boy playing with toys

Most Dangerous Toys of 2019

There is nothing quite like the joy of the holidays. The gatherings, the decorations, the gifts- these are just a few of the many things we all enjoy. However, that joy can quickly dissipate if a toy your child was eager to unwrap causes an injury! Every year, World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc. (WATCH) releases its list of most dangerous toys. We hope this information helps you to have a happy and safe holiday season.

 

The Top Ten Most Dangerous Toys of 2019

 

Note: The toys on the list are not the only hazardous toys on the market. Please use them as examples of hazards you should be aware of when making toy purchases. 

 

Viga Pull Along Caterpillar

 

Even though “crib toys” must adhere to the industry’s standard of strings with less than 12 “, pull toys are allowed to use cords of up to 24”. This makes this pull toy as well as others a strangulation and entanglement hazard for young children.

 

Learning Resource’s Spike the Fine Motor Hedgehog

 

This toy comes with 3.5″ removable, plastic quills for children 18 months+ to practice fine motor skills as they remove and replace the pieces. Children at this age are, of course, very prone to putting small items in their mouths. The plastic pieces can create a choking hazard.

 

Nickelodeon Frozen Treats Slime

 

Slime is one of the most popular toys among young children this year. However, many slime kits, including this one, come with a warning that it contains chemicals that can be harmful when misused. Marketing slime kits to appear as food items adds to the danger. Young children may be tempted to eat these tasty “treats”, but they should not be ingested.

 

Spin Master’s Bunchems Bunch’n Build 

 

This toy includes small balls designed to stick together so children can build whatever their imagination creates. However, not only are these small parts a choking hazard, but they also may cause entanglement issues in hair. If you allow your child to play with this toy, be sure to keep hair pulled back and pets away.

 

Hasbro’s Power Rangers Electronic Cheetah Claw

 

This toy may not be hazardous for your child but is for anyone else around them! The claw is inserted over the arm and is made of hard plastic. Discuss playing safely with this toy with your child, away from others, pets and breakable items.

 

Schylling’s Diecast School Bus

 

This toy does come with a choking hazard warning for small children. However, at first glance, it may seem harmless. The problem lies with the removable, firm rubber tires. This type of manufacturing is very common with toy vehicles and poses a serious choking threat.

 

Anstoy’s Electronic Toy Gun

 

This toy gun looks very real at first glance. Replicas of guns have sadly led to numerous, tragic deaths over the years. Please use extreme caution if allowing your children to play with toy weaponry.

 

Flybar’s Pogo Trick Board

 

This “pogo board” includes a large, high bouncing ball for children to stand on either side of while causing the board to bounce. Protective gear including knee and elbow pads, and helmets are a must with this toy!

 

Douglas Company’s Yeti Plush

 

This adorable stuffed animal includes long hair which may be ingested leading to aspiration. This toy is a great example that age recommendations are not always well thought out. This toy is labeled with a recommendation of 24 months and up.

 

 

Even if none of these exact toys are on your list, we hope these examples help you think twice before you assume all toys labeled as “safe” for your child’s age actually are. We wish you a happy and safe holiday season!

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

young football player

Football Safety Tips

Many parents have mixed feelings about their children playing contact sports such as football and rightfully so. Injuries in these sports are common. There is nothing you can do to prevent 100% of football injuries from happening. However, from wearing the proper gear to ensuring your child follows certain techniques during practice and on game day, there are many great tips you can follow to prevent a good number of football-related incidents. 

 

Football gear for safety 

If you have the option to purchase your child’s helmet yourself, familiarize yourself with the helmet safety guidelines determined by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE)

Helmets should have a thick layer of padding surrounded by a hard plastic outer shell. They should also have facemasks produced from coated carbon steel that are secured to the helmet. Depending on the position your child plays, his or her coach may recommend a particular type of facemask. Lastly, helmets should be secured with a chin strap and protective chin cup. 

Additionally, all players should have shoulder pads with a hard plastic shell and thick padding. Pants should have padding on the knees, hips, tailbone, and thighs, and all players should wear a mouthguard. Male players should wear an athletic supporter with a cup to prevent testicular injuries.

