holiday arrangement

Bouncing Back After Holiday Eating

It takes a lot of discipline to control our holiday eating when there are sure to be multiple goodies around! If you gave up and overindulged, don’t beat yourself up about it! We’ve all been there! The start of a new year is always a great time to make a change. To help, here are eight tips to help you refocus on healthy eating. 

 

Get over the guilt

 

Continuing to dwell on it and punish your self does more harm than good. If negative emotions are a trigger for your unhealthy eating habits, this can start a tough to beat cycle. You may find yourself feeling guilty for overindulging, eating poorly to deal with the guilt, and then feeling guilty all over again. 

 

The best thing you can do is show yourself some grace. Acknowledging that you messed up and focusing on the reasons why you want to change are a great way to put your best foot forward. 

 

Stay busy 

 

Maybe you’re still enjoying some time off from work, or maybe the beginning of a new year just means a slower season for your particular career. Many of us overeat out of boredom. If this is the case for you, pay attention to what time of day this usually hits for you. Have some healthy snacks ready as well as a list of activities you can use to stay busy.

 

Plan for success

 

Finding time to plan out our meals is a struggle for many of us in our fast-paced world. However, meal prep can really add to your success. Planning your meals and grocery list will keep you from buying unhealthy snacks while in the store.  

 

Go easy on the social events 

 

If you find the temptation to overeat too great at events, now is a great time to say no to a few social events if you normally have a packed social calendar. If you can’t miss the event, plan out what you will eat if you know what’s on the menu. Is it something too caloric to take a chance on? Eat a good well-balanced meal beforehand and then practice saying, “No, thanks. I ate before I came” when offered something indulgent. 

 

Don’t let your hunger build 

 

 Starving yourself usually backfires! Don’t skip breakfast, and don’t go longer than 5 hours without eating. Beginning the day right with a healthy meal and well-spaced meals regulates your blood sugar, maximizes your metabolism, and evens out your appetite. 

 

Drink more water 

 

Water supports optimal metabolism. Some research shows it may naturally curb your appetite. It may also help you feel better faster. Drinking more water flushes out excess sodium. This quickly helps you de-bloat and gets your digestive system moving to relieve constipation. You should drink approximately half your weight in ounces of water. 

 

Don’t cut out carbs completely 

 

Carbs alone aren’t bad. It’s what you are getting your carbs from that matters. Not sure where to start? Start by pairing vegetables and lean proteins with a small amount of whole grains and a healthy fat. Avoid refined carbs such as sugar-sweetened beverages,  pastries, fruit juices, white pasta, white rice and white bread.

 

Make it part of your lifestyle 

 

Good intentions alone won’t cut it. A resolution alone won’t cut it. Healthy living happens when it is a habit. Take that new class at the gym you have been curious about, carry around that big cup full of water, and read up daily on some of your favorite fitness sites to keep your focus on healthy living. 

 

We wish you a very healthy and happy 2020! Have questions on how to meet your new health goals for the year? Reach out to a CCMH Provider

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Mediterranean diet plate with vegetables and olive oil

The Benefits of a Mediterranean Diet

The last few years have been overrun with fad diets such as the Keto Diet and Intermittent Fasting. However, concerns exist among medical professionals of using both of these fad diets long term.

 

One tried and true diet though, has proven effective at warding off stroke, heart attack and premature death. This diet is the Mediterranean Diet. Of course, the biggest payoff comes from adopting such a diet early in life. However, even making healthy dietary changes later in life will still provide positive health benefits.

 

May is National Mediterranean Diet Month. It is also American Stroke Month. To recognize the health benefits this diet can provide, including stroke prevention, we would like to discuss some of the important, research based facts about the diet. Then, we will also provide examples of how you can incorporate it into your daily lifestyle.

 

What is the Mediterranean Diet?

 

The Mediterranean Diet incorporates foods typically consumed in the countries in the region bordering the Mediterranean Sea. This includes vegetables, fish, fruits and whole grains, and limited unhealthy fats. A bit of olive oil, limited alcohol and nuts are also typical in the diet of this region.

 

What does research say about the Mediterranean Diet?

 

Researchers reviewed the dietary habits of more than 10,000 women in their 50s and 60s. Then, they analyzed their health 15 years later.

 

Women who followed a healthy diet in middle age were nearly 40% more likely to live beyond age 70 without chronic illness, physical or mental problems than those following less-healthy diets. 1 The healthiest women ate more fish, plant based foods and whole grains; consumed less red and processed meats; and drank limited alcohol.

 

Do dietary changes midlife really make that much difference?

 

The foods eaten in the Mediterranean Diet are known to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress. These are the two general pathways underlying many age-related health conditions and diseases. Other improvements include better glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

 

Whole grains, fruits, legumes and vegetables are also packed with fiber. Fiber slows digestion and also aids in controlling blood sugar. Monounsaturated fats found in fish, nuts and olive oils can have anti-inflammatory effects, which may help stave off heart disease and many other conditions.

 

Research has also shown that this type of eating pattern can help lower cholesterol,  improve rheumatoid arthritis, aid in weight loss, and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and various types of cancer. 2

 

What are the basics of a Mediterranean-type diet?

 

Eat fish at least twice a week.

Base meals on fruits, vegetables, whole grains ( brown rice, quinoa whole wheat bread,), olive oil, nuts, beans, legumes (lentils,beans and dried peas), seeds, herbs and spices.

Consume moderate portions of poultry and eggs every two days or weekly.

Eat moderate portions of cheese and yogurt.

Eat red meat sparingly or limit to three-ounce portions.

Drink ample water each day, and drink alcohol in moderation.

 

What are some easy ways I can change my current diet?

 

Limit high-fat dairy by switching to 1% or skim milk.

Add fruits and vegetables to recipes and have them as a snack.

Sauté food in olive oil instead of butter.

Choose whole grains over refined breads and pastas.

 

 

Don’t let new dietary goals overwhelm you. Transition gradually so your new eating style becomes an actual lifestyle change.

 

Have questions about achieving your health goals? Make an appointment today with a CCMH provider. Search for one in our directory found here: ccmhhealth.com/directory.

 

Sources 

1 Annals of Internal Medicine. Cécilia Samieri, PhD; Qi Sun, MD, ScD; Mary K. Townsend, ScD; Stephanie E. Chiuve, ScD; Olivia I. Okereke, MD; Walter C. Willett, MD, DrPH; Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH; Francine Grodstein, ScD. The Association Between Dietary Patterns at Midlife and Health in Aging: An Observational Study. 5 Nov. 2013.

2 Harvard Health Publishing. Heidi Godman. Adopt a Mediterranean diet now for better health later.  6 Nov. 203.

 

Disclaimer

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.