smiling girl outside

The Difference Between Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke: When to Sweat It and Seek Care

Overheating is common for those who seek more time in the sun. However, heat exhaustion is a serious concern. If left untreated, it could result in a life-threatening situation known as a Heat Stroke. Heat Strokes occur when your body temperature rises to 103 degrees F or higher. The condition is most commonly experienced during the summer months. This is due to humidity and the sun being high when we spend more time outdoors.

 

Unsure of how to differentiate between heat exhaustion and a heat stroke? Read more to learn about the signs and symptoms of each and how to treat them fast! This action could help save your life or the life of someone you love.

 

 

What is the difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke?

 

Both heat exhaustion and heat stroke are serious conditions. Heat exhaustion begins with general muscle weakness, sudden excessive sweating, nausea and vomiting, and possible fainting. A heat stroke is when your body’s internal temperature reaches over 103 degrees. You begin experiencing a loss or change of consciousness, agitated, unexplained behavior changes, hot, red, and dry skin.  All of these symptoms should be taken seriously. Call your medical professionals immediately upon onset. According to Healthline, If you experience heat exhaustion for an extended period of time, heatstroke may occur. While many experience heat exhaustion symptoms before heat stroke, it’s not always the case.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Heatstroke:

 

There are many symptoms of a heat stroke. Be mindful if you or someone you know experiences the following while spending large amounts of time outdoors in the summer:

  • Sudden Severe Headache: It may be a migraine or just “any other headache.”  Be aware of any sudden headache onset, however. If you are spending time in the heat and high humidity, this could be a signal that our body is overheating fast.
  • Unexplained confusion or odd behavior. If someone suddenly shows signs of dizziness, confusion or agitation, loss of consciousness or disorientation, call 911. These are all beginning signs of a heat stroke.
  • Sudden rush of feeling cold and chills while sweating: When your body can’t regulate your temperature, it may send chills down your spine, literally. If you’re hot and sweating yet experiencing chills and a feeling of being cold, seek emergency care and take steps to cool down your body temperature fast.
  • Alteration in sweating. The Mayo Clinic states, “In heatstroke brought on by hot weather, your skin will feel hot and dry to the touch. However, in a heatstroke brought on by strenuous exercise, your skin may feel dry or slightly moist.” Pay attention to your skin and how you feel during strenuous activities while in a warm climate.
  • Racing Heart Rate, Rapid Breathing, Nausea, and vomiting. You could feel your heart rate increase rapidly without doing any strenuous activity and the culprit is a heat stroke. You may begin to feel sick to your stomach or physically vomit. If you experience any of these signs, it’s your body telling you to cool down, stat.

 

How to Treat Heat Stroke:

 

If you experience any of the symptoms above and suspect a heat stroke, call 911 and seek help from your local emergency care facility immediately. If you know someone who is experiencing heat exhaustion or who is beginning to show signs of a heat stroke, be sure to take them to a shaded area and apply cool compresses to their head, chest, neck, and/or back. You may also spray them with cool water from a nearby hose or use a sponge to apply cool water directly over their skin. Remove excess clothing.

 

Be careful not to cool off yourself or others too quickly by offering them ice water to drink.  Santosh Sinha, MD at Dignity Health Medical Group – Bakersfield warns that by digesting ice cold water during a heat stroke will actually “constrict the capillaries, cause stomach cramps, and decrease the absorption rate”. The sudden rush of coldness in your body could cause more damage than good with a state similar to “shock”.

 

Who is Most At Risk of Heat Stroke?

 

According to the CDC, the following individuals are most at-risk for a heat stroke:

 

  • Infants and young children
  • People 65 years of age or older
  • People who are overweight
  • Individuals who overexert during work or exercise
  • People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation
  • People traveling from cooler climates to drastically warmer climates

 

How to Prevent Heat Stroke:

 

If you know you will be spending more time outside, be sure to dress in loose clothing made of lighter fabric. Avoid darker colors to prevent heat absorption. Avoid dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids. If you feel as though heat exhaustion is coming on fast, grab a sports drink with electrolytes to replenish what has been lost through sweat. Drink plenty of water every day and avoid excessive amounts of alcohol especially when you know you will be spending most of your day out in the heat.

 

If you or someone you know shows signs of extreme heat exhaustion or heat stroke, be sure to call 911 immediately. The Drewry Family Emergency Center at Comanche County Memorial Hospital is ready to help you through any emergency you or a loved one are experiencing.

