red meat hamburger

Swapping Red Meat for Chicken May Lower Cancer Risk 

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women aside from skin cancer. It affects around 1 in 8 women in the United States during their lifetime. 1

 

However, many factors influence the chance of a woman developing breast cancer. Due to the variety of these factors, some which are environmental and lifestyle choices, causes can be difficult to pinpoint. 

 

That is to say, recent research often focuses on factors that lead to cancer which we can control such as nutrition. 

 

A recent study in The International Journal of Cancer reports that consuming poultry instead of red meat may lower breast cancer risk after gathering data from over 40,000 women. 2

 

Red meat and breast cancer?

 

The data, derived from the Sister Study, included participants from the U.S. and Puerto Rico who were 35–74 years old. Participants also provided information that included their lifestyle factors, medical history, height, weight, diet, and other demographic information.

 

The participants also reported details about their food consumption, including type of meat consumption, portion sizes and level of “doneness” of meat. 

 

Throughout the study, the research team reported 1,536 cases of breast cancer.

 

At the end of the study, the scientists concluded that women who ate more red meat had a 23% higher chance of developing breast cancer. 2

 

However, previous studies have not produced similar results. Some researchers have found no association, whereas others have shown a weak relationship between meat consumption and cancer. 

 

Poultry and breast cancer risk?

 

The scientists calculated that those who ate the most poultry had a 15% lower risk of developing breast cancer compared with those who ate little poultry. 

 

The scientists also controlled for a range of factors, including level of physical activity, household income, family history of cancer, race,  vegetable consumption, dairy consumption, body mass index (BMI), birth control usage, and also alcohol consumption. Even with these factors considered, the results were still significant.

 

The effects of cooking methods on cancer risk 

 

An earlier study discovered high consumptions of fried chicken increased breast cancer risk while intake of skinless chicken reduced risk.

 

A further study concluded that chicken cooked by any method was “significantly protective” against breast cancer. 3 The researchers in the latest study, however, found no link between the way people cooked meat and breast cancer risk.

 

However, other researchers report no links between meat consumption and breast cancer. 

 

As always, research must continue before we reach a solid conclusion about the role of meat in breast cancer.

 

 

 

Limitations of the study

 

Although the study had a large number of participants, limitations, of course, exist. For example, the study was observational. It cannot easily explain cause and effect.

 

Furthermore, dietary information was only recorded at the beginning of the study. Participants may have had dietary changes throughout the nearly seven years of the study. 

 

CCMH is proud to offer cancer care right here on our campus at the Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma. To learn more, visit their website at ccswok.com

 

Sources 

1 American Cancer Society. How Common is Breast Cancer? 18 September 2019.

2 International Journal of Cancer. Jamie J. Lo, Yong-Moon Mark Park, Rashmi Sinha and Dale P. Sandler. Association Between Meat Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer: Findings from the Sister Study. 2019.

3 Science Direct. Alacro L. Ronco, Eduardo De Stefani, Alicia Fabra.White meat intake and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Montevideo, Uruguay. 20 May 2oo2.

 

Disclaimer 

 The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

Content is frequently updated, however, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

mom and daughter on bench

Your Breast Cancer Risk as You Age

The American Cancer Society has named  breast cancer as the most common type of cancer among American women other than non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States battle breast cancer at some point during their lifetime. 

 

Typically, we think of diseases such as breast cancer a problem experienced among older women.  It is true that as you age, your chance of developing breast cancer also increases. However, women may develop breast cancer at any age. 

 

In this article, we will examine the impact age has on breast cancer. 

 

At what age do most women receive their breast cancer diagnosis? 

 

Women over the age of 50 are more likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis. In fact, the median age for this diagnosis is 62 years 1 old with most doctors giving a breast cancer diagnosis to women between the age of 55 and 64.  As we age, abnormal changes in cells are more likely to occur.

 

What is the risk for each age group? 

 

The SEER Cancer Statistics Review annually assess the risk of a woman developing breast cancer during her lifetime. According to the SEER, the risk that an American  female develops breast cancer within the next 10 years is:

 

0.44% at age 30

1.47% at age 40

2.38% at age 50

3.56% at age 60

3.82% at age 70 2

 

What age were women who received a breast cancer diagnosis in recent years? 

 

The SEER report showed 437,722 women received their breast cancer diagnosis in between 2012 and 2016. Of these women: 

 

1.9% were  20–34 years old

8.4% were 35–44 years old

20.1% were 44–55 years old

25.6% were 55–64 years old

24.8% were 65–74 years old

13.7% were 75–84 years old

5.6% were 84 years and older 

 

Certain lifestyle choices may help prevent breast cancer such as your physical activity level and alcohol consumption. However, many factors can affect a person’s risk of developing breast cancer cannot be controlled, such as family history and age. 

