Mom and child in red jackets playing in fall gold and orange leaves

Stay Healthy This Fall Season

Fall is upon us and that means changing temperatures, autumn colors, and the inevitable cold and flu season. With less time spent outdoors in the open air, it is typical for most people to find themselves in their homes surrounded by loved ones more often. While this fall will look a little different due to limits and restrictions for outings due to COVID-19, people are still susceptible to the common fall illnesses that float around during this time of year.

Want to stay healthy and strong this fall? Here are seven ways to boost your health, and mood, this Autumn.

  1. Stay Moving

    With colder temperatures arriving, it may seem easier to find an excuse to skip your morning walk or run due to colder temperatures. The truth is, even if it is colder out, moving your body and keeping your exercise routine up and “running” will help ward off certain illnesses. Add an extra layer and don’t forget your hat and gloves when the temperatures really drop. Hop on your bike or lace up your shoes and go.

  2. Brush your teeth and wash your hands

    Your mouth is one of the most bacteria-holding locations on your body. Be sure to clean those pearly whites and around your gums to protect your oral health. While at the sink, be sure to wash your hands as often as possible. Count to 20 while scrubbing, or sing your favorite song. This is one of the most effective ways to prevent contracting illnesses.

  3. Get plenty of sleep

    A no brainer. The Mayo Clinic recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for active adults. With adequate amounts of sleep, your body is able to successfully conquer tasks like muscle repair, memory consolidation and release of hormones regulating growth and appetite.

  4. Eat healthy, fresh in-season Fall fruits and vegetables

    Fall means some of our favorite foods are now more available in larger quantities due to a better growing environment and temperatures. Some of these vegetables include Apples, Bell Peppers, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Parsnips, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, and Winter Squash.

  5. Drink plenty of water and non-caffeinated fluid

    Caffeine is a diuretic, depleting your body of water. We need at LEAST 1/2 of our body weight in ounces of water a day for our body to focus on its primary functions. This will help flush toxins out of your body and provide your muscles and organs (especially your brain) with more energy to take on the everyday.

  6. Refrain from using Tobacco

    Tobacco products introduce a great number of harmful chemicals to your body. As a result, your body uses energy and toxin-eliminating functions to concentrate on removing these chemicals. This leads to less energy for functions dedicated fighting off sickness and germs that simultaneously enter your body.

  7. Get your Flu shot

    With the dangers of contracting COVID, it’s especially important to get your seasonal flu shot. This prepares your body to ward off the flu. If you receive your flu shot and begin contracting flu-like symptoms, this may indicate another health issue. Your doctor may wish to test for other viruses to help narrow down the problem, which could in turn help with recovery time.

 

Fall means change and a lot of it. Be sure to practice good self-health in order to avoid illness and have a safe, enjoyable autumn. If you have any questions about seasonal wellness or flu-like symptoms, contact your CCMH provider to set up an appointment today.

 

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Sources:

The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/how-many-hours-of-sleep-are-enough/faq-20057898

The Sleep Foundation: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-happens-when-you-sleep

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/healthy-fall.htm

 

young women ovarian cancer risk

This Common Symptom of Ovarian Cancer is Often Overlooked

A lack of awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms may have serious consequences for some women.

 

What is ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a type of female reproductive cancer that begins in the ovaries. Women typically have two ovaries, one on each side of the uterus. The ovaries are about the size of an almond. They produce eggs and important hormones- estrogen and progesterone.

 

Statistics about ovarian cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, each year in the U.S., over 21,000 women receive their diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Nearly 14,000 also die from the disease annually. The risk of developing the disease increases with age and is about 1 in 78. Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women, accounting for the most deaths over any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

 

Why is ovarian cancer often overlooked?

According to the Mayo Clinic, one of the major concerns regarding ovarian cancer is that it often goes undetected until it reaches the belly and pelvis. At later stages, ovarian cancer is more difficult to treat and more likely fatal.

Ovarian cancer is also often asymptomatic in the early stages. Later stages have noticeable symptoms, but they can be non-specific, such as loss of appetite and weight loss.

