion and inability to complete thoughts. Alzheimer’s impacts the ability to draw memories together in a complete sequence.

Early onset Alzheimer’s and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Alzehimer’s is most commonly seen in adults aged 65 years or older, however, it can also impact younger individuals. These individuals may experience Mild Cognitive Impairment early on in life that leads to a full diagnosis of Alzheimer’s later in life. Because it is so common for older men and women to be diagnosed with Alzehimer’s, a younger person with early onset is more likely to be misdiagnosed, therefore leading to a mistreatment and lack of support for the condition. Because of this. it’s important to be aware of the symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment and monitor its
progression.

If you are concerned about you or a loved one experiencing any signs of cognitive impairment at any age, visit your trusted CCMH Provider. For more  information about CCMH Silver Lining Geriatric Psychiatric Care, call us today.

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical
advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any
services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any
links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website
does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the
medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information
may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions
or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Sources:
Identify Alzheimer’s Disease Earlier: https://www.identifyalz.com/
Alzheimer’s Association: https://www.alz.org/alzheimer_s_dementia
Alzheimer’s Association: https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers
The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-
depth/alzheimers/art-20048356

Giving to the Community & Community Support

CCMH Employees with Lawton Food Bank Director in food storage facility

From the left: Charmain Baldwin, the Lawton Food Bank Director, and Mitchell Spaulding.

Giving to the Community

The Business Services Office had a food drive this month and donated 283 pounds of food to the Lawton Food Bank! “We are so happy to have been able to bless someone,” said Mitchell Spaulding.

 

BancFirst employees and CCMH nurses with mask strap extenders

From the left: Waheed Gbadamosi, BancFirst; Melissa Alvillar, CCMH Nursing; Tara Deavours, Bancfirst.

Community Support

We are so very grateful to BancFirst who donated 500 mask strap extenders to nursing on Friday, September 11, 2020. These mask extenders will help our front line workers protect their ears.

3D COVID-19 virus with "Community COVID Antibody Testing" text

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Wednesday, September 23rd
6am–4pm

Thursday, September 24th
8am–5pm

Comanche County Memorial Hospital
Outpatient Center Resource Room
110 NW 31st Street • Lawton, OK

Call 580-585-5406 to RSVP

$30, no fasting blood draw
NO CREDIT CARDS
CASH OR CHECK ONLY

Free for CCMH Employees

dark haired suicidal woman receiving hug from while male with beard

National Suicide Prevention Week

During the week of September 6th-12th, Americans recognize Suicide Prevention month with hopes to spread awareness of the prevalence of Suicide in your community. This week is dedicated to sharing ideas of how to care for those who are struggling with suicidal thoughts and provide outlets and resources for help.

Every 40 seconds, one person commits suicide in the United States. That equates to 800,000 people a year who take their own lives. In the state of Oklahoma alone, suicide is the 9th leading cause of death for all people; it is the 2nd leading cause for people ages 10-34. For every suicide, there are approximately 25 attempts. With numbers this staggering, it is important family members, coworkers, and friends are aware of the warning signs for suicidal thoughts in the people we are surrounded by. The following list of risk factors raise our awareness of who may be of higher risk. 

Risk Factors

Every suicide is different and is typically a result of different risk factors. These risk factors may include:

  • History of a mental health problems, especially clinical depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Family history of suicide
  • Family history of child maltreatment or abuse
  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • History of alcohol and substance abuse
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Impulsive or aggressive tendencies
  • Cultural and religious beliefs (e.g., belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma)
  • Local epidemics of suicide or graphic, sensationalized accounts of suicide
  • Isolation, a feeling of being cut off from other people
  • Barriers to accessing mental health treatment
  • Relationship or intimate partner conflict
  • Stressful life events (death, divorce, job loss, legal trouble)
  • Prolonged stress (harassment, bullying, chronic pain, homelessness)
  • Easy access to lethal methods, including firearms and drugs
  • Unwillingness to seek help because of the stigma attached to mental health and substance abuse disorders or to suicidal thoughts

Protective Factors

It can be difficult to notice when someone may be close to taking their own life. If you suspect someone is contemplating suicide, you can help locate or provide these Protective Factors to provide support and potentially prevent a suicide attempt:

