young women ovarian cancer risk

This Common Symptom of Ovarian Cancer is Often Overlooked

A lack of awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms may have serious consequences for some women.

 

What is ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a type of female reproductive cancer that begins in the ovaries. Women typically have two ovaries, one on each side of the uterus. The ovaries are about the size of an almond. They produce eggs and important hormones- estrogen and progesterone.

 

Statistics about ovarian cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, each year in the U.S., over 21,000 women receive their diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Nearly 14,000 also die from the disease annually. The risk of developing the disease increases with age and is about 1 in 78. Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women, accounting for the most deaths over any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

 

Why is ovarian cancer often overlooked?

According to the Mayo Clinic, one of the major concerns regarding ovarian cancer is that it often goes undetected until it reaches the belly and pelvis. At later stages, ovarian cancer is more difficult to treat and more likely fatal.

Ovarian cancer is also often asymptomatic in the early stages. Later stages have noticeable symptoms, but they can be non-specific, such as loss of appetite and weight loss.

 

Which symptom of ovarian cancer do women overlook?

A study led by researchers in the U.K. of a non-profit organization, Target Research, discovered that many women are likely to miss a common ovarian cancer symptom and change their diet other than visit their doctor. Common symptoms of ovarian cancer include always feeling full, persistent bloating, stomach pain, and needing to urinate more.

The organization surveyed more than 1,100 women. How did women respond to hypothetically experiencing bloating?

  • 34% said they would visit their doctor if regularly experiencing bloating.
  • 50% said they would consider dietary changes. These changes include removing dairy or gluten or adding probiotic yogurt.
  • 43% said they would Google their symptoms.
  • 23%  said they would purchase over-the-counter medications.
  • 22% said they would exercise more.

A previous survey by Target Research found that only 20% of women identified bloating as a symptom of ovarian cancer.

 

Other common symptoms of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer was once thought of as a “silent killer.” That changed in the 1990s however when research revealed catching early symptoms and beginning treatment can greatly improve a patient’s outcome. Besides the mentioned symptoms, other potential symptoms include nausea, fatigue,  menstrual changes, pain during sex, back pain, and constipation.

 

If you experience any of the symptoms above, do not delay in reaching out to your CCMH Provider.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While we frequently update content, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

baby bottle with breast milk on a table with a vase of flowers in foreground, mother breastfeeding baby in background

CCMH Celebrates World Breast Feeding Week August 1–7, 2020

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is promoting World Breast feeding Week, Aug.1- 7, with the theme “Empower Parents, Enable Breast feeding.” The theme focuses on supporting both parents to be empowered in order to facilitate reaching breast feeding goals.

Empowerment is a process which requires evidence-based, unbiased information and support to create the enabling environment where mothers can breast feed optimally. Breast feeding is in the mother’s domain and when fathers, partners, families, workplaces, and communities support her, breast feeding improves.

CCMH is a designated BabyFriendly Hospital by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). The initiative encourages and recognizes hospitals that offer an optimal level of care for breast feeding mothers and their babies. If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment you can call CCMH’s infant feeding resource center at 580.250.5253 and speak with one of our board certified lactation consultants.

breastfeeding mom

Help the Environment by Breastfeeding Your Baby

August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week!  Over 120 countries recognize this impactful week for moms and babies.

It is widely recommended by physicians and health care authorities that mothers exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first six months of life and continue to breastfeed while introducing solids during the second half of the first year of life.

Breastfeeding has incredible health benefits for both moms and babies. However, an often-overlooked benefit is breastfeeding’s positive impact on the environment. There’s no better time than now to discuss it though. The theme of World Breastfeeding Week for 2020 is “Support breastfeeding for a healthier planet!”

 

How does breastfeeding impact the environment? 

Breastmilk is the most nutritionally balanced food for your baby. Breastmilk contains no preservatives, processing, or risk of contaminants.

In a way, breast milk is a renewable resource and saves energy! When feeding directly from the breast, there is no need to warm milk. You supply the perfect ingredients for your baby at just the right temperature!