 

Which symptom of ovarian cancer do women overlook?

A study led by researchers in the U.K. of a non-profit organization, Target Research, discovered that many women are likely to miss a common ovarian cancer symptom and change their diet other than visit their doctor. Common symptoms of ovarian cancer include always feeling full, persistent bloating, stomach pain, and needing to urinate more.

The organization surveyed more than 1,100 women. How did women respond to hypothetically experiencing bloating?

  • 34% said they would visit their doctor if regularly experiencing bloating.
  • 50% said they would consider dietary changes. These changes include removing dairy or gluten or adding probiotic yogurt.
  • 43% said they would Google their symptoms.
  • 23%  said they would purchase over-the-counter medications.
  • 22% said they would exercise more.

A previous survey by Target Research found that only 20% of women identified bloating as a symptom of ovarian cancer.

 

Other common symptoms of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer was once thought of as a “silent killer.” That changed in the 1990s however when research revealed catching early symptoms and beginning treatment can greatly improve a patient’s outcome. Besides the mentioned symptoms, other potential symptoms include nausea, fatigue,  menstrual changes, pain during sex, back pain, and constipation.

 

If you experience any of the symptoms above, do not delay in reaching out to your CCMH Provider.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While we frequently update content, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

psoriasis

Do You Have Psoriasis?

Red, itchy scaly patches- anyone with psoriasis knows how uncomfortable the condition can make you feel. This non-contagious skin disease occurs mostly on the scalp, trunk, elbows, and knees.

Psoriasis is a chronic condition with no cure. It may subside for periods of time or even go into remission. However, cycles of the disease may occur for a few weeks or months. Your doctor may recommend certain medications or lifestyle changes to manage the disease.

 

Risk factors

Anyone may develop psoriasis. According to the Mayo Clinic, around 1/3 of cases  begin in the pediatric years. The following factors can increase your risk:

Smoking

Tobacco increases not only the risk and plays a role in disease development, but it increases the severity of psoriasis. Smoking may also play a role in the initial development of the disease.

Family history

Having a parent with psoriasis increases your risk of getting psoriasis yourself. Having two parents with psoriasis increases your risk even more.

Stress

Stress impacts your immune system. High levels of stress may increase your risk of psoriasis.

 

What causes psoriasis? 

Research demonstrates that psoriasis may cause the skin to regenerate at faster than normal rates. The rapid growth of cells causes the red patches of skin. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis.

We do not know what causes this abnormality in the immune system.

 

What are the symptoms of psoriasis?

All psoriasis patients are affected differently by the disease. The following are common symptoms:

Stiff and swollen joints

Small scaling spots (more common in children)

Cracked, dry skin that may bleed or itch

Soreness, burning, and itching

Nails that are pitted, thickened, or ridged

If you suspect you have psoriasis or your condition worsens, reach out to a CCMH Provider today!

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

breastfeeding mom

Help the Environment by Breastfeeding Your Baby

August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week!  Over 120 countries recognize this impactful week for moms and babies.

It is widely recommended by physicians and health care authorities that mothers exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first six months of life and continue to breastfeed while introducing solids during the second half of the first year of life.

Breastfeeding has incredible health benefits for both moms and babies. However, an often-overlooked benefit is breastfeeding’s positive impact on the environment. There’s no better time than now to discuss it though. The theme of World Breastfeeding Week for 2020 is “Support breastfeeding for a healthier planet!”

 

How does breastfeeding impact the environment? 

Breastmilk is the most nutritionally balanced food for your baby. Breastmilk contains no preservatives, processing, or risk of contaminants.

In a way, breast milk is a renewable resource and saves energy! When feeding directly from the breast, there is no need to warm milk. You supply the perfect ingredients for your baby at just the right temperature!

Breastfeeding also reduces waste. It only requires the mom and baby’s body to make it happen! Bottles and formulas require a lot of packaging to produce, promote, and recycle. Therefore, breastfeeding is most efficient to reduce waste and save energy.