 

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

PTSD patients

Do You Think You Have PTSD?

When thinking of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), many think of soldiers. As a proud military community, we cannot deny the fact that PTSD is a troubling problem for those in the military, especially those who have faced the difficulties of combat. In fact, depending on where they served, 11-20% of all veterans experience PTSD. However, statistics also clearly show that PTSD is not just a problem that affects our military.

 

What is PTSD?

After a traumatic experience, sometimes the feeling of sadness, anxiety, and fear do not improve over time. If this is the case, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD may develop following any traumatic event.

PTSD affects people who personally experience the traumatic event, witnesses to the event, and those who assist afterward such as emergency workers and law enforcement officers. No matter the cause, with treatment and support, it is possible to manage your symptoms, reduce the pain of memories, and move beyond the trauma.

 

Statistics about PTSD 

Of the 70% of adults in the United States who have experienced a traumatic event, 20% develop PTSD.

5% of Americans have PTSD at any given time.

1 of 13 people in the U.S. develop PTSD during their lifetime.

1 out of 9 get PTSD at some time in their lives and women are about twice as likely as men to experience PTSD. *

*Statistics gathered from Sidran Institute 

 

How PTSD Occurs 

PTSD is different from person to person because everyone’s nervous system and tolerance for stress is different. While PTSD is likely during the hours or days following a traumatic event, it can sometimes take years before symptoms appear. Sometimes symptoms even appear out of the blue. Other times, they are triggered by a painful reminder of the traumatic event. Examples include an image, certain words, noise, or smell.

 

Symptoms of PTSD

There are four main symptoms of PTSD:

  1. Re-experiencing the traumatic event through flashbacks, nightmares, or memories. This includes intense mental or physical reactions when remembering the trauma.
  2. Avoiding reminders of the trauma. This includes losing interest in activities one was taking part in when the incident occurred and feeling emotionally detached from others.
  3. Hyperarousal is also a common symptom. This includes sleep problems, irritability, hypervigilance, feeling jumpy, and having angry outbursts.
  4. Negative thoughts and difficulty concentrating or remembering. This includes hopelessness, feeling distrust, betrayal, guilt, shame, self-blame.

 

PTSD symptoms in children

For children, especially younger children, the symptoms may include:

  • Fear of separation from their parent
  • Lose of previously-acquired skills such as toilet training
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping
  • Play in which aspects of the trauma are repeated
  • New anxieties and phobias such as fear of monsters
  • Re-creating the trauma through stories, drawings or play
  • Aches and pains without an apparent cause
  • Aggression and irritability

PTSD may also result from surgery when children are too young to fully understand what’s happening to them.

 

If you are struggling to recover from trauma, please reach out to one of our providers today. You can find a list of them at cmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

man with sunglasses

June is Cataract Awareness Month

A cataract occurs when the normally clear lens of your eye becomes clouded. Vision for those with cataracts is similar to looking through a foggy window. This vision change can be difficult. It decreases one’s ability to drive, read, and see the expressions on someone’s face. Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.

When symptoms first occur, glasses and good lighting may help. Overtime, cataract surgery may become necessary. This surgery is generally safe and effective.

 

How does a cataract form?

The lens, where cataracts form, is behind the iris (colored part of the eye). The lens helps to focus light and produces clear images. Over time, or due to medical conditions, the lens breaks down and becomes clouded, thicker, less transparent, and flexible as you age. As the cataract grows, the cloud thickens and covers more of the eye. As light passes through the lens, the cataract blocks light and causes it to scatter, thus, blurring the image.

Cataracts do not develop evenly although they are usually in both eyes causing different vision abilities in each eye.

 

What are the causes of cataracts?

Causes of cataracts include injury, aging, or inherited genetic disorders. Other causes include past eye surgery, diabetes, other eye conditions, or long-term usage of steroid medications.

 

What are the symptoms of cataracts?

Cataracts are a common although unfortunate part of aging. Over time, you may notice the following symptoms:

Cloudy, foggy, filmy, or blurry vision.
Sensitivity to lamps, headlights, or bright sunlight.
Glare (a halo around lights), especially when driving at night.
Prescription changes in glasses which include sudden nearsightedness.
Double vision.
Difficulty reading in lighting that used to be fine.
Poor night vision.
Seeing colors differently than before.

 

When should I see a doctor? 

