Blue graphic with a white DNA strand behind human head with red frontal lobe of brain indicating dementia

Dementia or Alzheimer’s? What’s the difference?

We’ve all heard of the terms Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Unfortunately, they are all too prevalent words in the human vocabulary as we begin to talk about aging and signs of cognitive deterioration, but the distinction between the two can sometimes be a difficult subject to understand. They are most common in aging Individuals 65 or older. People with Dementia experience a decrease in cognitive functions such as reasoning, memory and critical thinking.
Alzheimers is a degenerative brain disease in which cells in the brain break down and can impact memory and behavior. While these sound similar, there is a difference between Dementia and Alzehimer’s.

What is Dementia?

People with Dementia experience a progressive decrease in cognitive functions such as reasoning, memory and critical thinking. Dementia describes a group of symptoms associated with a decline in memory, reasoning or other thinking skills. Many different types of dementia exist and many conditions cause it, meaning that Dementia is not a normal part of aging. Dementia is a result of damage to brain cells that affects peoples’ ability to communicate, which can affect thinking, behavior and feelings.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “Alzheimer’s is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by complex brain changes following cell damage.” In addition, Alzheimer’s is actually a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms eventually grow severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease experience a great deal of difficulty due to confusion and inability to complete thoughts. Alzheimer’s impacts the ability to draw memories together in a complete sequence.

Early onset Alzheimer’s and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Alzehimer’s is most commonly seen in adults aged 65 years or older, however, it can also impact younger individuals. These individuals may experience Mild Cognitive Impairment early on in life that leads to a full diagnosis of Alzheimer’s later in life. Because it is so common for older men and women to be diagnosed with Alzehimer’s, a younger person with early onset is more likely to be misdiagnosed, therefore leading to a mistreatment and lack of support for the condition. Because of this. it’s important to be aware of the symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment and monitor its
progression.

If you are concerned about you or a loved one experiencing any signs of cognitive impairment at any age, visit your trusted CCMH Provider. For more  information about CCMH Silver Lining Geriatric Psychiatric Care, call us today.

Disclaimer:

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical
advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any
services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any
links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website
does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the
medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information
may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions
or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Sources:
Identify Alzheimer’s Disease Earlier: https://www.identifyalz.com/
Alzheimer’s Association: https://www.alz.org/alzheimer_s_dementia
Alzheimer’s Association: https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers
The Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-
depth/alzheimers/art-20048356

3D COVID-19 virus with "Community COVID Antibody Testing" text

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Wednesday, September 23rd
6am–4pm

Thursday, September 24th
8am–5pm

Comanche County Memorial Hospital
Outpatient Center Resource Room
110 NW 31st Street • Lawton, OK

Call 580-585-5406 to RSVP

$30, no fasting blood draw
NO CREDIT CARDS
CASH OR CHECK ONLY

Free for CCMH Employees

dark haired suicidal woman receiving hug from while male with beard

National Suicide Prevention Week

During the week of September 6th-12th, Americans recognize Suicide Prevention month with hopes to spread awareness of the prevalence of Suicide in your community. This week is dedicated to sharing ideas of how to care for those who are struggling with suicidal thoughts and provide outlets and resources for help.

Every 40 seconds, one person commits suicide in the United States. That equates to 800,000 people a year who take their own lives. In the state of Oklahoma alone, suicide is the 9th leading cause of death for all people; it is the 2nd leading cause for people ages 10-34. For every suicide, there are approximately 25 attempts. With numbers this staggering, it is important family members, coworkers, and friends are aware of the warning signs for suicidal thoughts in the people we are surrounded by. The following list of risk factors raise our awareness of who may be of higher risk. 