 

How does pumping breast milk affect the environment? 

Some moms prefer to pump instead of feed directly on the breast. This may be so others can feed baby while mom is away or due to issues with baby’s latch on the breast. A breast pump requires additional gear and storage products. However, it’s still more friendly to mother earth than formula feeding. Many products needed to pump are also reusable.

Upon the completion of a breastfeeding journey, some manufacturers also have a recycling program for their breast pumps.

 

If you are a mom who was able to breastfeed and did, we thank you! You have played a part to positively impact our planet and create a healthier society.

 

Learn about CCMH’s breastfeeding support provided to moms and babies through our “baby-friendly” designation.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

woman in mask

Why the Bubonic Plague Is Not a Great Concern

China reported a case of the bubonic plague in a herdsman living in the northern city of Bayannur earlier this month. This morning, ABC News reported a squirrel testing positive for the disease in Colorado.

Hearing of recent cases of the bubonic plague naturally might make you feel uneasy as we continue to fight the COVID-19 Pandemic. After all, the disease did trigger the “Black Death” Pandemic in the mid-1300s. Black Death killed around 50 million in Europe alone. The pandemic continued for centuries, making it one of the deadliest diseases in history.

 

What is plague?

Plague is an infectious disease.  In 1894, Alexandre Yersin discovered Yersinia pestis, the bacterium responsible for plague, under a microscope. The most common carriers of Yersinia pestis are small mammals and their fleas. Fleas transmit the disease to mammals including humans. Therefore, transmission can take place from direct contact with a flea, or from an animal infected by the flea. There are three forms of plague: bubonic, pneumonic, and septicemic.

 

How does plague spread?

Many mammals are hosts of Yersinia pestis. These mammals include mice, rats, prairie dogs, rabbits, chipmunks, and squirrels. Rats are often associated with the plague. They were once a common catalyst for plague spread due to their close proximity to humans in crowded, unsanitary urban areas.

Recently, scientists discovered that Xenopsylla cheopis, a flea that lives on rats, is in fact the main cause of human cases of plague. After a rodent dies from plague, fleas jump to a new host, infecting the new host. Transmission also occurs through handling tissue or blood from a plague-infected animal, or inhalation of infected droplets.

 

What are the symptoms of plague?

Initial symptoms of the early stages of bubonic plague include vomiting, nausea, and fever. Bubonic plague’s name derives from buboes—swollen, painful lymph nodes which are also a symptom of plague. They occur around the armpit, neck, or groin.  These skin sores turn black, giving it its nickname “Black Death.”

Pneumonic plague is the most infectious type. This advanced stage of plague moves into the lungs. Pneumonic plague passes directly from person to person via airborne particles coughed from an infected person’s lungs.

Untreated, bubonic and pneumonic plague may progress to septicemic plague. Septicemic plague infects the bloodstream. Nearly all humans infected with pneumonic and septicemic plague die.

 

The beginning of plague in the United States

The first known cases of plague in the  United States occurred in 1900. Cases arrived in the U.S.  by rat-infested steamships, mainly those arriving from Asia. Epidemics in port cities were not uncommon.  In 1924-1925, the last U.S. urban plague epidemic occurred in Los Angeles. Plague then spread from urban rats to rural rodents, causing the disease to occur in more rural areas of the Western U.S.

 

Is plague common today?

Plague spread today is mostly sporadic. It pops up in countries all around the world each year including the United States. The World Health Organization reports 1,000 to 3,000 new cases of the disease every year. Plague is present on all continents with the exception of Oceania. Most human cases, however, have occurred in Africa since the 1990s. The top three countries that experience plague are Peru, Madagascar, and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) with DRC having the highest number of cases.

Scientists link the prevalence of plague in DRC to the mountainous terrain and tropical climate.  The most recent outbreak of plague happened in Madagascar in 2017 with more than 2,300 cases.

The United States, China, India, Vietnam, and Mongolia are common countries that report human plague cases. In the U.S., seven human cases of plague appear each year on average, emerging primarily in California and the southwestern states.