Breastfeeding also reduces waste. It only requires the mom and baby’s body to make it happen! Bottles and formulas require a lot of packaging to produce, promote, and recycle. Therefore, breastfeeding is most efficient to reduce waste and save energy.

 

How does pumping breast milk affect the environment? 

Some moms prefer to pump instead of feed directly on the breast. This may be so others can feed baby while mom is away or due to issues with baby’s latch on the breast. A breast pump requires additional gear and storage products. However, it’s still more friendly to mother earth than formula feeding. Many products needed to pump are also reusable.

Upon the completion of a breastfeeding journey, some manufacturers also have a recycling program for their breast pumps.

 

If you are a mom who was able to breastfeed and did, we thank you! You have played a part to positively impact our planet and create a healthier society.

 

Learn about CCMH’s breastfeeding support provided to moms and babies through our “baby-friendly” designation.

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

baby with trisomy

Facts about Trisomy

March is Trisomy Awareness Month. Many awareness months commemorate diseases the public is actually quite familiar with. Trisomy however, is a much less discussed medical concern. To commemorate this year’s theme of Trisomy Awareness Month,  “We are their Voice, They are our Heart,” we wanted to take a moment to share with you some basic facts you may not know about trisomy. 

 

What is trisomy? 

 

The majority of people have 23 pairs of chromosomes in most (if not all) of their cells. That is a total of 46 chromosomes. These chromosomes include unique DNA and other genetic material necessary to make up each individual. Some individuals have trisomy conditions. This means they have an extra chromosome in most or all of their cells, for a total of 47 chromosomes. 

 

What type of problems arise from trisomy? 

 

An extra chromosome can cause a variety of concerns ranging from mild intellectual and developmental disability, to severe physical problems. Rarely do trisomy conditions pass from one generation to the next. They are more likely  the result of a random error that occurs during cell division very early during development.

 

Trisomy can occur within any chromosome. The most well-known syndromes resulting are Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome), Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) and Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome).

 

What are signs of trisomy during pregnancy?

 

Sometimes trisomies are diagnosed during pregnancy. These signs may include:

 

only one umbilical cord artery

too much amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios)

a smaller than expected placenta

an unusually inactive baby 

the baby measuring small

congenital defects such as cleft palate or heart irregularities picked up during ultrasound scans

 

How are trisomies diagnosed? 

 

During pregnancy the following tests may help your doctor discover a trisomy:

 

non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) 

maternal serum screening

ultrasound scans 

chorionic villus sampling

amniocentesis

 

Although the news of your child having a trisomy may be difficult to accept, in many cases he or she can still live a fulfilling life. If you are in this position, talk to your CCMH Provider. He or she may recommend resources to help prepare you for this journey. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

morning person drinking cofee

Sleep Habits Affect Breast Cancer?

Sleep is important for the immune system to work and prevent or overcome illness, but how important? Important enough to prevent cancer?  A recent study published in The BMJ suggests this may be so. In fact, women who are morning people may have a lower chance of developing breast cancer. 

 

The study analyzed 180,216 women from the UK Biobank and 228,951 women from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The researchers reported that morning persons seem to have a protection from breast cancer. Furthermore, sleeping more than 7-8 hours per night could even have an “adverse effect” on the risk of breast cancer. 1

 

The facts of the study

 

Although lifestyle factors which may have a positive effect on breast cancer prevention,  the effects of sleep are small, compared with other risk factors for breast cancer, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and BMI. In fact, the research showed that women with a morning preference had a less than 1% lower risk of developing breast cancer when compared with women with an evening preference. 

 

A factor that has a less than 1% effect on women’s breast cancer risk seems so minimal. This means less than 10 women out of 1,000 may develop breast cancer due to their sleep preference. Yet when it comes to preventing a major killer of women, we can’t help but wonder the significance this factor may play. 

 

Also, the researchers noted that attempting to modify sleep habits does not seem to eventually lead to a decrease in the risk of breast cancer. For example, there is no association between sleep issues as insomnia and breast cancer risk. 

 

Following sleep schedule likely benefits metabolic health

 

Even though the link between sleep and breast cancer in this particular study were minimal, the results are probably not surprising to most health professionals. Prior research has demonstrated that those with a regular pattern of waking up and going to bed are less likely to be obese, have high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. A future exploration of the stresses on our biological clock is needed.

