man eating

Are You at Risk for Stomach Cancer?

When you think of cancer, stomach cancer may not be the first type of cancer that comes to mind. However, around 27,500 Americans will receive a stomach cancer diagnosis this year. Also, over 17,000 of these patients will be men. It is also estimated that over 11,000 deaths will occur from stomach cancer in the U.S. this year. 1 As we observe Stomach Cancer Awareness Month, we hope to make patients more aware of the signs and symptoms of the disease. 

 

How does stomach cancer develop?

 

Stomach cancer tends to develop over a period of years. It begins with pre-cancerous changes often occurring in the inner lining of the stomach. Early changes rarely cause symptoms and therefore often go undetected.

 

What are the risk factors of stomach cancer?

 

Gender. Men are twice as likely to develop this cancer compared to women.

 

Genetics/family history. Those who have had immediate family members with stomach cancer are at a higher risk of the disease. Furthermore, certain inherited genetic disorders can increase the risk. This includes Lynch syndrome, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). 

 

Bacteria. A common bacterium, Helicobacter pylori (also called H. pylori) causes stomach ulcers and inflammation. It is also one of the main causes of stomach cancer. Your doctor may recommend testing for H. pylori if you have an immediate family member who has been diagnosed with stomach cancer or an H. pylori infection. 

 

Age. It occurs mostly in people older than 55. 

 

Race. Stomach cancer is more common in those of African American, Hispanic, and Asian descent.

 

Tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco use and high alcohol consumption may increase the risk of developing stomach cancer.

 

Diet. Consuming fresh fruits and vegetables may help lower risk. Eating foods high in salt has also been linked to an increased risk of stomach cancer. 

 

Previous stomach surgery and health conditions. People who have had pernicious anemia, stomach surgery, or achlorhydria have a higher risk of stomach cancer. Pernicious anemia is a severe decrease in red blood cells that keeps the stomach from properly absorbing vitamin B12. Achlorhydria is a lack of hydrochloric acid in the gastric juices. Hydrochloric acid helps to digest food.

 

Obesity. Excess body weight may increase the risk for men. It is unknown if this is a factor for women.

 

Occupational hazard. Exposure to certain fumes and dust may increase the risk.

 

What are the common signs and symptoms of stomach cancer?

 

Signs and symptoms may include:

 

Feeling bloated after eating

Fatigue

Severe, persistent heartburn

Feeling full after eating a small amount

Unexplained, persistent nausea

Severe indigestion that is always present

Stomach pain

Persistent vomiting

Unintentional weight loss

 

How can I prevent stomach cancer?

 

You can reduce your risk by:

 

Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink

Avoiding eating pickled and smoked foods and salted meat.

Not using tobacco products.

Eating a well-balanced diet including fresh fruits and vegetables and whole-grain foods.

Maintaining a healthy weight.

 

 

Do you have other questions or concerns about your stomach cancer risk? Reach out to a CCMH Physician today. Find one today by visiting our online directory: ccmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Source

1 Cancer.Net. Stomach Cancer: Statistics. Jan. 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

morning person drinking cofee

Sleep Habits Affect Breast Cancer?

Sleep is important for the immune system to work and prevent or overcome illness, but how important? Important enough to prevent cancer?  A recent study published in The BMJ suggests this may be so. In fact, women who are morning people may have a lower chance of developing breast cancer. 

 

The study analyzed 180,216 women from the UK Biobank and 228,951 women from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The researchers reported that morning persons seem to have a protection from breast cancer. Furthermore, sleeping more than 7-8 hours per night could even have an “adverse effect” on the risk of breast cancer. 1

 

The facts of the study

 

Although lifestyle factors which may have a positive effect on breast cancer prevention,  the effects of sleep are small, compared with other risk factors for breast cancer, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and BMI. In fact, the research showed that women with a morning preference had a less than 1% lower risk of developing breast cancer when compared with women with an evening preference. 

 

A factor that has a less than 1% effect on women’s breast cancer risk seems so minimal. This means less than 10 women out of 1,000 may develop breast cancer due to their sleep preference. Yet when it comes to preventing a major killer of women, we can’t help but wonder the significance this factor may play. 