 

Is plague still deadly?

It is virtually impossible that the plague could become a pandemic due to modern medicine. Untreated, the plague still progresses to a deadly stage, but today, most people survive with rapid diagnosis and antibiotic treatment.  Antibiotics work best if given within 24 hours of symptoms. In severe cases, patients can receive oxygen, intravenous fluids, and breathing support. Those who have come into contact with an animal or person who has the plague may also take preventative antibiotics.

 

How do we prevent the spread of plague?

To prevent plague outbreaks, practice good sanitation, hygiene and pest control, and; minimize contact with wild animals that may carry infected fleas.

 

Sources 

1 Yes the Bubonic Plague Is Still Around, Why You Don’t Need to Worry. Healthline. Ries, Julia. 7 July 2020.

2 Plague was one of history’s deadliest diseases—then we found a cure. National Geographic. Howard, Jenny.

3 PlagueWorld Health Organization.

4 Maps and Statistics, Plagues in the United States. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 

5 Squirrel tests positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. ABC News. Haworth, Jon. 14 July 2020.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

girl with asthma allergies

New Study Shows Link Between Sleep and Asthma, Allergies in Teens

According to a study published in ERJ Open Research, teens that are prone to staying up and waking later are more likely to suffer from allergies and asthma compared to those who go to sleep and wake earlier.

Researchers have seen a strong link in the past between asthma symptoms and the body’s internal clock. However, this is the first study that considers how sleep preferences influence asthma risk in teens.

Researchers consider this study to be another piece of research that demonstrates the importance of sleep timing. They hope the study encourages new research into the effects of sleep on respiratory health.

The team chose to study the relationship between sleep and respiratory health because of the increasing worldwide prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in children and adolescents. Tobacco smoke and pollution definitely account for this increase, but the team still feels there is more to learn.

 

Details of the study

The study took place in India among  1,684 adolescents, ages 13-14. Each participant reported symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, wheezing, or an asthma diagnosis. The teens answered questions about day/nighttime preferences and when they are typically sleepy. They also noted how tired they feel first thing in the morning and when they prefer to get up.

Researchers considered not only the symptoms and sleep preferences but other factors that affect allergies and asthma. These factors included whether their family members smoke and where the participants live.

 

Results of the study

The team discovered allergic rhinitis to be twice as high in late-sleepers and asthma was around three times higher.

The researchers noted that staying up late may not necessarily cause asthma, but we do know that the sleep hormone melatonin is many times out of sync for late-sleepers. This could influence the allergic response for teens.

The team hopes other researchers will be encouraged to join them in their efforts, and wonders if encouraging teens to unplug from screens which often keep them up later could help decrease asthma and allergy risk.

 

Plans for future research into the link between allergies, asthma and sleep

In 2028-29, the research team plans to begin a second phase of the study. The study will repeat with a new group of teenagers to see if there has been any changes in teen sleeping habits and respiratory health.

 

We know sleep is vitally important for many of the body’s functions and organs including the heart. To learn healthy sleep tips, visit ccmhhealth.com/center-for-sleep-medicine/sleep-tips.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

smiling girl outside

The Difference Between Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke: When to Sweat It and Seek Care

Overheating is common for those who seek more time in the sun. However, heat exhaustion is a serious concern. If left untreated, it could result in a life-threatening situation known as a Heat Stroke. Heat Strokes occur when your body temperature rises to 103 degrees F or higher. The condition is most commonly experienced during the summer months. This is due to humidity and the sun being high when we spend more time outdoors.

 

Unsure of how to differentiate between heat exhaustion and a heat stroke? Read more to learn about the signs and symptoms of each and how to treat them fast! This action could help save your life or the life of someone you love.

 

 

What is the difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke?

