holiday arrangement

Bouncing Back After Holiday Eating

It takes a lot of discipline to control our holiday eating when there are sure to be multiple goodies around! If you gave up and overindulged, don’t beat yourself up about it! We’ve all been there! The start of a new year is always a great time to make a change. To help, here are eight tips to help you refocus on healthy eating. 

 

Get over the guilt

 

Continuing to dwell on it and punish your self does more harm than good. If negative emotions are a trigger for your unhealthy eating habits, this can start a tough to beat cycle. You may find yourself feeling guilty for overindulging, eating poorly to deal with the guilt, and then feeling guilty all over again. 

 

The best thing you can do is show yourself some grace. Acknowledging that you messed up and focusing on the reasons why you want to change are a great way to put your best foot forward. 

 

Stay busy 

 

Maybe you’re still enjoying some time off from work, or maybe the beginning of a new year just means a slower season for your particular career. Many of us overeat out of boredom. If this is the case for you, pay attention to what time of day this usually hits for you. Have some healthy snacks ready as well as a list of activities you can use to stay busy.

 

Plan for success

 

Finding time to plan out our meals is a struggle for many of us in our fast-paced world. However, meal prep can really add to your success. Planning your meals and grocery list will keep you from buying unhealthy snacks while in the store.  

 

Go easy on the social events 

 

If you find the temptation to overeat too great at events, now is a great time to say no to a few social events if you normally have a packed social calendar. If you can’t miss the event, plan out what you will eat if you know what’s on the menu. Is it something too caloric to take a chance on? Eat a good well-balanced meal beforehand and then practice saying, “No, thanks. I ate before I came” when offered something indulgent. 

 

Don’t let your hunger build 

 

 Starving yourself usually backfires! Don’t skip breakfast, and don’t go longer than 5 hours without eating. Beginning the day right with a healthy meal and well-spaced meals regulates your blood sugar, maximizes your metabolism, and evens out your appetite. 

 

Drink more water 

 

Water supports optimal metabolism. Some research shows it may naturally curb your appetite. It may also help you feel better faster. Drinking more water flushes out excess sodium. This quickly helps you de-bloat and gets your digestive system moving to relieve constipation. You should drink approximately half your weight in ounces of water. 

 

Don’t cut out carbs completely 

 

Carbs alone aren’t bad. It’s what you are getting your carbs from that matters. Not sure where to start? Start by pairing vegetables and lean proteins with a small amount of whole grains and a healthy fat. Avoid refined carbs such as sugar-sweetened beverages,  pastries, fruit juices, white pasta, white rice and white bread.

 

Make it part of your lifestyle 

 

Good intentions alone won’t cut it. A resolution alone won’t cut it. Healthy living happens when it is a habit. Take that new class at the gym you have been curious about, carry around that big cup full of water, and read up daily on some of your favorite fitness sites to keep your focus on healthy living. 

 

We wish you a very healthy and happy 2020! Have questions on how to meet your new health goals for the year? Reach out to a CCMH Provider

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

boy playing with toys

Most Dangerous Toys of 2019

There is nothing quite like the joy of the holidays. The gatherings, the decorations, the gifts- these are just a few of the many things we all enjoy. However, that joy can quickly dissipate if a toy your child was eager to unwrap causes an injury! Every year, World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc. (WATCH) releases its list of most dangerous toys. We hope this information helps you to have a happy and safe holiday season.

 

The Top Ten Most Dangerous Toys of 2019

 

Note: The toys on the list are not the only hazardous toys on the market. Please use them as examples of hazards you should be aware of when making toy purchases. 

 

Viga Pull Along Caterpillar

 

Even though “crib toys” must adhere to the industry’s standard of strings with less than 12 “, pull toys are allowed to use cords of up to 24”. This makes this pull toy as well as others a strangulation and entanglement hazard for young children.

 

Learning Resource’s Spike the Fine Motor Hedgehog

 

This toy comes with 3.5″ removable, plastic quills for children 18 months+ to practice fine motor skills as they remove and replace the pieces. Children at this age are, of course, very prone to putting small items in their mouths. The plastic pieces can create a choking hazard.

 

Nickelodeon Frozen Treats Slime

 

Slime is one of the most popular toys among young children this year. However, many slime kits, including this one, come with a warning that it contains chemicals that can be harmful when misused. Marketing slime kits to appear as food items adds to the danger. Young children may be tempted to eat these tasty “treats”, but they should not be ingested.

 

Spin Master’s Bunchems Bunch’n Build 

 

This toy includes small balls designed to stick together so children can build whatever their imagination creates. However, not only are these small parts a choking hazard, but they also may cause entanglement issues in hair. If you allow your child to play with this toy, be sure to keep hair pulled back and pets away.

 

Hasbro’s Power Rangers Electronic Cheetah Claw

 

This toy may not be hazardous for your child but is for anyone else around them! The claw is inserted over the arm and is made of hard plastic. Discuss playing safely with this toy with your child, away from others, pets and breakable items.

 

Schylling’s Diecast School Bus

 

This toy does come with a choking hazard warning for small children. However, at first glance, it may seem harmless. The problem lies with the removable, firm rubber tires. This type of manufacturing is very common with toy vehicles and poses a serious choking threat.

 

Anstoy’s Electronic Toy Gun

 

This toy gun looks very real at first glance. Replicas of guns have sadly led to numerous, tragic deaths over the years. Please use extreme caution if allowing your children to play with toy weaponry.

 

Flybar’s Pogo Trick Board

 

This “pogo board” includes a large, high bouncing ball for children to stand on either side of while causing the board to bounce. Protective gear including knee and elbow pads, and helmets are a must with this toy!

 

Douglas Company’s Yeti Plush

 

This adorable stuffed animal includes long hair which may be ingested leading to aspiration. This toy is a great example that age recommendations are not always well thought out. This toy is labeled with a recommendation of 24 months and up.

 

 

Even if none of these exact toys are on your list, we hope these examples help you think twice before you assume all toys labeled as “safe” for your child’s age actually are. We wish you a happy and safe holiday season!

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.