 

Also, the researchers noted that attempting to modify sleep habits does not seem to eventually lead to a decrease in the risk of breast cancer. For example, there is no association between sleep issues as insomnia and breast cancer risk. 

 

Following sleep schedule likely benefits metabolic health

 

Even though the link between sleep and breast cancer in this particular study were minimal, the results are probably not surprising to most health professionals. Prior research has demonstrated that those with a regular pattern of waking up and going to bed are less likely to be obese, have high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. A future exploration of the stresses on our biological clock is needed.

 

For women age forty and older, the first line of defense against breast cancer is annual mammograms. To learn more, visit ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/.

 

Source

 

1 Rebecca C Richmond,  Emma L Anderson, Hassan S Dashti, et al. The BMJ. Investigating causal relations between sleep traits and risk of breast cancer in women: mendelian randomisation study. 26 Jun. 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

Content is frequently updated, however, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

red meat hamburger

Swapping Red Meat for Chicken May Lower Cancer Risk 

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women aside from skin cancer. It affects around 1 in 8 women in the United States during their lifetime. 1

 

However, many factors influence the chance of a woman developing breast cancer. Due to the variety of these factors, some which are environmental and lifestyle choices, causes can be difficult to pinpoint. 

 

That is to say, recent research often focuses on factors that lead to cancer which we can control such as nutrition. 

 

A recent study in The International Journal of Cancer reports that consuming poultry instead of red meat may lower breast cancer risk after gathering data from over 40,000 women. 2

 

Red meat and breast cancer?

 

The data, derived from the Sister Study, included participants from the U.S. and Puerto Rico who were 35–74 years old. Participants also provided information that included their lifestyle factors, medical history, height, weight, diet, and other demographic information.

 

The participants also reported details about their food consumption, including type of meat consumption, portion sizes and level of “doneness” of meat. 

 

Throughout the study, the research team reported 1,536 cases of breast cancer.

 

At the end of the study, the scientists concluded that women who ate more red meat had a 23% higher chance of developing breast cancer. 2

 

However, previous studies have not produced similar results. Some researchers have found no association, whereas others have shown a weak relationship between meat consumption and cancer. 

 

Poultry and breast cancer risk?

 

The scientists calculated that those who ate the most poultry had a 15% lower risk of developing breast cancer compared with those who ate little poultry. 

 

The scientists also controlled for a range of factors, including level of physical activity, household income, family history of cancer, race,  vegetable consumption, dairy consumption, body mass index (BMI), birth control usage, and also alcohol consumption. Even with these factors considered, the results were still significant.

 

The effects of cooking methods on cancer risk 

 

An earlier study discovered high consumptions of fried chicken increased breast cancer risk while intake of skinless chicken reduced risk.

 

A further study concluded that chicken cooked by any method was “significantly protective” against breast cancer. 3 The researchers in the latest study, however, found no link between the way people cooked meat and breast cancer risk.

 

However, other researchers report no links between meat consumption and breast cancer. 

 

As always, research must continue before we reach a solid conclusion about the role of meat in breast cancer.

 

 

 

Limitations of the study

 

Although the study had a large number of participants, limitations, of course, exist. For example, the study was observational. It cannot easily explain cause and effect.

 

Furthermore, dietary information was only recorded at the beginning of the study. Participants may have had dietary changes throughout the nearly seven years of the study. 

 

CCMH is proud to offer cancer care right here on our campus at the Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma. To learn more, visit their website at ccswok.com

 

Sources 

1 American Cancer Society. How Common is Breast Cancer? 18 September 2019.

2 International Journal of Cancer. Jamie J. Lo, Yong-Moon Mark Park, Rashmi Sinha and Dale P. Sandler. Association Between Meat Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer: Findings from the Sister Study. 2019.

3 Science Direct. Alacro L. Ronco, Eduardo De Stefani, Alicia Fabra.White meat intake and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Montevideo, Uruguay. 20 May 2oo2.