  • Support of family, friends and others (counselors, managers, etc.)
  • The presence of an intimate, supportive partner
  • Church attendance and participation in religious activities
  • Religious coping (prayer, worship, meditation, Scripture, meeting with spiritual leaders, etc.)
  • Moral and spiritual objections to suicide
  • Moral and spiritual sense of responsibility to family, God, etc.
  • Beliefs that aid survival or coping with trials such as “I am loved,” “I am not alone,” and “I can overcome.”
  • Problem solving skills and ability to regulate one’s own emotional response
  • Personal strengths such as persistence, resilience, hope, etc…
  • Family cohesion

Prevention

Ultimately, suicide can be a difficult topic to discuss with anyone. If you or a loved one are struggling with coping with external factors that induce suicidal thoughts, remember help and support are here for you. Ways to help prevent suicide include:

  • Strengthen economic supports such as housing stabilization and household financial security.
  • Strengthen access and delivery of care including mental health care and insurance
  • Create protective environments with reduced access to lethal means and excessive alcohol.
  • Promote connectedness with peer norm programs and community engagement
  • Teach coping and problem-solving skills.
  • Identify and support those at risk with possible crisis intervention and re-attempt prevention courses.

Whether you or someone you know is at risk for suicide, know that there is help and support available. You are cared for and not alone. If you do wish to speak to someone about your current mental health needs, your CCMH Providers are here to help as we all navigate these challenging times. 


Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/suicide/fastfact.html

Helping Prevent Suicide: A Three-Part Series from Chaplain Paul Gore (PDF)

3D COVID-19 virus with "Community COVID Antibody Testing" text

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Wednesday, September 23rd
6am–4pm

Thursday, September 24th
8am–5pm

Comanche County Memorial Hospital
Outpatient Center Resource Room
110 NW 31st Street • Lawton, OK

Call 580-585-5406 to RSVP

$30, no fasting blood draw
NO CREDIT CARDS
CASH OR CHECK ONLY

Free for CCMH Employees

Child with black hair receiving vaccine for immunization in shoulder

National Immunization Awareness Month

August marks National Immunization Month, a time when we spread awareness and emphasize the importance of vaccinations against communicable diseases between people of any age. In order to build immunization to a disease or virus, patients of any age receive vaccines to build up the antibodies to resist and fight the disease should it enter later. While it may seem counterintuitive to inject vaccines that contain the same germs that cause disease, the way the body creates antibodies to resist future contractions of the disease is what helps to protect you. These vaccines are filled with cells of the disease that have either been killed or weakened to the point that they don’t make you sick. Some vaccines contain only a part of the disease germ.

 

What makes up a vaccine?

Good question! Vaccines are composed of different ingredients that aid in triggering the body to develop immunity against harmful diseases. These ingredients help ensure that the final immunization product is safe and effective. These include: 

  • Adjuvants help boost the body’s response to vaccines. (Also found in antacids, buffered aspirin, antiperspirants, etc.)
  • Stabilizers help keep vaccines effective after being manufactured (Also found in foods such as Jell-O® and resides in the body naturally.)
  • Formaldehyde is used to prevent contamination by bacteria during the vaccine manufacturing process. It resides in the body naturally (more in body than vaccines. It is also present in the environment, preservatives, and household products.)
  • Thimerosal is also used during the manufacturing process but is no longer an ingredient in any vaccine except multi-dose vials of the flu vaccine. Single-dose vials of the flu vaccine are available as an alternative. No reputable scientific studies have found an association between thimerosal in vaccines and autism.

What Vaccines are Available in the United States?

According to the CDC, the current list of available immunizations in the United States for Adults include: 

 

  • Adenovirus
  • Anthrax
  • Cholera
  • Diphtheria
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Seasonal Influenza (Flu) only
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis
  • Pneumococcal
  • Polio
  • Rabies
  • Rotavirus
  • Rubella
  • Shingles
  • Smallpox
  • Tetanus
  • Tuberculosis
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Varicella
  • Yellow Fever

 

The Impact of Vaccinations Worldwide

 

Immunizations currently save approximately 2-3 million deaths per year. Vaccines prevent deaths every year in all age groups from diseases like diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), influenza, and measles. It is one of the most successful and cost-effective public health interventions. 