Changes in visions indicate that you may need to schedule an eye exam. See your doctor immediately if you experience sudden headaches, double vision or flashes of light, or sudden eye pain.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

women with covid-19

Do I Need to be Tested for COVID-19?

As new information emerges during the evolving COVID-19 Pandemic, it seems you can find an article with just about any possible symptom pointing to COVID-19. You may begin to wonder, “Do I have COVID-19?” Information you gather from reliable, medically-based sources may be useful. However, research should never replace the assessment of a physician. These are unusual circumstances though. During the time of social distancing when seeking medical treatment may put you more at risk for coming in contact with this novel coronavirus, there are a few questions you can use to self-assess.

 

 

Here are the questions to consider:

 

Do you have any of the following emergency symptoms?

If you have emergency COVID-19 signs and symptoms, such as chest pain or pressure, confusion, trouble breathing, or blue lips or face, seek medical care immediately! A trip to the ER or call to 911 sounds necessary. Let the emergency operator know your symptoms and wear a face covering over your mouth and nose if being transported by ambulance. The phone number for our emergency department is (580) 355-8620.

 

Do you have any of the following symptoms?

New trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or wheezing may all be symptoms that point to COVID-19. Other symptoms include muscle aches, sore throat, diarrhea, loss of smell, change in taste, a cough, and a fever. Generally, patients suffering from COVID-19 have a fever of 100.5 or greater.

 

Consider your contact with others

Have you been within 6 feet of someone with a confirmed case of COVID-19? Did you see him or her for at least 5 minutes, or have direct contact with their saliva or mucus at any point in the past 14 days? Does the person with COVID-19 live with you?

According to the CDC, although we are still learning about how the virus transmits, it is thought to spread mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets. These droplets reach others when the infected person coughs or sneezes. When these droplets land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or the person inhales them into their lungs, they may also become infected.

The incubation period is the time someone comes in contact with the virus until symptoms are present. For COVID-19, the incubation period is typically 2-11 days. To be safe, health professionals are asking patients to consider who he or she has come in contact with within a two week period.

 

If you feel it is possible you may have COVID-19, self isolate if you are not in need of immediate care, and reach out to your medical provider by phone. He or she will advise you how it is best to act.

 

 

Do you have other questions about COVID-19? Check out or resources at ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

kid with covid 19

FAQS: Covid-19 and Children

You have probably heard that children are less susceptible to COVID-19. However, it is understandable that parents are concerned for their children in regard to a novel virus that we are still learning about. Here is a summary of frequently asked questions parents have asked about the virus based on research provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

 

Should my child wear a mask?

Children 2 years or older should wear a mask or cloth covering over their nose and mouth when in public. Of course, getting a toddler to wear a mask may present a challenge. Having a fabric they choose, letting them “help” make their mask if you make a homemade mask, and explaining that you will wear one too may help.

The CDC recommends wearing a mask in addition to social distancing, NOT in place of social distancing. Remember that the incubation period for the virus is around two weeks in some cases. So even if your child has no symptoms, wearing a covering could protect them from spreading the virus if he or she is asymptomatic.

 

Do children with COVID-19 have different symptoms than adults?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are the same for adults and children. Children, however, usually have milder symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, including cough, fever and runny nose. Some have also reported vomiting and diarrhea.

Parents of children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs should be cautious. We are still learning if certain conditions put children at higher risk.

 

How do I keep my child safe during the COVID-19 outbreak?

Practice the same advice given to adults. Limit your child’s contact with others outside of the home and practice social distancing. Limit your child’s interaction with elder adults and those at high risk as much as possible. Although COVID-19 may be milder for children, children often spread illnesses due to not having a hygiene routine.

Help children to develop a good hygiene routine by observing you. For younger children, you may which to teach them songs about handwashing or show them cartoons about developing a good hygiene routine. Slightly older children may benefit from videos

Children should not be going to playdates and other activities. If you must take your child to daycare because you are required to work outside of your home in an essential business, ensure your daycare is working to maintain your child’s safety at this time. The CDC has given special guidance for how daycare centers should operate during the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

No matter what, try to remain calm and limit your young child’s exposure to media. This is a difficult, confusing time for all of us. Maintaining a happy home and making the most of the situation by creating good memories of this time for children is so important. If you need ideas of how to thrive while isolating, check out this recent article.

 

For more resources on COVID-19, visit: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

working out during COVID-19

Staying Fit in Isolation

Much like the joke that freshman college students gain the “freshmen fifteen” a trending hashtag on social media is #quarantine15. Due to the stress, loneliness, and uncertainty of this time, you may wish to turn to food for comfort and to destress.

