worst foods for heart

10 Foods That Destroy a Healthy Heart

February is Heart Month. There’s no better time to make a decision to keep your heart and cardiovascular system healthy for years to come than right now! Here are 10 foods that you should save for occasional treats or find healthy swaps whenever possible: 

 

Deep-fried foods

Fried snacks, fried chicken, French fries, etc.  increase your risk of heart disease. Conventional frying methods create trans fats. Frans tats are a type of fat that raises bad cholesterol and lowers good cholesterol. 

If you crave fried foods, look for alternative recipes. Examples include recipes that bake, air fry or use healthier oils. Many of these recipes also use mock “vegetable” versions or alternate batters. 

 

Cured and processed meats 

Meats such as sausage and bacon are often high in saturated fat. Even low-fat options, however, tend to be very high in sodium. A few thin slices of deli meat may have half your daily recommended amount of salt! 

High sodium intake is linked to high blood pressure, and avoiding extra salt can greatly improve it. 

 

Fast-food burgers

Saturated fats may contribute to heart disease, their relationship isn’t entirely clear. In general, however, saturated fats from animals, especially in combination with carbohydrates, appear to have a negative effect on heart health. Fast- food restaurants tend to use lower quality ingredients as well as unhealthy cooking methods. Avoiding them is a good way to be kind to your heart. 

 

Candy

Diets high in added sugar may help contribute to inflammation, obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

 

Juices and soft drinks

Check your beverage labels carefully. Many soft drinks and juices contain a ridiculous amount of sugar!

 

Diet soda

You would think the fat-free and zero-calorie version of your favorite soft drink may be a good solution. It may be fat-free and zero-calorie, however, some research suggests that the chemicals in diet soda may alter gastrointestinal bacteria. Altered gut bacteria makes people more prone to weight gain. 

 

Pastries and cookies

Baked goods, especially commercially produced ones, are full of sugar. They also likely contain saturated fats or trans fats.

 

Sugar filled cereals 

Like drinks, breakfast cereals often contain sugar. The consumption of refined carbohydrates and sugars in the morning produces inflammation. This in return makes blood sugar go up and down, increasing sugar cravings throughout the day.  

 

Meat-lovers pizza

Pizza is a food that often contains too much sodium (salt) according to the American Heart Association. The more meat and cheese you add, the worse it gets. When eating pizza, limit yourself to one or two slices and opt for veggie-filled varieties. 

 

Margarine

Trans fats are common in sticks of margarine which are often marketed as a healthier alternative to butter. To be on the safe side, select a soft, spreadable margarine that contains no partially hydrogenated oils. Olive oil is also a better alternative. 

Our CCMH providers commit to helping you live a healthier lifestyle! Find a list of them by visiting CCMHHealth.com/Providers

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Healthy heart luncheon information

2nd February Heart Healthy Luncheon and Risk Assessments

Heart Healthy Luncheon

Featuring Dr. Eugen Ivan, Cardiologist

Monday, February 24th, 2020 • 11:30am – 1:00pm
CCMH Oakwood Conference Center
$10 per meal

The Lunch & Learn will feature information on the Healthy Heart Center and how cardiac rehab can help you recover from a heart attack. Comanche County Memorial Hospital is the only comprehensive heart program in southwest Oklahoma and Oklahoma’s First Primary Heart Attack Center!

 

Risk Assessments

Monday, February 24th, 2020 7:00am – 11:00am
CCMH Healthy Heart Center in the Outpatient Center
$20 per person

LIPID PANEL PROFILE
Includes: Total Cholesterol, LDL/HDL, Triglycerides and Hemoglobin A1C.
For best results, no eating or drinking 8 to 10 hours before blood draw. Morning medications may be taken with a small sip of water.

FREE Risk Assessment
Includes: Height & Weight, BMI and Blood Pressure.
Appointments required.

 

RSVP by Friday, February 21, by calling 580.585.5406 for Luncheon and Risk Assessments.

Healthy heart luncheon information

February Heart Healthy Luncheon and Risk Assessments

Heart Healthy Luncheon

Featuring Dr. Timothy Trotter, Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgeon

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020 • 11:30am – 1:00pm
CCMH Oakwood Conference Center
$10 per meal

The Lunch & Learn will feature information on bypass surgery & heart valve replacement, when surgery is needed and what to expect. Comanche County Memorial Hospital is the only comprehensive heart program in southwest Oklahoma and Oklahoma’s First Primary Heart Attack Center!

 

Risk Assessments

Wednesday, February 19, 2020 7:00am – 11:00am
CCMH Healthy Heart Center in the Outpatient Center
$20 per person

LIPID PANEL PROFILE
Includes: Total Cholesterol, LDL/HDL, Triglycerides and Hemoglobin A1C.
For best results, no eating or drinking 8 to 10 hours before blood draw. Morning medications may be taken with a small sip of water.

FREE Risk Assessment
Includes: Height & Weight, BMI and Blood Pressure.
Appointments required. RSVP by Friday, February 14, by calling 580.585.5406 for Luncheon and Risk Assessments.