Risk Factors

Every suicide is different and is typically a result of different risk factors. These risk factors may include:

  • History of a mental health problems, especially clinical depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Family history of suicide
  • Family history of child maltreatment or abuse
  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • History of alcohol and substance abuse
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Impulsive or aggressive tendencies
  • Cultural and religious beliefs (e.g., belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma)
  • Local epidemics of suicide or graphic, sensationalized accounts of suicide
  • Isolation, a feeling of being cut off from other people
  • Barriers to accessing mental health treatment
  • Relationship or intimate partner conflict
  • Stressful life events (death, divorce, job loss, legal trouble)
  • Prolonged stress (harassment, bullying, chronic pain, homelessness)
  • Easy access to lethal methods, including firearms and drugs
  • Unwillingness to seek help because of the stigma attached to mental health and substance abuse disorders or to suicidal thoughts

Protective Factors

It can be difficult to notice when someone may be close to taking their own life. If you suspect someone is contemplating suicide, you can help locate or provide these Protective Factors to provide support and potentially prevent a suicide attempt:

  • Support of family, friends and others (counselors, managers, etc.)
  • The presence of an intimate, supportive partner
  • Church attendance and participation in religious activities
  • Religious coping (prayer, worship, meditation, Scripture, meeting with spiritual leaders, etc.)
  • Moral and spiritual objections to suicide
  • Moral and spiritual sense of responsibility to family, God, etc.
  • Beliefs that aid survival or coping with trials such as “I am loved,” “I am not alone,” and “I can overcome.”
  • Problem solving skills and ability to regulate one’s own emotional response
  • Personal strengths such as persistence, resilience, hope, etc…
  • Family cohesion

Prevention

Ultimately, suicide can be a difficult topic to discuss with anyone. If you or a loved one are struggling with coping with external factors that induce suicidal thoughts, remember help and support are here for you. Ways to help prevent suicide include:

  • Strengthen economic supports such as housing stabilization and household financial security.
  • Strengthen access and delivery of care including mental health care and insurance
  • Create protective environments with reduced access to lethal means and excessive alcohol.
  • Promote connectedness with peer norm programs and community engagement
  • Teach coping and problem-solving skills.
  • Identify and support those at risk with possible crisis intervention and re-attempt prevention courses.

Whether you or someone you know is at risk for suicide, know that there is help and support available. You are cared for and not alone. If you do wish to speak to someone about your current mental health needs, your CCMH Providers are here to help as we all navigate these challenging times. 


Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/suicide/fastfact.html

Helping Prevent Suicide: A Three-Part Series from Chaplain Paul Gore (PDF)

3D COVID-19 virus with "Community COVID Antibody Testing" text

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Community COVID Antibody Testing

Wednesday, September 23rd
6am–4pm

Thursday, September 24th
8am–5pm

Comanche County Memorial Hospital
Outpatient Center Resource Room
110 NW 31st Street • Lawton, OK

Call 580-585-5406 to RSVP

$30, no fasting blood draw
NO CREDIT CARDS
CASH OR CHECK ONLY

Free for CCMH Employees

illustration showing person wearing mask incorrectly (not covering nose or mouth) and correctly (covering both nose and mouth) with the words "face masks required to enter"

CCMH Coronavirus Update

Friendly reminders: Masks must be worn at all times while in the facility. They must be put on at the point of entry into the hospital and may be removed once you have exited the building. In addition to this being a CCMH policy, it is also now a city mandate. Patients and visitors must wear masks while staff members are present in the room. N95 masks must be worn by all staff present while aerosolizing procedures are being performed (CPR, insertion of an airway, etc).

Please use hand sanitizer upon entry into the cafeteria, before using the soda machine, and before getting coffee. This helps keep dietary workers, other patrons, and yourself safe!

Travel, international or domestic, is strongly discouraged at this time.

Infection Prevention holds virtual town halls every other Thursday at 11 AM (new time!). If you need an invitation with dial-in information, please email Chris Godman.