 

Passing the time by trying a new recipe, cooking with your significant other or children, or celebrating little blessings with a special dessert at this time, are all great ways to make the most of a stressful situation.

 

Don’t feel guilty if you take a break from the normal routine or gain a few pounds as you try to get a handle on all the difficult emotions you may be facing at this time. However, staying healthy could not be more important than at a time like now.

 

Free home workout options

The easiest way to begin an at-home workout routine is through the guidance of instructor-led videos. Many of these videos require no additional equipment and give you the benefit of being able to pause them to perfect your technique.

Many companies are offering their workouts for free or as an extended trial as COVID-19 runs its course. So there’s no better time than now to try out a new workout and establish a good routine.

Here are a variety of workouts by leading companies in fitness that you can try at this time for free.

 

Peloton

Peloton produces top of the line treadmills and exercise bikes. Their workout app is normally $13 a month. However, Peloton is currently offering a free, 90-day trial. You do not have to own their equipment to use the app. The videos include strength, yoga, meditation, boot camp, and cardio classes. If you’re still able to get outdoors, audio-only classes are available for outdoor running.

 

CorePower Yoga

CorePower shut down their studio and moved to online-only classes that you can stream from their website. New classes are added weekly, including yoga, sculpt, and meditation. The company is offering some free classes while the studio remains closed, but you can also gain access to all of their videos for $19.99 per month.

 

Nike Training Club

Nike Training Club offers an always free workout app with a wide variety of home workouts, including programs that help you set a workout schedule. The app allows you to filter your search results based on the equipment you have available also.

 

Les Mills

If you’ve ever had a membership at a gym, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of Body Pump, a popular class, managed by Les Mills. Les Mills also offers dance, yoga, and boxing, many equipment free classes. All their classes are available on-demand with a 30-day free trial.

 

Amazon Prime Video

If you have an Amazon Prime membership, you already have free access to a library of fitness videos, like Zumba and cardio programs. Just search for “fitness,” then check the “Prime” box in the left sidebar to see what’s available for free streaming.

 

YouTube 

YouTube is a great place to find all sorts of exercise videos. Try something creative like rebounding if you have a trampoline at home or learn some new dance moves. Consider using Fitness Blender, a great library of over 100 free workouts.

 

Basic workout equipment under $100

There is plenty you can do without a single piece of equipment and many of us have financial concerns to consider due to the COVID-19 outbreak. However, if you can afford to invest in some equipment, here is a list of more affordable options which can be ordered via Amazon or various websites. We’ll link to them, but,of course, we cannot guarantee their availability when you read this article:

 

Jump rope

Workout mat 

Dumbbells

Lacrosse ball

Foam roller 

Yoga block

 

Have questions about COVID-19? We’re here for you. Check out ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

COVID-19 family washing hands

Could Your Diet Help Flatten the Curve?

COVID-19 seems to be disrupting every aspect of peoples’ daily lives all over the world. Some of us have lost jobs, some are worried about family members who have to continue to work due to being in an essential business, some are worried about family members who may be high risk or separated from us. At times, it feels overwhelming and like there is nothing we can do to fight this invisible enemy. That is not true, however.

 

Hopefully, you are following the guidelines put in place in your community as well as social distancing, washing your hands well and frequently, and sheltering in place as much as possible.

 

Is there more you can do? Yes, there is. You can take the best possible care of yourself during these uncertain times. Doing your best to eat healthy foods could lessen your chances of getting ill, keep you out of the hospital and from infecting others.

 

How do you boost your immunity to help fight COVID-19?

 

Unfortunately, there is no magical food or pill that is guaranteed to boost your immune system and fight off COVID-19. However, a healthy immune system will help. Nutrients that may help the immune response include selenium, vitamins A, C, D, E, B-6, zinc, iron, and folate; with additional potentially promising effects of whole foods like broccoli, goji berry, green tea, and turmeric. Some of these nutrients may help reduce inflammation and protect from tissue damage due to the virus that can lead to lung injury and failure, and even death.

 

It is too early to know what mixture of nutrients is the best to keep Covid-19 at bay. But we do know that several of these nutrients have shown promising effects for flu, common colds, and respiratory infections.

 

Which foods might keep me from getting COVID-19?