 

For women age forty and older, the first line of defense against breast cancer is annual mammograms. To learn more, visit ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/.

 

Source

 

1 Rebecca C Richmond,  Emma L Anderson, Hassan S Dashti, et al. The BMJ. Investigating causal relations between sleep traits and risk of breast cancer in women: mendelian randomisation study. 26 Jun. 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

Content is frequently updated, however, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

mom and daughter on bench

Your Breast Cancer Risk as You Age

The American Cancer Society has named  breast cancer as the most common type of cancer among American women other than non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States battle breast cancer at some point during their lifetime. 

 

Typically, we think of diseases such as breast cancer a problem experienced among older women.  It is true that as you age, your chance of developing breast cancer also increases. However, women may develop breast cancer at any age. 

 

In this article, we will examine the impact age has on breast cancer. 

 

At what age do most women receive their breast cancer diagnosis? 

 

Women over the age of 50 are more likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis. In fact, the median age for this diagnosis is 62 years 1 old with most doctors giving a breast cancer diagnosis to women between the age of 55 and 64.  As we age, abnormal changes in cells are more likely to occur.

 

What is the risk for each age group? 

 

The SEER Cancer Statistics Review annually assess the risk of a woman developing breast cancer during her lifetime. According to the SEER, the risk that an American  female develops breast cancer within the next 10 years is:

 

0.44% at age 30

1.47% at age 40

2.38% at age 50

3.56% at age 60

3.82% at age 70 2

 

What age were women who received a breast cancer diagnosis in recent years? 

 

The SEER report showed 437,722 women received their breast cancer diagnosis in between 2012 and 2016. Of these women: 

 

1.9% were  20–34 years old

8.4% were 35–44 years old

20.1% were 44–55 years old

25.6% were 55–64 years old

24.8% were 65–74 years old

13.7% were 75–84 years old

5.6% were 84 years and older 

 

Certain lifestyle choices may help prevent breast cancer such as your physical activity level and alcohol consumption. However, many factors can affect a person’s risk of developing breast cancer cannot be controlled, such as family history and age. 

 

Early diagnosis is key to treating breast cancer and keeping it from spreading to surrounding tissue and other parts of the body. If you are a woman age 40 or older, it is important to undergo a mammogram annually. Learn more at ccmhhealth.com/womens-health/womens-imaging/mammogram/

 

Resources 

 

1 Susan G. Komen. Breast cancer in women. 13 May 2019. 

 

2 National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). April 2019. 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

cooking with onion and garlic

Garlic and Onion Consumption May Prevent Breast Cancer

A recent study held in Puerto Rico took a look at onion and garlic consumption and the effect these vegetables have on breast cancer. The results may be very positive for some women.

 

About the study 

 

Onions and garlic are part of the same plant family as chives, leeks and other species. Not only are they well-loved by many due to their rich flavor, but these vegetables may have disease-fighting characteristics.  Some evidence also links them to curing diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes.

 

In regards to cancer, multiple studies have examined diet and breast cancer risk. In summary, these studies discovered that the more of these vegetables individuals consumed, the lower their risk of developing various cancers became.

 

A team of researchers decided to look at the diets of women in Puerto Rico and compare their breast cancer risk. The team chose Puerto Rico for two reasons. Puerto Rico has lower breast cancer rates in comparison with the mainland U.S. A largely consumed condiment of Puerto Rico, “sofrito,” is also made mainly of onion and garlic.

 

The researchers published the results of the study in the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

 

How the researchers gathered data

 

Using clinical and hospital records, the team discovered 314 women who were breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2014. The women were between the ages of 30 and 79.  The study also included 346 control participants.

 

To join the control group, participants could not have had cancer with the exception of nonmelanoma skin cancer.  A  food frequency questionnaire told the researchers about dietary habits including onion and garlic consumption, and specifically the sofrito consumption of each participant.

 

The team adjusted their findings for factors such as body mass index, education, age, history, and smoking status to name a few.