COVID-related questions can be sent to CCMHcovid19hotline@ccmhhealth.com

We would like to thank Occupational Health for the hard work, flexibility, and readiness that they have displayed since the beginning of the pandemic. Though they are a small department, they have organized and implemented several mass screening clinics for our employees during this time. Thank you, Occupational Health!

illustration showing person wearing mask incorrectly (not covering nose or mouth) and correctly (covering both nose and mouth) with the words "face masks required to enter"

Coronavirus Update

COVID cases in Oklahoma are remaining at a higher level of activity than previously seen. CCMH Incident Command continues to watch the community and statewide situation closely, as well as making adjustments to policies and procedures to maximize safety for staff. Some recent policy and procedure changes made include:

  • Patients must be provided a mask if they do not have one, and must wear the mask while a healthcare provider or staff member is in the room, or when the patient leaves their room (this includes in the hallway to ambulate, when being escorted out for discharge, and when being transferred to other departments or units).
  • Healthcare providers involved in direct patient care must wear eye protection for all patient encounters (eye glasses are not sufficient to meet this requirement).
  • Healthcare providers involved in direct patient care may not wear a cloth mask, per CDC recommendations; if a cloth mask is worn, it may only be worn over a provided procedure mask, and must be laundered daily.
  • All participants in CPR and intubation of a patient must wear a N95 mask during the procedure.

As always, our primary focus is keeping our staff, visitors, and patients as safe as possible. If you have a concern or question, please submit it to ccmhcovid19hotline@ccmhhealth.com.

In local COVID news, the City of Lawton passed an ordinance last week requiring face masks/coverings to be worn inside any establishment. The ordinance is tailored after similar ordinances in various municipalities throughout Oklahoma and created to be consistent with CDC recommended guidelines. The ordinance states every person in the City of Lawton shall wear a face covering over the nose and mouth when inside a commercial entity or other building, structure or space open to the public, public transit, or when in an outdoor public space where social distancing cannot be maintained. Exceptions include circumstances involving age, private settings, activity, medical conditions, potentially hazardous situations, or certain types of businesses and clientele. Educational institutions with adopted plans are also exempt.

woman in mask

Why the Bubonic Plague Is Not a Great Concern

China reported a case of the bubonic plague in a herdsman living in the northern city of Bayannur earlier this month. This morning, ABC News reported a squirrel testing positive for the disease in Colorado.

Hearing of recent cases of the bubonic plague naturally might make you feel uneasy as we continue to fight the COVID-19 Pandemic. After all, the disease did trigger the “Black Death” Pandemic in the mid-1300s. Black Death killed around 50 million in Europe alone. The pandemic continued for centuries, making it one of the deadliest diseases in history.

 

What is plague?

Plague is an infectious disease.  In 1894, Alexandre Yersin discovered Yersinia pestis, the bacterium responsible for plague, under a microscope. The most common carriers of Yersinia pestis are small mammals and their fleas. Fleas transmit the disease to mammals including humans. Therefore, transmission can take place from direct contact with a flea, or from an animal infected by the flea. There are three forms of plague: bubonic, pneumonic, and septicemic.

 

How does plague spread?

Many mammals are hosts of Yersinia pestis. These mammals include mice, rats, prairie dogs, rabbits, chipmunks, and squirrels. Rats are often associated with the plague. They were once a common catalyst for plague spread due to their close proximity to humans in crowded, unsanitary urban areas.

Recently, scientists discovered that Xenopsylla cheopis, a flea that lives on rats, is in fact the main cause of human cases of plague. After a rodent dies from plague, fleas jump to a new host, infecting the new host. Transmission also occurs through handling tissue or blood from a plague-infected animal, or inhalation of infected droplets.

 

What are the symptoms of plague?

Initial symptoms of the early stages of bubonic plague include vomiting, nausea, and fever. Bubonic plague’s name derives from buboes—swollen, painful lymph nodes which are also a symptom of plague. They occur around the armpit, neck, or groin.  These skin sores turn black, giving it its nickname “Black Death.”

Pneumonic plague is the most infectious type. This advanced stage of plague moves into the lungs. Pneumonic plague passes directly from person to person via airborne particles coughed from an infected person’s lungs.

Untreated, bubonic and pneumonic plague may progress to septicemic plague. Septicemic plague infects the bloodstream. Nearly all humans infected with pneumonic and septicemic plague die.