 

Both heat exhaustion and heat stroke are serious conditions. Heat exhaustion begins with general muscle weakness, sudden excessive sweating, nausea and vomiting, and possible fainting. A heat stroke is when your body’s internal temperature reaches over 103 degrees. You begin experiencing a loss or change of consciousness, agitated, unexplained behavior changes, hot, red, and dry skin.  All of these symptoms should be taken seriously. Call your medical professionals immediately upon onset. According to Healthline, If you experience heat exhaustion for an extended period of time, heatstroke may occur. While many experience heat exhaustion symptoms before heat stroke, it’s not always the case.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Heatstroke:

 

There are many symptoms of a heat stroke. Be mindful if you or someone you know experiences the following while spending large amounts of time outdoors in the summer:

  • Sudden Severe Headache: It may be a migraine or just “any other headache.”  Be aware of any sudden headache onset, however. If you are spending time in the heat and high humidity, this could be a signal that our body is overheating fast.
  • Unexplained confusion or odd behavior. If someone suddenly shows signs of dizziness, confusion or agitation, loss of consciousness or disorientation, call 911. These are all beginning signs of a heat stroke.
  • Sudden rush of feeling cold and chills while sweating: When your body can’t regulate your temperature, it may send chills down your spine, literally. If you’re hot and sweating yet experiencing chills and a feeling of being cold, seek emergency care and take steps to cool down your body temperature fast.
  • Alteration in sweating. The Mayo Clinic states, “In heatstroke brought on by hot weather, your skin will feel hot and dry to the touch. However, in a heatstroke brought on by strenuous exercise, your skin may feel dry or slightly moist.” Pay attention to your skin and how you feel during strenuous activities while in a warm climate.
  • Racing Heart Rate, Rapid Breathing, Nausea, and vomiting. You could feel your heart rate increase rapidly without doing any strenuous activity and the culprit is a heat stroke. You may begin to feel sick to your stomach or physically vomit. If you experience any of these signs, it’s your body telling you to cool down, stat.

 

How to Treat Heat Stroke:

 

If you experience any of the symptoms above and suspect a heat stroke, call 911 and seek help from your local emergency care facility immediately. If you know someone who is experiencing heat exhaustion or who is beginning to show signs of a heat stroke, be sure to take them to a shaded area and apply cool compresses to their head, chest, neck, and/or back. You may also spray them with cool water from a nearby hose or use a sponge to apply cool water directly over their skin. Remove excess clothing.

 

Be careful not to cool off yourself or others too quickly by offering them ice water to drink.  Santosh Sinha, MD at Dignity Health Medical Group – Bakersfield warns that by digesting ice cold water during a heat stroke will actually “constrict the capillaries, cause stomach cramps, and decrease the absorption rate”. The sudden rush of coldness in your body could cause more damage than good with a state similar to “shock”.

 

Who is Most At Risk of Heat Stroke?

 

According to the CDC, the following individuals are most at-risk for a heat stroke:

 

  • Infants and young children
  • People 65 years of age or older
  • People who are overweight
  • Individuals who overexert during work or exercise
  • People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation
  • People traveling from cooler climates to drastically warmer climates

 

How to Prevent Heat Stroke:

 

If you know you will be spending more time outside, be sure to dress in loose clothing made of lighter fabric. Avoid darker colors to prevent heat absorption. Avoid dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids. If you feel as though heat exhaustion is coming on fast, grab a sports drink with electrolytes to replenish what has been lost through sweat. Drink plenty of water every day and avoid excessive amounts of alcohol especially when you know you will be spending most of your day out in the heat.

 

If you or someone you know shows signs of extreme heat exhaustion or heat stroke, be sure to call 911 immediately. The Drewry Family Emergency Center at Comanche County Memorial Hospital is ready to help you through any emergency you or a loved one are experiencing.

 

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

PTSD patients

Do You Think You Have PTSD?

When thinking of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), many think of soldiers. As a proud military community, we cannot deny the fact that PTSD is a troubling problem for those in the military, especially those who have faced the difficulties of combat. In fact, depending on where they served, 11-20% of all veterans experience PTSD. However, statistics also clearly show that PTSD is not just a problem that affects our military.

 

What is PTSD?

After a traumatic experience, sometimes the feeling of sadness, anxiety, and fear do not improve over time. If this is the case, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD may develop following any traumatic event.

