psoriasis

Do You Have Psoriasis?

Red, itchy scaly patches- anyone with psoriasis knows how uncomfortable the condition can make you feel. This non-contagious skin disease occurs mostly on the scalp, trunk, elbows, and knees.

Psoriasis is a chronic condition with no cure. It may subside for periods of time or even go into remission. However, cycles of the disease may occur for a few weeks or months. Your doctor may recommend certain medications or lifestyle changes to manage the disease.

 

Risk factors

Anyone may develop psoriasis. According to the Mayo Clinic, around 1/3 of cases  begin in the pediatric years. The following factors can increase your risk:

Smoking

Tobacco increases not only the risk and plays a role in disease development, but it increases the severity of psoriasis. Smoking may also play a role in the initial development of the disease.

Family history

Having a parent with psoriasis increases your risk of getting psoriasis yourself. Having two parents with psoriasis increases your risk even more.

Stress

Stress impacts your immune system. High levels of stress may increase your risk of psoriasis.

 

What causes psoriasis? 

Research demonstrates that psoriasis may cause the skin to regenerate at faster than normal rates. The rapid growth of cells causes the red patches of skin. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis.

We do not know what causes this abnormality in the immune system.

 

What are the symptoms of psoriasis?

All psoriasis patients are affected differently by the disease. The following are common symptoms:

Stiff and swollen joints

Small scaling spots (more common in children)

Cracked, dry skin that may bleed or itch

Soreness, burning, and itching

Nails that are pitted, thickened, or ridged

If you suspect you have psoriasis or your condition worsens, reach out to a CCMH Provider today!

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

kid with covid 19

FAQS: Covid-19 and Children

You have probably heard that children are less susceptible to COVID-19. However, it is understandable that parents are concerned for their children in regard to a novel virus that we are still learning about. Here is a summary of frequently asked questions parents have asked about the virus based on research provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

 

Should my child wear a mask?

Children 2 years or older should wear a mask or cloth covering over their nose and mouth when in public. Of course, getting a toddler to wear a mask may present a challenge. Having a fabric they choose, letting them “help” make their mask if you make a homemade mask, and explaining that you will wear one too may help.

The CDC recommends wearing a mask in addition to social distancing, NOT in place of social distancing. Remember that the incubation period for the virus is around two weeks in some cases. So even if your child has no symptoms, wearing a covering could protect them from spreading the virus if he or she is asymptomatic.

 

Do children with COVID-19 have different symptoms than adults?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are the same for adults and children. Children, however, usually have milder symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, including cough, fever and runny nose. Some have also reported vomiting and diarrhea.

Parents of children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs should be cautious. We are still learning if certain conditions put children at higher risk.

 

How do I keep my child safe during the COVID-19 outbreak?

Practice the same advice given to adults. Limit your child’s contact with others outside of the home and practice social distancing. Limit your child’s interaction with elder adults and those at high risk as much as possible. Although COVID-19 may be milder for children, children often spread illnesses due to not having a hygiene routine.

Help children to develop a good hygiene routine by observing you. For younger children, you may which to teach them songs about handwashing or show them cartoons about developing a good hygiene routine. Slightly older children may benefit from videos

Children should not be going to playdates and other activities. If you must take your child to daycare because you are required to work outside of your home in an essential business, ensure your daycare is working to maintain your child’s safety at this time. The CDC has given special guidance for how daycare centers should operate during the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

No matter what, try to remain calm and limit your young child’s exposure to media. This is a difficult, confusing time for all of us. Maintaining a happy home and making the most of the situation by creating good memories of this time for children is so important. If you need ideas of how to thrive while isolating, check out this recent article.

 

For more resources on COVID-19, visit: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

family in social isolation

Taking Care of Yourself and Your Family During Social Isolation

Due to the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19), many individuals and families are now finding themselves dealing with a whole new way of living in social isolation due to work being moved home and/ or schools closing. During these uncertain times, taking care of yourself mentally, emotionally, and physically is more important than ever!

 

Here are ten tips to help you navigate these challenging times.