 

Astounding findings 

 

The research team discovered that Sofrito consumers who ate it twice or more daily had a 67% lower breast cancer risk. The research team suspects that the flavonols and organosulfur compounds in onions and garlic may help prevent cancer. Specifically, the diallyl disulfide, S-allylcysteine, and diallyl sulfide in garlic and the alk(en)yl cysteine sulphoxides in onions have shown anticarcinogenic properties in studies involving humans and animals.

 

Although encouraging, the study did have the limitations of a small group of participants. The group of non-onion and garlic consumers was too small for comparison. Also, no standard Sofrito recipe exists. Sofrito is often homemade and includes additional ingredients such as tomatoes, bell peppers, black pepper, and cilantro.

 

Regardless, these results are encouraging to onion and garlic consumers hoping to eat a diet that may help prevent breast cancer.

 

Interested in learning about cancer care available right here in Lawton? Check out The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma!

 

Resource

 

1 Taylor & Francis Online. Gauri Desai, Michelle Schelske-Santos, Cruz M. Nazario, et al. Onion and Garlic Intake and Breast Cancer, a Case-Control Study in Puerto Rico.  12 August 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital also does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

mother holding baby

Flying With Breast Milk

August 1-7  is World Breastfeeding Week! A common concern many moms have is flying with breast milk either due to exclusively pumping or not having their child with them. Flying with breast milk for the first time can be nerve wracking. How much can you bring? What can you do to ensure your milk is allowed to pass security checkpoints? Before you travel this summer, take a look at this list of things to things to know about flying with breast milk to ensure you are able to fly without any added stress.

 

Know what you are allowed to carry

 

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) states that you may pass the security checkpoint with formula, breast milk and juice for infants or toddlers ”in reasonable quantities.” You do not have to ensure that your milk fits into quart sized bags or meets the 3 oz rule that applies to other liquids.  Remove these items from your carry-on bag so the agent may screen them separately from the rest of your belongings. 

 

A breast pump is a medical device and therefore does not count as your carryon luggage.  The cooler you bring to store your milk in however, does count if carried separately from your other carryon luggage. Many times little attention is given to how many bags a passenger is actually bringing onto the plane, but be prepared to explain why you have an extra carryon item when carrying a pump if needed. 

 

You may also bring gel or liquid-filled teethers and canned and processed baby food in carry-on luggage. Additional screening may occur with these items.  

 

How TSA screens breast milk 

 

When going through security, always declare your breast milk. Kindly ask the TSA agent to change into clean gloves before he inspects your milk. TSA typically screens breast milk by x-ray. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports that there are no known adverse effects from consuming items screened by x-ray. 1

 

If your milk is frozen solid, the TSA agents will not perform special tests. If thawed, the TSA officers may ask you to open the container and even transfer a small quantity of the liquid to a separate empty container for visual inspection. Kindly request that the TSA agent put on clean gloves before touching your cooler. If the agent conducts a test, he or she wipes the bottle with a piece of paper and puts the paper in a machine that tests for explosives.

 

How to store your milk 

 

To store your milk, you need a water-tight cooler with plenty of ice packs. If you can do without bottles, breast milk storage bags will pack easier and lighter than bottles. After security, consider sealing your cooler with duct tape to keep it cool and prevent leaking. 

 

If booking lodging, try to find a hotel that has rooms with a refrigerator/ freezer. If you do not have a freezer in your room, or it doesn’t cool enough to freeze your milk, ask to keep your breast milk cooler in the hotel freezer. 

 

Pumping while traveling 

 

Many airports offer a breastfeeding lounge or baby care area. If one is not available, search for a family restroom with an outlet.

 

For your convenience, it is possible to mail/ship breast milk. This can be helpful if you are gone for an extended period and need to send milk home for your baby. However, shipping breast milk is costly. There are services that ship breast milk exclusively or you can ship via services such as FedEx. In order to do this, you must purchase dry ice, a styrofoam cooler, and a box for shipping. 

 

Dry ice is cold enough that it can make plastic breast milk storage bags or bottles brittle and break. To prevent this, seal your breast milk bottles in zip-lock bags and pad them with crumpled up newspaper inside your cooler.