 

We know you may not be able to find just anything in the stores right now due to overbuying, but here are some foods that may help boost your immunity: spinach, berries, bananas, citrus fruits, broccoli,  mushrooms, red bell peppers, shellfish, sweet potatoes, peanut butter, almonds, beans, hazelnuts,  turmeric, and tea. Eggs, cheese, tofu, milk, and mushrooms are also great choices.

 

These foods may be especially important for those who are at high risk for contacting COVID-19.

 

Hydration is also important

 

Even mild dehydration can put stress on the body. A good goal is half your body weight in ounces of water. For example, someone who weighs 150 pounds should drink approximately 75 ounces in water. The water from soups, vegetables, and fruits also helps to hydrate the body.

 

Can I take supplements to protect me from COVID-19?

 

There has not been enough time to conduct significant research on natural alternatives to fighting COVID-19. However, some doctors believe that supplements such as elderberry could help. Elderberry has been shown to be effective in treating upper respiratory infections in some studies. However, you should always discuss supplement usage with your doctor. Elderberry may interact with some medications.

 

 

Even if just a small percentage of the population began eating healthier to help ward off this pandemic, think how much it could help our world! Let’s all do our part. We are all in this together!

 

If you have more questions about COVID-19 in Comanche county, visit our resources page: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources/.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

covid 19- grocery store

How to Protect Yourself from COVID-19 When you Need to Go Out

Many in the community are practicing social distancing and getting out as little as possible. As the confirmed cases of COVID-19 rise in Comanche County, you may be getting nervous about having to be out for errands you cannot completely avoid such as occasional grocery shopping. Although feeling apprehensive about going out is understandable, there are several steps you can take to protect yourself while you are out. Here are a few:

 

 

Limit going inside businesses as much as possible

 

Many businesses, especially restaurants, are offering curbside delivery or drive-thru options as dining in is not an option right now. If you’re unsure if the business you need to visit is offering such services, it does not hurt to call and ask them if they would mind accommodating you.

Also, consider having essentials delivered or take turns running errands with a friend. The fewer people out on any given day, the better! If you are elderly or in the high-risk category for contracting COVID-19 due to health reasons, you may wish to reach out to a friend or neighbor. He or she would probably love to help you out. If you know of someone who is unemployed due to the outbreak, he or she could probably use some extra cash in exchange for helping you out as well. Lawton Family YMCA is also offering to pick up groceries for seniors who order groceries through the Walmart grocery app.

 

 

Make use of technology

 

You may wish to ask simple things like documents to be mailed or emailed to you instead of visiting a business. Take advantage of video chat options like FaceTime, Skype or Zoom to conduct business whenever possible.

If you have a non-urgent medical need, call your physician first to see what your options are. Many people also have access to free telemedicine services through the insurance provider. Memorial Medical Group is also providing access to telemedicine through many of our clinics.

 

 

Make a protective masks

 

When you do go out, try to wear a protective mask. Please remember our people working on the “front lines” of this epidemic. Our health professionals, restaurant workers, grocery clerks, etc., need masks and gloves more than anyone. Protecting them protects us all as they will likely be exposed to more carriers of COVID-19 than most of us.

However, you can find instructions on how to sew a homemade mask. Even if it isn’t the N-95 masks that provide the best protection, it can still keep you from touching your face which in return could possibly keep you from contracting the virus.

Think outside the box on how to protect your hands. Don’t touch items you don’t intend to buy. Use another type of plastic besides gloves. There have been people using bags used to clean up after their dogs when they take them outside to “take care of business!”

 

 

Sanitize your hands often

 

Sanitize your hands before going in and after leaving a business. If you can’t find sanitizer, you can make your own using alcohol and aloe vera gel.

 

 

Change your clothing as soon as possible

 

Before entering your home, remove your shoes and spray them with disinfectant. Remove clothes as soon as you enter and put them directly into the washing machine. You can wash them later if needed, but this keeps you from having to pick them up again before washing.

 

 

Sanitize items and let them sit

 

The COVID-19 virus can last hours to days on items depending on what material the item is made of. If possible, seal the bag grocery items are in to protect them, spray with disinfectant spray, and let it sit for a few days.

 

 

Wipe down surfaces touched by new items entering your home

 

If you can’t find disinfectant wipes in stores, you can make those too using paper towels and rubbing alcohol to wipe down surfaces.

 

 

Don’t allow anyone else to put items purchased away

To limit exposure to others living in the household, only the person who picked up items should put them away. This will help limit the exposure to any germs lingering on the items from others who have not yet touched them.