PTSD affects people who personally experience the traumatic event, witnesses to the event, and those who assist afterward such as emergency workers and law enforcement officers. No matter the cause, with treatment and support, it is possible to manage your symptoms, reduce the pain of memories, and move beyond the trauma.

 

Statistics about PTSD 

Of the 70% of adults in the United States who have experienced a traumatic event, 20% develop PTSD.

5% of Americans have PTSD at any given time.

1 of 13 people in the U.S. develop PTSD during their lifetime.

1 out of 9 get PTSD at some time in their lives and women are about twice as likely as men to experience PTSD. *

*Statistics gathered from Sidran Institute 

 

How PTSD Occurs 

PTSD is different from person to person because everyone’s nervous system and tolerance for stress is different. While PTSD is likely during the hours or days following a traumatic event, it can sometimes take years before symptoms appear. Sometimes symptoms even appear out of the blue. Other times, they are triggered by a painful reminder of the traumatic event. Examples include an image, certain words, noise, or smell.

 

Symptoms of PTSD

There are four main symptoms of PTSD:

  1. Re-experiencing the traumatic event through flashbacks, nightmares, or memories. This includes intense mental or physical reactions when remembering the trauma.
  2. Avoiding reminders of the trauma. This includes losing interest in activities one was taking part in when the incident occurred and feeling emotionally detached from others.
  3. Hyperarousal is also a common symptom. This includes sleep problems, irritability, hypervigilance, feeling jumpy, and having angry outbursts.
  4. Negative thoughts and difficulty concentrating or remembering. This includes hopelessness, feeling distrust, betrayal, guilt, shame, self-blame.

 

PTSD symptoms in children

For children, especially younger children, the symptoms may include:

  • Fear of separation from their parent
  • Lose of previously-acquired skills such as toilet training
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping
  • Play in which aspects of the trauma are repeated
  • New anxieties and phobias such as fear of monsters
  • Re-creating the trauma through stories, drawings or play
  • Aches and pains without an apparent cause
  • Aggression and irritability

PTSD may also result from surgery when children are too young to fully understand what’s happening to them.

 

If you are struggling to recover from trauma, please reach out to one of our providers today. You can find a list of them at cmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

man with sunglasses

June is Cataract Awareness Month

A cataract occurs when the normally clear lens of your eye becomes clouded. Vision for those with cataracts is similar to looking through a foggy window. This vision change can be difficult. It decreases one’s ability to drive, read, and see the expressions on someone’s face. Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.

When symptoms first occur, glasses and good lighting may help. Overtime, cataract surgery may become necessary. This surgery is generally safe and effective.

 

How does a cataract form?

The lens, where cataracts form, is behind the iris (colored part of the eye). The lens helps to focus light and produces clear images. Over time, or due to medical conditions, the lens breaks down and becomes clouded, thicker, less transparent, and flexible as you age. As the cataract grows, the cloud thickens and covers more of the eye. As light passes through the lens, the cataract blocks light and causes it to scatter, thus, blurring the image.

Cataracts do not develop evenly although they are usually in both eyes causing different vision abilities in each eye.

 

What are the causes of cataracts?

Causes of cataracts include injury, aging, or inherited genetic disorders. Other causes include past eye surgery, diabetes, other eye conditions, or long-term usage of steroid medications.

 

What are the symptoms of cataracts?

Cataracts are a common although unfortunate part of aging. Over time, you may notice the following symptoms:

Cloudy, foggy, filmy, or blurry vision.
Sensitivity to lamps, headlights, or bright sunlight.
Glare (a halo around lights), especially when driving at night.
Prescription changes in glasses which include sudden nearsightedness.
Double vision.
Difficulty reading in lighting that used to be fine.
Poor night vision.
Seeing colors differently than before.

 

When should I see a doctor? 

Changes in visions indicate that you may need to schedule an eye exam. See your doctor immediately if you experience sudden headaches, double vision or flashes of light, or sudden eye pain.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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