 

Early diagnosis is key to treating breast cancer and keeping it from spreading to surrounding tissue and other parts of the body. If you are a woman age 40 or older, it is important to undergo a mammogram annually. Learn more at ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/

 

Resources 

 

1 Susan G. Komen. Breast cancer in women. 13 May 2019. 

 

2 National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). April 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

cooking with onion and garlic

Garlic and Onion Consumption May Prevent Breast Cancer

A recent study held in Puerto Rico took a look at onion and garlic consumption and the effect these vegetables have on breast cancer. The results may be very positive for some women.

 

About the study 

 

Onions and garlic are part of the same plant family as chives, leeks and other species. Not only are they well-loved by many due to their rich flavor, but these vegetables may have disease-fighting characteristics.  Some evidence also links them to curing diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes.

 

In regards to cancer, multiple studies have examined diet and breast cancer risk. In summary, these studies discovered that the more of these vegetables individuals consumed, the lower their risk of developing various cancers became.

 

A team of researchers decided to look at the diets of women in Puerto Rico and compare their breast cancer risk. The team chose Puerto Rico for two reasons. Puerto Rico has lower breast cancer rates in comparison with the mainland U.S. A largely consumed condiment of Puerto Rico, “sofrito,” is also made mainly of onion and garlic.

 

The researchers published the results of the study in the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

 

How the researchers gathered data

 

Using clinical and hospital records, the team discovered 314 women who were breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2014. The women were between the ages of 30 and 79.  The study also included 346 control participants.

 

To join the control group, participants could not have had cancer with the exception of nonmelanoma skin cancer.  A  food frequency questionnaire told the researchers about dietary habits including onion and garlic consumption, and specifically the sofrito consumption of each participant.

 

The team adjusted their findings for factors such as body mass index, education, age, history, and smoking status to name a few.

 

Astounding findings 

 

The research team discovered that Sofrito consumers who ate it twice or more daily had a 67% lower breast cancer risk. The research team suspects that the flavonols and organosulfur compounds in onions and garlic may help prevent cancer. Specifically, the diallyl disulfide, S-allylcysteine, and diallyl sulfide in garlic and the alk(en)yl cysteine sulphoxides in onions have shown anticarcinogenic properties in studies involving humans and animals.

 

Although encouraging, the study did have the limitations of a small group of participants. The group of non-onion and garlic consumers was too small for comparison. Also, no standard Sofrito recipe exists. Sofrito is often homemade and includes additional ingredients such as tomatoes, bell peppers, black pepper, and cilantro.

 

Regardless, these results are encouraging to onion and garlic consumers hoping to eat a diet that may help prevent breast cancer.

 

Interested in learning about cancer care available right here in Lawton? Check out The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma!

 

Resource

 

1 Taylor & Francis Online. Gauri Desai, Michelle Schelske-Santos, Cruz M. Nazario, et al. Onion and Garlic Intake and Breast Cancer, a Case-Control Study in Puerto Rico.  12 August 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

In the Shadows of Pink: Male Breast Cancer

During this month, you may notice pink ribbons floating around and are probably aware that October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Understandably, many of us will think of this as being an awareness month for women, but what about male breast cancer? Of those that develop cancer, less than 1% of cases occur in men,1 but this is still not a small number of diagnoses. This means over 2,000 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and between 400 and 500 are expected to lose their battle to the disease each year.2

Given that men rarely think to look for signs of breast cancer, it is important that during this month of awareness we take the time to inform men of the symptoms, risk factors and next steps if they believe they may have a problem.

 

What are the symptoms of male breast cancer?

 

The signs of breast cancer in men start just as the signs do in women. A man may discover a painless lump or thicker area of breast tissue. Changes to the skin covering the breast may also occur such as redness, scaling, dimpling or puckering.

Less common are changes to the nipple, including redness or scaling, or a nipple that is suddenly turning inward. There may also be discharge from the nipple.

In cancer that has spread, men may also experience breast pain or bone pain. Lymph node swelling may occur near the breast, most commonly in or near the armpit.

 

What risk factors increase the chances of male breast cancer?

 

Breast cancer is more common among older men although it can develop at any age. Receiving previous radiation treatment to the breast or chest area may increase the risk of a man developing breast cancer. Diseases linked to high levels of estrogen in the body, such as cirrhosis (liver disease) or Klinefelter syndrome (a genetic disorder) can also increase the likeliness of breast cancer development.

Most men that develop breast cancer have at least one female relative who has been diagnosed also. Some men learn that they carry the gene mutation BRCA2 after being diagnosed. If multiple cases of cancer have occured in a family, a doctor may be able to recommend family members for genetic counseling to find out if they also carry the gene mutation and assess their risk. BRCA2 is also linked to prostate cancer.