 

Disclaimer 

 The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

Content is frequently updated, however, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

mom and daughter on bench

Your Breast Cancer Risk as You Age

The American Cancer Society has named  breast cancer as the most common type of cancer among American women other than non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States battle breast cancer at some point during their lifetime. 

 

Typically, we think of diseases such as breast cancer a problem experienced among older women.  It is true that as you age, your chance of developing breast cancer also increases. However, women may develop breast cancer at any age. 

 

In this article, we will examine the impact age has on breast cancer. 

 

At what age do most women receive their breast cancer diagnosis? 

 

Women over the age of 50 are more likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis. In fact, the median age for this diagnosis is 62 years 1 old with most doctors giving a breast cancer diagnosis to women between the age of 55 and 64.  As we age, abnormal changes in cells are more likely to occur.

 

What is the risk for each age group? 

 

The SEER Cancer Statistics Review annually assess the risk of a woman developing breast cancer during her lifetime. According to the SEER, the risk that an American  female develops breast cancer within the next 10 years is:

 

0.44% at age 30

1.47% at age 40

2.38% at age 50

3.56% at age 60

3.82% at age 70 2

 

What age were women who received a breast cancer diagnosis in recent years? 

 

The SEER report showed 437,722 women received their breast cancer diagnosis in between 2012 and 2016. Of these women: 

 

1.9% were  20–34 years old

8.4% were 35–44 years old

20.1% were 44–55 years old

25.6% were 55–64 years old

24.8% were 65–74 years old

13.7% were 75–84 years old

5.6% were 84 years and older 

 

Certain lifestyle choices may help prevent breast cancer such as your physical activity level and alcohol consumption. However, many factors can affect a person’s risk of developing breast cancer cannot be controlled, such as family history and age. 

 

Early diagnosis is key to treating breast cancer and keeping it from spreading to surrounding tissue and other parts of the body. If you are a woman age 40 or older, it is important to undergo a mammogram annually. Learn more at ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/

 

Resources 

 

1 Susan G. Komen. Breast cancer in women. 13 May 2019. 

 

2 National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). April 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

sugary drinks

Sugary Drinks May Increase Risk of Cancer

Linking sugary drinks to health problems is not new. The list of conditions sugary drinks may contribute to includes type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.

 

Previous studies have observed that the added sugar in soft drinks may fuel tumor growth and spread cancer in rodents. New research explores this relationship between sugar and cancer.

 

Details of the study

 

The research team observed various forms of cancer in 101,257 French adults. The average age of the patients was 42.

 

The types of drinks consumed included milk-based sugary drinks, syrups, soft drinks,  100% fruit juices and fruit drinks,   sports drinks, and energy drinks.

 

The research also included artificially-sweetened drinks such as sugar-free syrups, diet soft drinks, and diet milk-based beverages.

 

The study also included data gathered from food questionnaires, recording around 3,300 different kinds of foods and drinks. The participants were also observed for up to 9 years.

 

Other factors associated with cancer were considered such as sex, age, hereditary risk of cancer, education, smoking, and exercise.

 

An increased risk of breast cancer 

 

Throughout the follow-up period of the study, 2,193 people developed cancer for the first time.  693 of the cases involved breast cancer, 291 cases were prostate cancer and 166 involved colorectal cancer.

 

The study revealed that with a daily increase of 100 milliliters in sugary drink consumption, the risk of cancer rose by 18%, and the risk of breast cancer increased by 22%.

 

Diet drinks did not increase cancer risk. The participants who consumed diet drinks did so in small quantities, so researchers recommended interpreting this information with caution.

 

An analysis of the study

 

The researchers believe that sugary drinks can raise cancer risk because the sugar affects blood sugar, visceral fat, and inflammatory markers. All of these which previously correlated with higher cancer risk.

 

The number of participants is a strength of the study as well as the information that the researchers gathered.

 

However, the findings may not be well-representative of the general population, as the study did not represent the wider population well. There were more women with health-conscious behaviors and higher educational levels than the general population. This could have resulted in an even lower cancer incidence in comparison with national estimates.