 

 

Have other questions about COVID-19? Visit ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

family in social isolation

Taking Care of Yourself and Your Family During Social Isolation

Due to the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19), many individuals and families are now finding themselves dealing with a whole new way of living in social isolation due to work being moved home and/ or schools closing. During these uncertain times, taking care of yourself mentally, emotionally, and physically is more important than ever!

 

Here are ten tips to help you navigate these challenging times.

 

Create a routine

 

Having a few “vacation days” from the norm can be enjoyable at first. Use the time to let yourself or your children enjoy sleeping in, wearing pajamas all day, watching movies or playing video or board games.

However, having a routine reduces stress on yourself and children. Lay our clothes and prepare meals for the next day. Establish hours for educational time as well as chores if your children are old enough. The more like “normal” this time feels, the easier it will be on all.

 

Be careful of what your kids overhear

 

Kids often pick up more adult conversation than you realize. You may want to save turning on the news until after they go to bed and limit the adult conversation they are exposed to regarding the coronavirus.

They may be too old for you to completely shield them from it, however. Just because they don’t ask you about it, doesn’t mean they aren’t internalizing some fear. Have conversations with your child as appropriate and let them ask questions. It may be a good time to have important science lessons with younger children about germs and how to prevent illnesses.

 

Accomplish something new

 

Now may be a great time to find some video tutorials and learn a new skill or hobby. Try a new workout, write the book you’ve always planned to but never find time for, learn a new instrument, or master a new recipe. You may even wish to include your children in learning a new skill you haven’t found the time for amidst a busy schedule.

 

Make a simple, flexible meal plan

 

To keep the spread of coronavirus to a minimum, it is best to limit your grocery trips as much as possible. Yet, many individuals are finding it difficult to find some basic necessities, finding availability for grocery pick up, and having to shop multiple stores.

To keep your shopping as simple as possible, make a list of basic but healthy meals and a list of needed ingredients. Attempt to buy the ingredients as you find them and rotate through this meal plan.

Now is also a great time to reach out to friends and neighbors that may have farm-fresh produce and meat. We are fortunate to be in an area where we have an abundance of possibilities!

 

Form a strategy for working efficiently

 

Parents that work from home regularly love the extra time with their children. However, working from home has its challenges and disadvantages. To be successful, it takes a lot of flexibility on the part of the employee and employer as well as time management strategies. Some parents get up before their children and work an hour or two. Some work an hour or two after bed.

Prepping the night before helps as well. Prep snacks, meals and sippy cups. This includes your own drinks and snacks.

Plan a fun activity for small children and rotate toys to maximize playtime.

 

Remember that the outdoors are not canceled

 

Some fresh air, sunshine, and activity does the body good! Just because you shouldn’t be in large groups of people right now, doesn’t mean you can’t be outside. Play in your yard if you have a nice area to do so, or plan an outing with your family. Now may be a great time to discover a new park or take advantage of a nice spring day and visit the wildlife refuge.

 

Give each other space when necessary

 

Constantly being together has its challenges. Create boundaries to ensure everyone gets the peace and quiet they need. You could create a fun space for children with bean bags, or other alternative seating or even make a tent with blankets. Set aside an hour a day where everyone reads or listens to music in their rooms.

Parents, find some time to unwind and enjoy the quiet alone after kids go to bed. You deserve it!

 

Clean

 

Not only is it a good idea to sanitize to ward off illness, but decluttering is a great way to improve your mood. Psychologists say it is even important for your mental health. Now may be a great time to straighten up the garage, organize your home office, or accomplish whatever other cleaning task that always gets put off. You never know what items you are ready to get rid of that someone needs during this time.

 

Find your outlet

 

There are many ways to help yourself combat all the emotions in these times of uncertainty.

Journaling is a great outlet that boosts your mood.

Exercising is another mood booster which you should be doing anyway to stay healthy!

Doing something kind for others is also an excellent way to put a positive spin on the situation.
Offer to pick up groceries and other necessities for an elderly neighbor or make cards for elderly patients quarantined in local nursing facilities. Help stock a local food pantry since many children are unable to get a needed meal at school at this time.

 

Keep in touch with friends and family

 

Although it isn’t the same as a good old fashioned gettogether, technology does help when we are in isolation away from dear friends and family members. Social media, emails, texts and FaceTime make it easier for keeping up with those we care about.

 

 

Check out how we are working to keep our community safe here: ccmhhealth.com/coronavirus-annoucement.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

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