 

The US Postal Service does not permit dry ice in the mail. You can however ship milk with regular ice packs overnight. This is much cheaper but of course has the added risk of milk thawing en route.

 

For international travel, contact the consulate of your destination country to determine their individual shipping regulations.

 

 

 

Comanche County Memorial Hospital is proud to be recognized as a Baby Friendly Hospital by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

 

Do you have questions about breastfeeding? For travel questions, always check the latest TSA guidelines. For general questions, our Infant Feeding Resource Center would love to meet with you and discuss any breastfeeding concerns you may have. 

 

Resource

1 U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Frequently Asked Questions on Cabinet X-ray Systems. 9 March. 2018.

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

couple sitting near lake

Battling Infertility

April 21-27 commemorates National Infertility Week. Infertility can be a difficult journey that leaves many individuals feeling hopeless and alone. Many describe it as seeming like everyone else around them is happily enjoying life while their lives are frozen in a place they never wanted to visit.

 

While discussing this topic, we had an opportunity to visit with couples in our area who have had their own struggles with infertility. We appreciate them taking the time to share their own thoughts with us on this subject.

 

Who experiences infertility?

 

Infertility is often viewed as a female problem and a problem that mainly affects older women trying to conceive. However, infertility is not biased, and it can affect men and women of various ages. Approximately one-third of infertility issues are from a female partner.  One- third of issues are from a male partner, and one-third of issues are caused by both partners or the cause is unknown. 1

 

Men need support in infertility too. Paul and his wife struggled to conceive and also experienced a miscarriage. He said, “It was very sad and disappointing. I felt like there was nothing I could do to make that time any easier for my wife.”

 

Infertility is an emotional rollercoaster

 

Some days someone may feel positive during their infertility battle, other days they won’t. Beware of this and know some days are just bad days. There isn’t anything you can do sometimes but offer a hug and lend an ear, but your friend will still appreciate the sentiment.

 

Samantha suffered a miscarriage and then waited for years to be able to conceive again. When asked for ways to cope with all the emotions, Samantha responded, “Infertility is painful. It’s such a close, personal heartache. A piece of your heart is missing that you didn’t know existed. Find someone that has experienced it, that you can open up to, cry with, and be angry with them. Cling to them. Find happiness in the daily tasks. If you want ice cream, buy a gallon of it. Find your faith and hold on tight. Never give up.”

 

Be careful when sharing good news

 

Knowing others conceive easily when it seems to be anything but simple to someone with infertility, can make a pregnancy announcement sting. It isn’t that your friend isn’t incredibly happy for you, but he or she just wishes their own good news would come.

 

Big surprises in large groups of people can make it difficult for those in an infertility battle to process their emotions. You may consider speaking with them privately so you can also express how much you hope this day comes for them too.

 

“Don’t hide it if you become pregnant,” shared Angela.  Angel and her husband have battled infertility for years, gone through the adoption process and attempted in vitro fertilization (IVF). “Though it’s hard to hear, it’s even harder to hear about a friend being pregnant from someone other than your friend,” she said. “Be upfront. We will put on a happy face though we’re hurting inside. It’s ok. We will grieve the life we hoped we would have, wishing that was us, and then carry on to be excited for you.”

 

 

Beware of language that triggers emotions

 

Be sensitive to the fact that conversations focusing on children or a pregnancy may be difficult. Never complain about children or even jokingly say, “Be glad you don’t have kids!” Try to steer conversations with friends in different directions so your friend doesn’t feel so left out while everyone discusses parenting struggles or their child’s milestones.

 

Never start a sentence with “At least…” Statements like “At least you can get pregnant” after a loss or “At least it happened early,” or “At least you don’t have to gain weight from a pregnancy,” do nothing but invalidate how someone else feels.

 

Lastly, avoid statements such as, “It wasn’t (or “it isn’t”) meant to be.” Not only is this hurtful, but it may also make the individual feel they somehow deserve these difficult circumstances.

 

Don’t try to fix it

 

There are days those struggling with infertility wish to talk about it. Other days they may not feel up to it. When you know life feels especially difficult, always let a friend know you would love to just listen.