 

Create a routine

 

Having a few “vacation days” from the norm can be enjoyable at first. Use the time to let yourself or your children enjoy sleeping in, wearing pajamas all day, watching movies or playing video or board games.

However, having a routine reduces stress on yourself and children. Lay our clothes and prepare meals for the next day. Establish hours for educational time as well as chores if your children are old enough. The more like “normal” this time feels, the easier it will be on all.

 

Be careful of what your kids overhear

 

Kids often pick up more adult conversation than you realize. You may want to save turning on the news until after they go to bed and limit the adult conversation they are exposed to regarding the coronavirus.

They may be too old for you to completely shield them from it, however. Just because they don’t ask you about it, doesn’t mean they aren’t internalizing some fear. Have conversations with your child as appropriate and let them ask questions. It may be a good time to have important science lessons with younger children about germs and how to prevent illnesses.

 

Accomplish something new

 

Now may be a great time to find some video tutorials and learn a new skill or hobby. Try a new workout, write the book you’ve always planned to but never find time for, learn a new instrument, or master a new recipe. You may even wish to include your children in learning a new skill you haven’t found the time for amidst a busy schedule.

 

Make a simple, flexible meal plan

 

To keep the spread of coronavirus to a minimum, it is best to limit your grocery trips as much as possible. Yet, many individuals are finding it difficult to find some basic necessities, finding availability for grocery pick up, and having to shop multiple stores.

To keep your shopping as simple as possible, make a list of basic but healthy meals and a list of needed ingredients. Attempt to buy the ingredients as you find them and rotate through this meal plan.

Now is also a great time to reach out to friends and neighbors that may have farm-fresh produce and meat. We are fortunate to be in an area where we have an abundance of possibilities!

 

Form a strategy for working efficiently

 

Parents that work from home regularly love the extra time with their children. However, working from home has its challenges and disadvantages. To be successful, it takes a lot of flexibility on the part of the employee and employer as well as time management strategies. Some parents get up before their children and work an hour or two. Some work an hour or two after bed.

Prepping the night before helps as well. Prep snacks, meals and sippy cups. This includes your own drinks and snacks.

Plan a fun activity for small children and rotate toys to maximize playtime.

 

Remember that the outdoors are not canceled

 

Some fresh air, sunshine, and activity does the body good! Just because you shouldn’t be in large groups of people right now, doesn’t mean you can’t be outside. Play in your yard if you have a nice area to do so, or plan an outing with your family. Now may be a great time to discover a new park or take advantage of a nice spring day and visit the wildlife refuge.

 

Give each other space when necessary

 

Constantly being together has its challenges. Create boundaries to ensure everyone gets the peace and quiet they need. You could create a fun space for children with bean bags, or other alternative seating or even make a tent with blankets. Set aside an hour a day where everyone reads or listens to music in their rooms.

Parents, find some time to unwind and enjoy the quiet alone after kids go to bed. You deserve it!

 

Clean

 

Not only is it a good idea to sanitize to ward off illness, but decluttering is a great way to improve your mood. Psychologists say it is even important for your mental health. Now may be a great time to straighten up the garage, organize your home office, or accomplish whatever other cleaning task that always gets put off. You never know what items you are ready to get rid of that someone needs during this time.

 

Find your outlet

 

There are many ways to help yourself combat all the emotions in these times of uncertainty.

Journaling is a great outlet that boosts your mood.

Exercising is another mood booster which you should be doing anyway to stay healthy!

Doing something kind for others is also an excellent way to put a positive spin on the situation.
Offer to pick up groceries and other necessities for an elderly neighbor or make cards for elderly patients quarantined in local nursing facilities. Help stock a local food pantry since many children are unable to get a needed meal at school at this time.

 

Keep in touch with friends and family

 

Although it isn’t the same as a good old fashioned gettogether, technology does help when we are in isolation away from dear friends and family members. Social media, emails, texts and FaceTime make it easier for keeping up with those we care about.

 

 

Check out how we are working to keep our community safe here: ccmhhealth.com/coronavirus-annoucement.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.