 

 

CCMH is proud to offer cancer care right here at home. To learn about the Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, visit their website at www.ccswok.com.

 

Source 

Thebmj. Sugary drink consumption and risk of cancer: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort. 10 July 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Cancer Centers Award Recipients

Cancer Centers Receives Employer Recognition Award

The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma has been selected as the 2019 Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation Small Employer Recognition Award recipient. The award was presented on Friday, April 12, during the Recognition Breakfast for Oncology Certified Nurses at the ONS Annual Conference in Anaheim, California.

The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma put a major emphasis on certification and participation in professional organizations. While newly hired nurses do not have to be certified upon hire, they are required to become certified within the first two years of employment. CCSO is also a major proponent of the Oncology Nursing Society. Reimbursement is given for ONS membership dues, courses taken through ONS, and travel costs to attend the meetings in Oklahoma City. Patients are made aware of certified nurses since we include information on patient education materials, on our website and in patient teaching sessions.

The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma currently has 31 nurses on staff, 25 RNs and 6 LPNs. 16 are ONC and/or CBNC certified. At the time of nomination, 16 out of the 22 RNs (73%) on staff were certified.

Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma

Cancer Centers Receive ONCC Employer Recognition Award

The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma has been selected as the 2019 Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation Small Employer Recognition Award recipient. They were chosen from among the best in the country as a shining example of oncology nursing at it finest. The award will be presented on Friday, April 12, during the Recognition Breakfast for Oncology Certified Nurses at the ONS Annual Conference in Anaheim, California.

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Image

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus that is passed from person to person during sex. Two screening tests can help prevent cervical cancer. The Pap test looks for cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not treated, and the HPV test looks for the virus that can cause these cell changes. HPV vaccines can protect women against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable. The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screening tests regularly starting at age 21.

Key Facts

  • Most women don’t need a Pap test every year! If your test results are normal, you may be able to wait 3 years between tests.
  • HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer. Get kids vaccinated against HPV at age 11-12 to help prevent cervical cancer.
  • Early cervical cancer may not cause symptoms. Advanced cervical cancer may cause abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge.
  • If your test results are not normal, talk to your doctor. Cervical cancer is highly curable when found and treated early.

Prevention Tips

  • The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screened regularly.
  • If you’re 26 years old or younger, get the HPV vaccine.
  • Use condoms during sex.
  • Limit your number of sexual partners.
  • Don’t smoke.

In the Shadows of Pink: Male Breast Cancer

During this month, you may notice pink ribbons floating around and are probably aware that October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Understandably, many of us will think of this as being an awareness month for women, but what about male breast cancer? Of those that develop cancer, less than 1% of cases occur in men,1 but this is still not a small number of diagnoses. This means over 2,000 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and between 400 and 500 are expected to lose their battle to the disease each year.2

Given that men rarely think to look for signs of breast cancer, it is important that during this month of awareness we take the time to inform men of the symptoms, risk factors and next steps if they believe they may have a problem.

 

What are the symptoms of male breast cancer?

 

The signs of breast cancer in men start just as the signs do in women. A man may discover a painless lump or thicker area of breast tissue. Changes to the skin covering the breast may also occur such as redness, scaling, dimpling or puckering.

Less common are changes to the nipple, including redness or scaling, or a nipple that is suddenly turning inward. There may also be discharge from the nipple.

In cancer that has spread, men may also experience breast pain or bone pain. Lymph node swelling may occur near the breast, most commonly in or near the armpit.

 

What risk factors increase the chances of male breast cancer?

 

Breast cancer is more common among older men although it can develop at any age. Receiving previous radiation treatment to the breast or chest area may increase the risk of a man developing breast cancer. Diseases linked to high levels of estrogen in the body, such as cirrhosis (liver disease) or Klinefelter syndrome (a genetic disorder) can also increase the likeliness of breast cancer development.

Most men that develop breast cancer have at least one female relative who has been diagnosed also. Some men learn that they carry the gene mutation BRCA2 after being diagnosed. If multiple cases of cancer have occured in a family, a doctor may be able to recommend family members for genetic counseling to find out if they also carry the gene mutation and assess their risk. BRCA2 is also linked to prostate cancer.