 

One of the most well-known vaccine successes over the years is that of the Meningitis A vaccine. Since it’s introduction to healthcare facilities for administration in 2010, mass vaccination campaigns have led to the control and near elimination of the deadly meningitis A disease in 26 African “meningitis belt” countries. The vaccine is now being integrated into routine national immunization programs.

 

Side Effects of Immunizations

 

While vaccines are an option for many, some may choose to opt-out due to potential side effects. These side effects are truly dependent on each individual’s response to the administration and extreme, long-lasting side effects are noted to be extremely rare. Most commonly reported side effects include nausea, fatigue, or a rash at the site of injection. Patients may also experience muscle and joint aches, chills, or a mild fever soon after the injection. These do subside after a short period of time. These side effects typically indicate that your body is reacting to the vaccines positively and is beginning to build immunity against the disease.

 

If you Choose Not to Vaccinate…

 

While vaccines are always optional, the medical community highly recommends them. You should, however, know the potential risks of not vaccinating your child and learn about the possibilities of them catching diseases from people who may not have any symptoms. Remember! You can’t always tell who is contagious.

If you choose not to vaccinate any members of your family, know you are responsible to follow these guidelines:

  • Inform your child’s school, childcare facility, and other caregivers about your child’s vaccination status.
  • Notify the doctor’s office, urgent care facility, ambulance personnel, or emergency room staff that your child has not been fully vaccinated. They need to consider the possibility that your child may have a vaccine-preventable disease so that they can treat your child correctly as quickly as possible.
  • Isolate your child so disease during an outbreak does not spread to your child and others especially infants too young for some vaccines.
  • Look up the countries where you will travel on the CDC travelers’ website before traveling. Travelers are exposed to diseases during travel or by others returning to the U.S.

If your child is in need of immunizations, please make an appointment with Lawton Community Health Center.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While we frequently update our content, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

References:

The CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niam/index.html

The WHO: https://www.who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/immunization

The CDC Basics: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/vpd-vac-basics.html

Vaccines.gov: https://www.vaccines.gov/basics/safety/side_effects

headshot of woman with blonde wavy hair on a blue swoosh background, text reading "Melissa Alvillar Promoted"

Melissa Alvillar Promoted

Melissa Alvillar started her career in healthcare as a CNA in 2002 in California. She worked as a CNA in Long Term Care, then transitioned to Acute Care work when she started her LPN program. Once she completed her LPN program, she moved to Oklahoma where she worked in Women’s Services, Med/Surg, and ICU units in Chickasha.

At that time, Melissa wanted to become a labor nurse and obtain her Registered Nurse license. She continued on with her education and received her Associates Degree in Nursing at Oklahoma City Community College. Seeing the advantages of a BSN for career advancement she went back to school and obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing at SWOSU.

“As an RN, I have spent the majority of my career in Labor and Delivery, which I loved! I have worked in Labor and Delivery, NICU, Post Partum, 2 North and 2 South,” said Melissa. “In 2016, I was asked to help cover a room in the OR due to a nursing shortage. Like normal “fill in jobs”- one day turned into 2 months!” Then she was offered the Surgical Services Manager Position which included the Operating Room, Recovery Room, GI lab, SPD, Surgicare, PAT, and Infusion Services. (Chris Ward, Chief Nursing Officer, says he loves developing leaders!)

Melissa spent two years as the Manager in Surgical Services and almost 2 years as the Director of Surgical Services. She developed a love that she never even thought she would have for the Surgical Services and the people in the departments! “What a fantastic group of hard working, detail orientated, and passionate people they are!” said Melissa.

In March 2020, Melissa was offered the Interim Director of Nursing Operations role while she still continued as Director of Surgical Services. Recently she accepted the full time position as Administrative Director of Nursing Operations. She is currently enrolled in classes to obtain her MSN.

“I love being a nurse and I love nursing here at Memorial. I am learning so much about the different units and what great people we have working here! We have an amazing team and I am so excited to be a part of it. I have a true passion for people and the relationships we build. I believe I am approachable and love to hear our staff member’s input and ideas. I am so appreciative of the opportunities I have been given to be a part of Nursing and moving forward here at Comanche County Memorial Hospital!” said Melissa.

Please join us in welcoming Melissa to her new role!

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