Alan Riddle, Project Manager with IT receives his yearly flu shot during our Annual Flu Vaccination and PPD Clinic.

International Infection Prevention Week — October 13 – 19

The 2019 theme for the International Infection Prevention Week is Vaccines are Everybody’s Business.

There are many different germs inside and outside of the healthcare setting. These germs spread in many different ways. For example, germs can spread from person to person and from objects to people. To stop germs from infecting people, healthcare professionals, patients and families need to work together to stay healthy.

It takes a chain reaction of events for infections to spread to others. The way to stop germs from spreading is by interrupting the chain. When you go into a hospital or other healthcare setting to receive care, you become vulnerable to catching infections. But the good news is that patients, their families and visitors can take steps to prevent infections by simply knowing the top infection prevention basics.

• Speak up for your care

• Keeping your hands clean

• Ask about safe injection practices

• Ask to have your room or equipment cleaned

• Ask questions about your medications

• Ask about vaccines you need to stay healthy

• Become familiar with healthcare-associated infections

 

mom and daughter on bench

Your Breast Cancer Risk as You Age

The American Cancer Society has named  breast cancer as the most common type of cancer among American women other than non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States battle breast cancer at some point during their lifetime. 

 

Typically, we think of diseases such as breast cancer a problem experienced among older women.  It is true that as you age, your chance of developing breast cancer also increases. However, women may develop breast cancer at any age. 

 

In this article, we will examine the impact age has on breast cancer. 

 

At what age do most women receive their breast cancer diagnosis? 

 

Women over the age of 50 are more likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis. In fact, the median age for this diagnosis is 62 years 1 old with most doctors giving a breast cancer diagnosis to women between the age of 55 and 64.  As we age, abnormal changes in cells are more likely to occur.

 

What is the risk for each age group? 

 

The SEER Cancer Statistics Review annually assess the risk of a woman developing breast cancer during her lifetime. According to the SEER, the risk that an American  female develops breast cancer within the next 10 years is:

 

0.44% at age 30

1.47% at age 40

2.38% at age 50

3.56% at age 60

3.82% at age 70 2

 

What age were women who received a breast cancer diagnosis in recent years? 

 

The SEER report showed 437,722 women received their breast cancer diagnosis in between 2012 and 2016. Of these women: 

 

1.9% were  20–34 years old

8.4% were 35–44 years old

20.1% were 44–55 years old

25.6% were 55–64 years old

24.8% were 65–74 years old

13.7% were 75–84 years old

5.6% were 84 years and older 

 

Certain lifestyle choices may help prevent breast cancer such as your physical activity level and alcohol consumption. However, many factors can affect a person’s risk of developing breast cancer cannot be controlled, such as family history and age. 

 

Early diagnosis is key to treating breast cancer and keeping it from spreading to surrounding tissue and other parts of the body. If you are a woman age 40 or older, it is important to undergo a mammogram annually. Learn more at ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/

 

Resources 

 

1 Susan G. Komen. Breast cancer in women. 13 May 2019. 

 

2 National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). April 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

2019 March of Dimes “Nurse of the Year” Winner and Finalist

Left: NURSE OF THE YEAR WINNER – Surgical Services: Kristen Turner, BSN, RN, CPAN Right: NURSE OF THE YEAR FINALIST – Infection Control: Meagan Garibay, RN-BSN, CIC

Congratulations to Kristen Turner, RN, for winning Oklahoma March of Dimes Nurse of the Year in the Surgical Services category!

For the second year in a row, CCMH has had March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Winners in different categories and several nurses selected as finalists.

CCMH is proud to have two outstanding nurse finalists in two different categories for 2019.

Meagan Garibay, RN-BSN, CIC, was selected as a finalist in the Infection Control category.

Kristen Turner, BSN, RN, CPAN, was selected as a finalist in Surgical Services and won in that category.

Nurses are recognized in an array of nursing categories. Exceptional nurses employed in the state of Oklahoma are eligible. A selection committee of health care professionals review the confidential nomination forms.

The awards were presented October 3rd at the Annual Oklahoma March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Gala in Norman.

NURSE OF THE YEAR WINNER – Surgical Services: Kristen Turner, BSN, RN, CPAN

NURSE OF THE YEAR FINALIST – Infection Control: Meagan Garibay, RN-BSN, CIC

cooking with onion and garlic

Garlic and Onion Consumption May Prevent Breast Cancer

A recent study held in Puerto Rico took a look at onion and garlic consumption and the effect these vegetables have on breast cancer. The results may be very positive for some women.

 

About the study 

 

Onions and garlic are part of the same plant family as chives, leeks and other species. Not only are they well-loved by many due to their rich flavor, but these vegetables may have disease-fighting characteristics.  Some evidence also links them to curing diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes.