 

“Just being a friend is the best thing someone can do,” said Angela. “Don’t try to fix the situation that can’t be fixed. Trust me, anyone going through infertility has already tried everything to fix themselves and the situation they are in. We don’t want to be in it. Just listening and offering hugs and sincere thoughts of ‘that really must be tough’ is all we need.”

 

Don’t avoid them

 

If you don’t know what to say, just give a hug and let her know you are thinking of her. Your support may help more than you know.

 

Sarah responded about her own struggles with a miscarriage followed by over more than a year of waiting to conceive again. She said, “I remember coming back to work after my miscarriage and feeling shocked that so many of my coworkers seemed to avoid me. I had just suffered the most devastating loss of my life, and the majority of them wouldn’t even look me in the eye. A few people didn’t even say anything but gave me a big hug. It helped a lot.”

 

 

During this time as we remember those struggling with their journey to grow their families and anytime you know someone is facing this difficult battle, we want to encourage you to reach out to them. Infertility is a battle that is hardest when the couple facing it feels alone.

 

Infertility is typically diagnosed after a couple has tried unsuccessfully to conceive for twelve months or longer and / or has experienced more than one consecutive miscarriage or stillbirth. If you are struggling to conceive, one of our providers would love to meet with you. Please reach out and make an appointment with MMG Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 

*Names have been changed of some of the individuals interviewed for this article to respect their privacy.

 

Source

1 US Department of Health and Human Services: National Institute of Health. How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? 1 Dec. 2016.

 

Disclaimer


The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.


While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

woman_standing_in_field

Coping with Endometriosis

March is National Endometriosis Awareness Month! If a doctor has diagnosed you with endometriosis, you know how painful experiencing this condition can be. However, we have a few tips you can try to help minimize your discomfort and not let endometriosis get in the way of enjoying your life!

 

What is endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis is a disorder that affects 200 million women worldwide. 1 When a woman has endometriosis, tissue that behave like the lining of the uterus grow outside the uterus. This tissue grows in various places including the fallopian tubes, pelvic lining, ovaries, and in or around the bowel and bladder.

 

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

 

Painful cramps and periods
Periods that are long
Heavy menstrual flow
Nausea and/or vomiting
Pain during sex
Infertility
Bowel and urinary disorders
Chronic fatigue

 

Managing endometriosis

 

Your  physician may recommend various medications and treatments for endometriosis. However, there are some things you can do yourself to help better manage your condition.

 

Diet

 

Add more fruits and vegetables to your diet and minimize your red meat intake. Some studies indicate that increased red meat consumption may greatly increase your chance of suffering from endometriosis while fruits and vegetables can help reduce your chances.  Consuming omega-3 fatty acids found in fish such as  mackerel, sardines, salmon and anchovies can also help.

 

Manage stress

 

Cortisol is a hormone involved in the stress response. Prolonged stress can lead to elevated cortisol levels, a hormone which may decrease progesterone levels. This hormonal imbalance may aggravate endometriosis.

 

Apply Heat

 

A warm bath or heating pad placed on the lower abdomen can help to relax cramping pelvic muscles and reduce pain. Many women may find using heat as effective as pain relievers.

 

Pelvic massage


Some women find relief when being treated by a massage therapist. Massage therapy can help reduce menstruation pain associated with endometriosis. Massaging the pelvic area, including parts of the abdomen, back and sides  shortly before the menstrual period begins is the most beneficial time to seek massage treatment.

 

Rest

 

Especially during menstruation, sufferers of endometriosis should get more rest. Lying on the side with the knees pulled to the chest can help reduce pain and pressure in the back.

 

Exercise

 

Regular exercise helps to release endorphins, the “feel good” hormones that reduce pain. Exercise can also help to lower estrogen levels and improve symptoms.

 

Manage Nausea

 

When pain related to endometriosis is at its worst, women may experience nausea. Ginger is often used to help nausea. Many women drink ginger tea or eat ginger chews.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of endometriosis or need help coping with your endometriosis diagnosis, make an appointment with one of our providers at MMG Gynecology and Obstetrics.

 

Sources

 

1 Endometriosis Foundation of America. What Is Endometriosis? Causes, Symptoms and Treatments.


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