Each league has its own rules regarding the types of shoes and cleats players can use. 

Other items that you might want to consider include “flak jackets” to protect the abdomen and rib cage, forearm pads, padded neck rolls, and padded or non-padded gloves.

If your child must wear glasses during football, be sure that they’re shatterproof. 

 

Football training tips

During practice, the coach should emphasize safe and fair practices among players. Physical contact should be less during practice including helmet-to-helmet and helmet-to-body contact. He or she should insist on all players wearing the correct protective gear as well. Coaches should teach players proper techniques including how to tackle, how to absorb a tackle, and how to fall safely to the ground when tackled. 

To prevent injuries, take your child for a sports physical before starting a new sport. Remind him to stretch and warm up before playing. Overuse injuries can be avoided by playing different sports throughout the year. 

Ensure your child drinks plenty of fluids before and after games and practices, especially on hot days. 

 

Safe Game Tips 

Discuss the safety rules implemented during practice with your child and following them during games. Encourage your child to not argue with referees and be respectful to everyone. Encourage him to stay calm and let his coach and referee know if another player attempts to injure him on purpose. 

 

 

Lawton Community Health Centers (LCHC) located in Lawton, Comanche, Elgin, Marlow, and Cache communities are available to help with school and sports physicals, verify immunizations are current and discuss any other medical or nutrition concerns with parents. For more information or to make an appointment with one of our LCHC clinics please call our Provider Referral Line at 580.510.7030.

 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

fireworks in the sky

Fireworks Safety

The holidays make up many of our best memories. No one wants those wonderful memories tainted by an unsafe mistake, yet nearly 12,000 people received medical care due to fireworks injuries in 2017. 1 Here are our tips to ensure your family enjoys a holiday that is both fun and safe! 

 

The dangers of fireworks

 

Without proper use, fireworks can cause eye injuries and burns. Of course the safest way to deal with fireworks is not to set them off at your home and only attend public displays. However, many of us can’t resist the urge to enjoy them at our homes. Check with your city or police department to learn the days and hours fireworks are allowed. 

 

Fireworks safety tips

 

Check your fireworks labels. Legal fireworks have the manufacturer’s name and directions. Illegal fireworks do not have a label. Although banned in 1966, illegal fireworks still account for many firework related injuries. Never try to make your own fireworks!

 

Wear eye protection. 

 

Use fireworks outside only. Keep a bucket of water and water hose close in case of accidents.

 

Don’t hold fireworks in your hand or have any body part over them while lighting. 

 

Keep your distance from others setting off fireworks. You never know when fireworks may shoot in the wrong direction. 

 

Also, never point a firework at someone or throw it in their direction. 

 

You should store fireworks  in a cool, dry place. 

Don’t carry fireworks in your pocket. The friction may ignite them. 

 

Point fireworks away from homes. Keep them away from brush and leaves and flammable substances as well.

 

Light one firework at a time. Never place them in a container when lighting. 

 

Never relight a dud.

 

Soak all fireworks in a bucket of water before placing  them in the trash can.

 

Don’t forget to secure your furry friends. Pets should stay indoors to reduce the chance of injury or running away. 

 

Fireworks safety for children 

 

Be sure to discuss fireworks safety and your expectations with your children. 

 

Sparklers are one of the most common injury-causing fireworks. If you allow your child to handle them, choose the kind that have a wooden handle so they are less likely to burn their hands. Try to keep them out of the wind so the sparks do not blow back on them. Also, ensure that they hold them away from their face, hair, and clothing.  It may surprise you to know that sparklers reach nearly 2,000 degrees and can cause serious burns! 

 

Don’t allow children to pick up fireworks pieces after your event. Some may still be hot or ignited. They may explode without warning.

 

If an injury happens

 

In the event of serious injury, seek immediate medical care. We’re here for you at the Drewry Family Emergency Center at Comanche County Memorial Hospital .

 

If an eye injury happens

 

Do not  touch or rub they eye. This may cause more injury. 