 

In regards to cancer, multiple studies have examined diet and breast cancer risk. In summary, these studies discovered that the more of these vegetables individuals consumed, the lower their risk of developing various cancers became.

 

A team of researchers decided to look at the diets of women in Puerto Rico and compare their breast cancer risk. The team chose Puerto Rico for two reasons. Puerto Rico has lower breast cancer rates in comparison with the mainland U.S. A largely consumed condiment of Puerto Rico, “sofrito,” is also made mainly of onion and garlic.

 

The researchers published the results of the study in the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

 

How the researchers gathered data

 

Using clinical and hospital records, the team discovered 314 women who were breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2014. The women were between the ages of 30 and 79.  The study also included 346 control participants.

 

To join the control group, participants could not have had cancer with the exception of nonmelanoma skin cancer.  A  food frequency questionnaire told the researchers about dietary habits including onion and garlic consumption, and specifically the sofrito consumption of each participant.

 

The team adjusted their findings for factors such as body mass index, education, age, history, and smoking status to name a few.

 

Astounding findings 

 

The research team discovered that Sofrito consumers who ate it twice or more daily had a 67% lower breast cancer risk. The research team suspects that the flavonols and organosulfur compounds in onions and garlic may help prevent cancer. Specifically, the diallyl disulfide, S-allylcysteine, and diallyl sulfide in garlic and the alk(en)yl cysteine sulphoxides in onions have shown anticarcinogenic properties in studies involving humans and animals.

 

Although encouraging, the study did have the limitations of a small group of participants. The group of non-onion and garlic consumers was too small for comparison. Also, no standard Sofrito recipe exists. Sofrito is often homemade and includes additional ingredients such as tomatoes, bell peppers, black pepper, and cilantro.

 

Regardless, these results are encouraging to onion and garlic consumers hoping to eat a diet that may help prevent breast cancer.

 

Interested in learning about cancer care available right here in Lawton? Check out The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma!

 

Resource

 

1 Taylor & Francis Online. Gauri Desai, Michelle Schelske-Santos, Cruz M. Nazario, et al. Onion and Garlic Intake and Breast Cancer, a Case-Control Study in Puerto Rico.  12 August 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

sugary drinks

Sugary Drinks May Increase Risk of Cancer

Linking sugary drinks to health problems is not new. The list of conditions sugary drinks may contribute to includes type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.

 

Previous studies have observed that the added sugar in soft drinks may fuel tumor growth and spread cancer in rodents. New research explores this relationship between sugar and cancer.

 

Details of the study

 

The research team observed various forms of cancer in 101,257 French adults. The average age of the patients was 42.

 

The types of drinks consumed included milk-based sugary drinks, syrups, soft drinks,  100% fruit juices and fruit drinks,   sports drinks, and energy drinks.

 

The research also included artificially-sweetened drinks such as sugar-free syrups, diet soft drinks, and diet milk-based beverages.

 

The study also included data gathered from food questionnaires, recording around 3,300 different kinds of foods and drinks. The participants were also observed for up to 9 years.

 

Other factors associated with cancer were considered such as sex, age, hereditary risk of cancer, education, smoking, and exercise.

 

An increased risk of breast cancer 

 

Throughout the follow-up period of the study, 2,193 people developed cancer for the first time.  693 of the cases involved breast cancer, 291 cases were prostate cancer and 166 involved colorectal cancer.

 

The study revealed that with a daily increase of 100 milliliters in sugary drink consumption, the risk of cancer rose by 18%, and the risk of breast cancer increased by 22%.

 

Diet drinks did not increase cancer risk. The participants who consumed diet drinks did so in small quantities, so researchers recommended interpreting this information with caution.

 

An analysis of the study

 

The researchers believe that sugary drinks can raise cancer risk because the sugar affects blood sugar, visceral fat, and inflammatory markers. All of these which previously correlated with higher cancer risk.

 

The number of participants is a strength of the study as well as the information that the researchers gathered.

 

However, the findings may not be well-representative of the general population, as the study did not represent the wider population well. There were more women with health-conscious behaviors and higher educational levels than the general population. This could have resulted in an even lower cancer incidence in comparison with national estimates.

 

 

CCMH is proud to offer cancer care right here at home. To learn about the Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, visit their website at www.ccswok.com.

 

Source 

Thebmj. Sugary drink consumption and risk of cancer: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort. 10 July 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Dr. Richard Brittingham receiving Bronze Star Award

Richard T. Brittingham, MD Receives Bronze Star

On Friday, September 20, Colonel Richard T. Brittingham, U.S. Army, Retired was presented with the Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V” for his heroic actions while serving as a U.S. Marine during Combat Operations in the Republic of Vietnam in 1968. The presentation was held at the Marine Detachment Parade Field, 913 Randolph Road, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Dr. Richard Brittingham has been an internal medicine physician at CCMH for 26 years. Congratulations!

hand on vape

Vaping: Myths and Truths

There is an outbreak of lung injury from e-cigarette use or vaping. As of Septemeber 17th, the CDC reports 530 cases of lung injury due to the use of e-cigarette or vaping products across the US and its territories. The CDC also reports seven deaths from complications due to vaping across six different states. 1

The CDC said, “No consistent e-cigarette or vaping product, substance, or additive has been identified in all cases, nor has any one product or substance been conclusively linked to lung disease in patients.” 1

There is much we do not yet know about the effects of vaping, and that unknown causes much fear nationwide. Let’s shed some light on what we do know at this time. 