 

The beginning of plague in the United States

The first known cases of plague in the  United States occurred in 1900. Cases arrived in the U.S.  by rat-infested steamships, mainly those arriving from Asia. Epidemics in port cities were not uncommon.  In 1924-1925, the last U.S. urban plague epidemic occurred in Los Angeles. Plague then spread from urban rats to rural rodents, causing the disease to occur in more rural areas of the Western U.S.

 

Is plague common today?

Plague spread today is mostly sporadic. It pops up in countries all around the world each year including the United States. The World Health Organization reports 1,000 to 3,000 new cases of the disease every year. Plague is present on all continents with the exception of Oceania. Most human cases, however, have occurred in Africa since the 1990s. The top three countries that experience plague are Peru, Madagascar, and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) with DRC having the highest number of cases.

Scientists link the prevalence of plague in DRC to the mountainous terrain and tropical climate.  The most recent outbreak of plague happened in Madagascar in 2017 with more than 2,300 cases.

The United States, China, India, Vietnam, and Mongolia are common countries that report human plague cases. In the U.S., seven human cases of plague appear each year on average, emerging primarily in California and the southwestern states.

 

Is plague still deadly?

It is virtually impossible that the plague could become a pandemic due to modern medicine. Untreated, the plague still progresses to a deadly stage, but today, most people survive with rapid diagnosis and antibiotic treatment.  Antibiotics work best if given within 24 hours of symptoms. In severe cases, patients can receive oxygen, intravenous fluids, and breathing support. Those who have come into contact with an animal or person who has the plague may also take preventative antibiotics.

 

How do we prevent the spread of plague?

To prevent plague outbreaks, practice good sanitation, hygiene and pest control, and; minimize contact with wild animals that may carry infected fleas.

 

Sources 

1 Yes the Bubonic Plague Is Still Around, Why You Don’t Need to Worry. Healthline. Ries, Julia. 7 July 2020.

2 Plague was one of history’s deadliest diseases—then we found a cure. National Geographic. Howard, Jenny.

3 PlagueWorld Health Organization.

4 Maps and Statistics, Plagues in the United States. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 

5 Squirrel tests positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. ABC News. Haworth, Jon. 14 July 2020.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

PTSD patients

Do You Think You Have PTSD?

When thinking of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), many think of soldiers. As a proud military community, we cannot deny the fact that PTSD is a troubling problem for those in the military, especially those who have faced the difficulties of combat. In fact, depending on where they served, 11-20% of all veterans experience PTSD. However, statistics also clearly show that PTSD is not just a problem that affects our military.

 

What is PTSD?

After a traumatic experience, sometimes the feeling of sadness, anxiety, and fear do not improve over time. If this is the case, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD may develop following any traumatic event.

PTSD affects people who personally experience the traumatic event, witnesses to the event, and those who assist afterward such as emergency workers and law enforcement officers. No matter the cause, with treatment and support, it is possible to manage your symptoms, reduce the pain of memories, and move beyond the trauma.

 

Statistics about PTSD 

Of the 70% of adults in the United States who have experienced a traumatic event, 20% develop PTSD.

5% of Americans have PTSD at any given time.

1 of 13 people in the U.S. develop PTSD during their lifetime.

1 out of 9 get PTSD at some time in their lives and women are about twice as likely as men to experience PTSD. *

*Statistics gathered from Sidran Institute 

 

How PTSD Occurs 

PTSD is different from person to person because everyone’s nervous system and tolerance for stress is different. While PTSD is likely during the hours or days following a traumatic event, it can sometimes take years before symptoms appear. Sometimes symptoms even appear out of the blue. Other times, they are triggered by a painful reminder of the traumatic event. Examples include an image, certain words, noise, or smell.

 

Symptoms of PTSD

There are four main symptoms of PTSD:

  1. Re-experiencing the traumatic event through flashbacks, nightmares, or memories. This includes intense mental or physical reactions when remembering the trauma.
  2. Avoiding reminders of the trauma. This includes losing interest in activities one was taking part in when the incident occurred and feeling emotionally detached from others.
  3. Hyperarousal is also a common symptom. This includes sleep problems, irritability, hypervigilance, feeling jumpy, and having angry outbursts.
  4. Negative thoughts and difficulty concentrating or remembering. This includes hopelessness, feeling distrust, betrayal, guilt, shame, self-blame.