 

What should a man do if he sees signs of breast cancer?

 

Diagnosed early, the chances of being cured are positive, much like that of female breast cancer. Unfortunately, Men are often not coached to look for symptoms to the extent that women are. Many men lose their battle to breast cancer because it was simply too late, so early diagnosis and receiving clinical and genetic tests can be crucial.

Upon first noticing symptoms, men should contact their primary care physician for a physical exam. The physician may also perform a clinical breast exam (CBE). A mammogram, blood tests, ultrasound and MRI may also be ordered. If a problem is suspected, biopsies are then the next step.

When diagnosed with breast cancer, mastectomy, the removal of the breast, is more commonly recommended for men than women. Men naturally have less breast tissue causing mastectomy to sometimes be the only option. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, may be advisable.

 

What are the emotional effects of male breast cancer?

 

Men that develop breast cancer may have an especially hard time coping with their diagnosis. Research on the psychological effects of male breast cancer noted anxiety, emasculation, embarrassment, and depression.3

“There are huge obstacles being a man with a ‘woman’s disease’, and it goes way beyond the normal stress and tribulations that consume all cancer patients,”4 stated Harvey Singer, male breast cancer survivor.

“We want to see things different for men moving forward. Breast cancer doesn’t care about gender. It will affect men and women the same,”4 responded Harvey’s sister, Vicki, who also has survived the disease.

Although not to the extent of support for women, support of male breast cancer patients is growing. A simple web search will result in an encouraging number of resources and organizations dedicated to supporting male patients and stopping this deadly disease in men. As more awareness is achieved for men struggling with breast cancer, perhaps more men will be able to come “out of the shadows of pink” and feel supported through this difficult disease.

 

 

Here at CCMH, we hope to honor those fighting bravely against breast cancer not only  throughout the month of October, but every day. We are proud to house The Leah M. Fitch Cancer Center of Southwest Oklahoma on our campus, offering medical oncology and radiation oncology services and hematology treatment on site. If you have any questions or concerns about cancer cancer, visit https://www.ccmhhealth.com/cancer-care/.

 

Sources

1 National Center for Biotechnology Information. 3 Feb. 2011. A case report of male breast cancer in a very young patient: What is changing?

2 American Cancer Society. 27 April 2018. Key Statistics for Breast Cancer in Men.

3 Kipling, Mike. Raplh, Jane E.M. and Callahan, Keith. National Center for Biotechnology Information. National Center for Biotechnology Information. 11 Feb. 2014. Psychological Impact of Male Breast Disorders: Literature Review and Survey Results.

4 HIS Breast Cancer Awareness. 2016. About HIS Breast Cancer Awareness.  

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

Faster Diagnostic Testing for Breast Cancer

Faster Diagnostic Testing for Breast Cancer

October is breast cancer awareness month and Comanche County Memorial Hospital, is the only hospital to offer the fastest testing for breast cancer in southwest Oklahoma.

In the past when a patient had a mammogram and a lump was found, the tissue taken from the biopsy would be sent out of state for pathologists to examine. That could take up to a week. But if the patient needed additional testing, it could take even longer.

Now CCMH offers this type of testing on site. Patients can have the diagnosis of cancer within 24 – 48 hours.

Dr. Carol Dittmann is the Chief of Pathology at Comanche County Memorial Hospital. She says decreasing the time they inform the patient of a diagnosis of cancer is crucial.

“From the point the patient has an abnormal mammogram to the point of seeing the oncologist and making treatment plans and decisions, we aim for that to be less than a week,” Dr. Dittmann said. “With this new technology in house, we are able to achieve that.”

Dr. Dittmann wants to remind people that breast cancer can happen to both men and women, and that this new technology can help everyone in the community. She says to keep up with your yearly mammograms and to get checked out if you feel a lump in your breasts.

To schedule an appointment to get a mammogram, you can call the McMahon Center for Breast Health at 580-250-5856.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Image

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Although there are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer, no one is immune from this disease. The McMahon Center for Breast Health, at Comanche County Memorial Hospital, is the first and only comprehensive breast cancer program in Southwest Oklahoma, providing a multidisiplinary approach to preventing, detecting, treating and ultimately beating cancer. The key to survival is early detection and access to state-of-the-art technology and treatment.

The McMahon Center for Breast Health features the most advanced diagnostic tools to include: 3D mammography, breast MRI and the only fellowship trained breast cancer radiologist in the region, giving our patients the greatest chance of early detection and survival. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, take the first step to survival and schedule your mammogram today by calling 580.250.5846