 

What should a man do if he sees signs of breast cancer?

 

Diagnosed early, the chances of being cured are positive, much like that of female breast cancer. Unfortunately, Men are often not coached to look for symptoms to the extent that women are. Many men lose their battle to breast cancer because it was simply too late, so early diagnosis and receiving clinical and genetic tests can be crucial.

Upon first noticing symptoms, men should contact their primary care physician for a physical exam. The physician may also perform a clinical breast exam (CBE). A mammogram, blood tests, ultrasound and MRI may also be ordered. If a problem is suspected, biopsies are then the next step.

When diagnosed with breast cancer, mastectomy, the removal of the breast, is more commonly recommended for men than women. Men naturally have less breast tissue causing mastectomy to sometimes be the only option. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, may be advisable.

 

What are the emotional effects of male breast cancer?

 

Men that develop breast cancer may have an especially hard time coping with their diagnosis. Research on the psychological effects of male breast cancer noted anxiety, emasculation, embarrassment, and depression.3

“There are huge obstacles being a man with a ‘woman’s disease’, and it goes way beyond the normal stress and tribulations that consume all cancer patients,”4 stated Harvey Singer, male breast cancer survivor.

“We want to see things different for men moving forward. Breast cancer doesn’t care about gender. It will affect men and women the same,”4 responded Harvey’s sister, Vicki, who also has survived the disease.

Although not to the extent of support for women, support of male breast cancer patients is growing. A simple web search will result in an encouraging number of resources and organizations dedicated to supporting male patients and stopping this deadly disease in men. As more awareness is achieved for men struggling with breast cancer, perhaps more men will be able to come “out of the shadows of pink” and feel supported through this difficult disease.

 

 

Here at CCMH, we hope to honor those fighting bravely against breast cancer not only  throughout the month of October, but every day. We are proud to house The Leah M. Fitch Cancer Center of Southwest Oklahoma on our campus, offering medical oncology and radiation oncology services and hematology treatment on site. If you have any questions or concerns about cancer cancer, visit https://www.ccmhhealth.com/cancer-care/.

 

Sources

1 National Center for Biotechnology Information. 3 Feb. 2011. A case report of male breast cancer in a very young patient: What is changing?

2 American Cancer Society. 27 April 2018. Key Statistics for Breast Cancer in Men.

3 Kipling, Mike. Raplh, Jane E.M. and Callahan, Keith. National Center for Biotechnology Information. National Center for Biotechnology Information. 11 Feb. 2014. Psychological Impact of Male Breast Disorders: Literature Review and Survey Results.

4 HIS Breast Cancer Awareness. 2016. About HIS Breast Cancer Awareness.  

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

Faster Diagnostic Testing for Breast Cancer

Faster Diagnostic Testing for Breast Cancer

October is breast cancer awareness month and Comanche County Memorial Hospital, is the only hospital to offer the fastest testing for breast cancer in southwest Oklahoma.

In the past when a patient had a mammogram and a lump was found, the tissue taken from the biopsy would be sent out of state for pathologists to examine. That could take up to a week. But if the patient needed additional testing, it could take even longer.

Now CCMH offers this type of testing on site. Patients can have the diagnosis of cancer within 24 – 48 hours.

Dr. Carol Dittmann is the Chief of Pathology at Comanche County Memorial Hospital. She says decreasing the time they inform the patient of a diagnosis of cancer is crucial.

“From the point the patient has an abnormal mammogram to the point of seeing the oncologist and making treatment plans and decisions, we aim for that to be less than a week,” Dr. Dittmann said. “With this new technology in house, we are able to achieve that.”

Dr. Dittmann wants to remind people that breast cancer can happen to both men and women, and that this new technology can help everyone in the community. She says to keep up with your yearly mammograms and to get checked out if you feel a lump in your breasts.

To schedule an appointment to get a mammogram, you can call the McMahon Center for Breast Health at 580-250-5856.

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