 

PTSD symptoms in children

For children, especially younger children, the symptoms may include:

  • Fear of separation from their parent
  • Lose of previously-acquired skills such as toilet training
  • Nightmares and difficulty sleeping
  • Play in which aspects of the trauma are repeated
  • New anxieties and phobias such as fear of monsters
  • Re-creating the trauma through stories, drawings or play
  • Aches and pains without an apparent cause
  • Aggression and irritability

PTSD may also result from surgery when children are too young to fully understand what’s happening to them.

 

If you are struggling to recover from trauma, please reach out to one of our providers today. You can find a list of them at cmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

summer sunglasses

Summer Habits to Establish and Continue All Year

We have had some incredible weather so far this spring! The official first day of summer will be here before you know it! As you are participating in all the outdoor activities of summer, there are many things to remember to help keep you healthier and enjoying during these warmer months. 

 

Here are our 7 summer health tips to implement this summer and the rest of the year as well. Some of us are better at remembering to do these tasks during the summer, but truly these are great tips to remember year-round!

 

Protect your skin

 

The sun’s rays are strongest during the summer months. Your skin is your largest organ and the first line of defense against the elements, so treat it well! However, summer is not the only time to remember sunscreen!  Your skin is still exposed every day. You probably don’t need to apply sunscreen as frequently as a summer day at the beach, but it is still a good idea to remember a little sunscreen daily, no matter the season or weather. 

 

Stay hydrated 

 

 With heat exhaustion and heatstroke serious summer threats, we tend to be more mindful of thirst in the summer. It’s important to stay hydrated, not just when you feel parched in the heat. Once summer passes, you may not feel as parched. Staying hydrated is still crucial to keeping your body at its best, however.

If you struggle with drinking enough water, buy a big jug you can fill up and keep near you all day. You need to drink approximately half of your weight in ounces of water every day.

 

Protect your eyes

 

Sunglasses are more than shade for your eyes and a fashion statement. Without them, you’re at the mercy of harmful UV rays and “blue light.”  This exposure puts you at risk for macular degeneration, cataracts, and eyelid cancer. Furthermore, sunglasses aid with more comfortable and improved vision from not having to squint. Sunglasses just might keep more than just your eyes safe as well. Good vision is especially important when you’re participating in outdoor sports. 

 

Get moving more 

 

Sunny summer days and evenings beckon us outdoors to soak up the sun, but don’t let dreary days in the fall, winter, or spring keep you from getting some exercise. If you have an office job on top of that, it can seem difficult to get moving. Get a fitness tracker to help you make sure you’re getting your steps in around the office or consider getting a standing desk to get you on your feet to keep exercise in focus year-round. 

 

 

Don’t leave swimming to the kids 

 

Swimming is excellent exercise for the entire family. As a low-impact exercise, anyone can do it. Just thirty minutes of light to moderate lap swimming may burn over 230 calories! Unless you are fortunate enough to live in a very temperate climate though, swimming is not enjoyable for much of the year. However, you may have a good indoor swimming pool available. Many gyms do, such as our local Family YMCA

 

Protect yourself from mosquitoes 

 

West Nile and Zika viruses are mosquito bite spread conditions and are no joke! Insect repellants can help. Also, cover exposed skin whenever possible and avoid going outside during dawn and dusk hours when mosquitoes are active. Remember not to scratch when you do get a bite! It will only make the itch worse! 

 

Eat seasonal foods

 

When you think of eating fresh, seasonal veggies and fruits, you probably think of summertime. In summer months, we tend to eat more fruits and veggies because they’re fresh. This can help us stay away from unhealthy snacks. Strawberries and tomatoes may not always be in season, but don’t forget fall superfoods around the corner. Brussels sprouts, pumpkins, and apples can be just as delicious and are also excellently healthy! 

 

If you are in need of a checkup or to find a new provider, summer is a great time to plan to do so when winter cold germs and the flu are lingering. Check out our list of providers at ccmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

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