Don’t flush the eye out with water or apply ointment. 

Remove the bottom of a paper cup and place it over the eye to protect it. 

Seek immediate medical attention. 

 

If someone receives a burn

 

Remove clothing from the affected area.

Seek immediate medical attention. 

 

We hope you have a happy and safe Independence Day! 

 

Source

1 Consumer Product Safety Commission. 2017 Fireworks Annual Report.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Do You Know Your Tips for Halloween Safety?

From cool costumes to sugary treats, kids can’t wait for Halloween to arrive. Halloween is one of the most anticipated days of the year, yet it is important to also be very cautious and know some tips for Halloween safety. In Fact, the National Safety Council reports that children are twice as likely to be killed in a car accident on Halloween than any other day of the year. 1 Here are a few tips so you can make the most of your Halloween holiday and avoid an emergency visit to see us here at CCMH!

Costume Safety

Be aware of the following to help children avoid accidents involving their costumes:

  • Consider buying light-colored costumes that are easy to see at night.
  • Add reflective tape or glow-in-the-dark tape to your child’s costume and to their trick-or-treat bag. Some children enjoy carrying glow sticks or flashlights as well. Ensure your child knows not to break into the glow stick because the contents are toxic.
  • Make sure all costumes are flame-retardant. If you make a costume, use nylon or polyester materials.
  • Accidents can occur not only because children are distracted on Halloween, but because some costumes make it difficult to see. Consider using non-toxic face paint or makeup instead of masks.
  • It is illegal to sell colored or decorative contact lenses. Only use them if a licensed optometrist prescribed them. When not prescribed and ensured for safety, colored contacts may cause inflammation and pain and serious infection, which may cause permanent vision loss.
  • Talk to your child about how to be safe with any costume props by avoiding swinging or throwing them. Props that are plastic, lightweight and flexible are best.
  • For younger children, put their name, your name and contact information on a notecard in their pocket.
Trick or Treating Safety
  • Halloween is not the best night to let an unexperienced driver occupy the roadway. Compromise by allowing older kids to walk the neighborhood with their friends but pick them up and drop them off at designated locations. Also know the route they plan to walk beforehand.
  • Remind your kids to put electronic devices down and pay close attention when crossing roadways.
  • Teach your children to use crosswalks, sidewalks and lit areas and never assume drivers will stop. When possible, tell them to try to make eye contact with drivers so they can be certain they are seen.
  • Although they are excited, remind your children to walk, not run. Running in the dark often leads to serious accidents.
  • Discuss safety tips concerning strangers with your children. Remind them not to go up to houses that do not have the porch light on and not to enter the home or vehicle of strangers.
Candy Safety
  • A good meal prior to trick-or-treating will discourage your child from filling up on Halloween treats.
  • Fortunately, candy tampering is rare. However, help your child check all treats to make sure seals are not broken and packages have no holes or tearing.
  • Throw away spoiled items and homemade treats that were made by strangers.
  • Ensure young children do not have candy that may cause choking.
  • Make sure children know not to eat any candy until they are home so you can inspect it.
  • Halloween can be challenging if your child has food allergies. It’s important that parents closely examine Halloween candy.
  • Always read the labels on treats. Many popular candies contain common allergens, such as peanuts or tree nuts, egg, soy wheat or milk.
  • If the ingredients aren’t listed, hold a treat “exchange” with other friends.
  • Candy is often high risk and contains trace amounts of common allergens because it is usually manufactured in factories that produce many different products.
  • “Fun size” candy bars sometimes contain different ingredients or be made on different equipment than the regular size candies, meaning that brands your child previously ate without problems could cause a reaction.
Prepare Your Home for Trick or Treaters
  • Ensure the safety  of your home for other children too.
  • Remove anything that could cause them to trip or fall.
  • Make sure the lights are on outside your house and light the walkway to your door.
  • Keep pets away from trick-or-treaters.

We hope you have a safe and happy Halloween!

Sources

1 National Safety Council. 2018. Halloween Safety On and Off the Road.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.