 

Myth #1: Nicotine is the only chemical in vapes.

There is more to vaping than just nicotine. Vaping is a very popular method of marijuana use. Some individuals even vape herbs. 

This is especially dangerous because there is not a standard among the types and amounts of chemicals in vaping products. This has also made it difficult to discover the exact harms of vaping. Each user’s experience is different due to different flavors, nicotine levels, and devices. 

 

Myth #2: Nicotine causes cancer. 

Nicotine is not a carcinogen. The other chemicals in tobacco products such as formaldehyde and lead, for example, cause cancer. Vape products don’t have these additives which has lead to the false belief that vaping is perfectly safe. 

Nicotine is highly addictive, raises blood pressure, and can harm developing adolescent brains. 

 

Myth #3: Vape products are safe because they don’t burn tobacco.

Clearly nicotine itself is not safe, nor is vaping harmless. There are all kinds of things you consume when you vape, many which are not regulated or well understood. 

So just what do you inhale while vaping? You get nicotine. Nicotine comes from tobacco, and this is why e-cigarettes are a tobacco product. You also get the solvents, the flavors and heavy traces of metal exposure from the heating coil, as well as other tobacco metabolites. 

 Secondary concerns include the potential for harder drug use and the mental effects of addiction and dependence. Addiction and nicotine use are closely associated with other health disorders such as depression, stress, and anxiety. Depressions individuals may be more likely to abuse substances. These substances may lead to additional feelings of depression. 

 

Truth #1: Vaping is an epidemic among our youth. 

Although not everyone who vapes is a young person, there is a strong culture of vaping among teens and the slightly older Gen-Z adults. Vaping is cleverly marketed as the new thing in smoking, it’s new technology, and it is customizable with trendy colors, flavors, and sleek devices. There is an obvious appeal to it among the younger crowd, complete with the lie for parents that it’s safer than cigarettes. 

 

Truth #2: Not everyone is aware of the dangers of vaping. 

The US government, schools, and health organizations do an amazing job of informing our youth about the dangers of smoking cigarettes. Facts and media to inform youth of the harms of the vaping trend, however, are still catching up. 

The medical community is fighting to catch up to this fast-growing trend. Research takes time.  Until we have evidence which provides clear results for specific vaping regulations, the real dangers of vaping and e-cigarette remain concerningly unknown. 

 

If you need help to break an addiction to nicotine or tobacco products, please reach out to one of our providers. You can find them on our CCMH Provider Directory.

 

Source

1 Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Outbreak of Lung Injury Associated with E-Cigarette Use, or Vaping.19. Sept. 2019.

 

Disclaimer  

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

High school girls in hospital gowns

Local High School Students Volunteer for HazMat Training

A total of eight local high school students from Lawton High, Lawton Christian, Elgin and Apache volunteered to go through the decontamination process. They changed into shirts and shorts and then were decontaminated as if someone was actually exposed to a dangerous chemical. This gave the team members the opportunity to practice their decon skills and to practice with their equipment.

MTNRC Awarded Vohra “Center of Excellence” Certification for Wound Management

Dr. Vandergriff, MD and Mina Donnelly, LPN, Wound Nurse.

Dr. Vandergriff, MD and Mina Donnelly, LPN,
Wound Nurse.

McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has been certified by Vohra Wound Physicians as a Center of Excellence for Wound Management. Only 10% of Vohra’s skilled nursing facility partners have qualified for this annual certification.

MTN&RC places a top priority on healing and rehabilitating their residents to return them to their homes. They admit patients with chronic or complex wounds because they are equipped to treat them with their specialized wound management program.

We have partnered with Vohra Wound Physicians to bring physician-led bedside wound care to our facility. A Vohra wound physician visits our facility weekly to treat our residents with wound and skin issues. This reduces the need to send our residents out to wound care centers or hospitals.

As long as facilities continue to provide more specialized services with complex ailments, the presence of a wound physician is an important link in providing superior care.

Walk to End Alzheimer's Image

More than $5000 raised by McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation for 2019 Walk to End Alzheimer’s

More than 500 residents from Lawton and surrounding communities joined the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday, at Elmer Thomas Park.

McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation’s team raised more than $5,000 for this year’s event to help fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs.

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