blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus Update for McMahon Tomlinson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

March 14, 2020

 

Dear Resident, Family Member, Resident Responsible Party:

 

We at McMahon Tomlinson Nursing & Rehabilitation Center are striving to maintain a safe environment for our residents, visitors and employees throughout the facility. As you are aware the United States and many countries around the globe are now being affected by the outbreak of the Covid-19 Virus. Due to updated guidance received this morning from the Center for Disease Control. The facility will be implementing the following changes to our visitation practices.

 

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY the facility is restricting all visitation to the facility with the exception of end of life of one of our residents / patients. We will work with family members in this type of instance to allow for visitation of that resident once visitors have been through a health screening.

 

If you need to bring in necessary items to the facility for your resident / patient, (Clothing, Food/Drink, Hygiene Products, etc.) we ask that you do this between the hours of 10am – 1pm and there will be someone at the front entrance of the facility to receive these items and get them to your resident / patient.

 

We are working on alternate forms of communications like (Skype, Face Time, etc.) that once set up can be utilized so families can connect with their resident remotely. When this is in place the facility will notify you by phone.

 

Our facility has been receiving routine updates about the Covid – 19 virus from Local County Emergency Management, Oklahoma State Department of Health and Center for Medicare Services and we will continue to make updates as thing change.

 

I appreciate your understanding and cooperation in keeping our residents and employees safe. The facility will keep you updated as this situation changes. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me at (580) -357-3240.

 

Sincerely,

 

Ricky Coleman, LTCA
McMahon Tomlinson Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

worst foods for heart

10 Foods That Destroy a Healthy Heart

February is Heart Month. There’s no better time to make a decision to keep your heart and cardiovascular system healthy for years to come than right now! Here are 10 foods that you should save for occasional treats or find healthy swaps whenever possible: 

 

Deep-fried foods

Fried snacks, fried chicken, French fries, etc.  increase your risk of heart disease. Conventional frying methods create trans fats. Frans tats are a type of fat that raises bad cholesterol and lowers good cholesterol. 

If you crave fried foods, look for alternative recipes. Examples include recipes that bake, air fry or use healthier oils. Many of these recipes also use mock “vegetable” versions or alternate batters. 

 

Cured and processed meats 

Meats such as sausage and bacon are often high in saturated fat. Even low-fat options, however, tend to be very high in sodium. A few thin slices of deli meat may have half your daily recommended amount of salt! 

High sodium intake is linked to high blood pressure, and avoiding extra salt can greatly improve it. 

 

Fast-food burgers

Saturated fats may contribute to heart disease, their relationship isn’t entirely clear. In general, however, saturated fats from animals, especially in combination with carbohydrates, appear to have a negative effect on heart health. Fast- food restaurants tend to use lower quality ingredients as well as unhealthy cooking methods. Avoiding them is a good way to be kind to your heart. 

 

Candy

Diets high in added sugar may help contribute to inflammation, obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

 

Juices and soft drinks

Check your beverage labels carefully. Many soft drinks and juices contain a ridiculous amount of sugar!

 

Diet soda

You would think the fat-free and zero-calorie version of your favorite soft drink may be a good solution. It may be fat-free and zero-calorie, however, some research suggests that the chemicals in diet soda may alter gastrointestinal bacteria. Altered gut bacteria makes people more prone to weight gain. 

 

Pastries and cookies

Baked goods, especially commercially produced ones, are full of sugar. They also likely contain saturated fats or trans fats.

 

Sugar filled cereals 

Like drinks, breakfast cereals often contain sugar. The consumption of refined carbohydrates and sugars in the morning produces inflammation. This in return makes blood sugar go up and down, increasing sugar cravings throughout the day.  

 

Meat-lovers pizza

Pizza is a food that often contains too much sodium (salt) according to the American Heart Association. The more meat and cheese you add, the worse it gets. When eating pizza, limit yourself to one or two slices and opt for veggie-filled varieties. 

 

Margarine

Trans fats are common in sticks of margarine which are often marketed as a healthier alternative to butter. To be on the safe side, select a soft, spreadable margarine that contains no partially hydrogenated oils. Olive oil is also a better alternative. 

Our CCMH providers commit to helping you live a healthier lifestyle! Find a list of them by visiting CCMHHealth.com/Providers

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Venous Thromboembolism couple

The Third Leading Danger to Your Heart

If asked what the leading vascular diagnosis was, most people would know heart attack and stroke.  However, the third leading cause of danger to your heart is no small matter either. In fact, each year, between 300,000 and 600,000 Americans receive a diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE). 1

VTE has two types: pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT).  Deep vein thrombosis is a clot deep in the vein. When a DVT clot breaks away from a vein wall, travels to the lungs, and then blocks some or all of the blood supply, a pulmonary embolism occurs. 

Pulmonary embolism occurs when the DVT clot breaks away, travels to the lungs and blocks part or all of the blood supply. 

 

Symptoms of venous thromboembolism 

 

Symptoms of deep vein thrombosis often include reddish or bluish skin discoloration, a leg that is warm to touch, leg tenderness or pain and swelling in one leg. 

 

Pulmonary embolism symptoms are sudden shortness of breath, stabbing chest pain that gets worse with each breath, rapid heart rate, and an unexplained cough sometimes accompanied by bloody mucus. 

 

The cause of venous thromboembolism 

 

Venous thromboembolism may be caused by cancer, immobilization surgery, or hospitalization.

Deep vein thrombosis occurs when the flow of blood changes or slows. For women, using hormones like oral contraceptives or estrogen for menopause symptoms can also play a role. Pregnancy may also be a cause of VT. 

 

Who is at risk for venous thromboembolism 

 

Those at risk for clotting and developing VT include:

 

those who are overweight or obese

the elderly 

patients of autoimmune disorders 

patients that overproduce blood cells and have thickened blood 

cancer patients 

 

How to prevent venous thromboembolism 

 

You can lower your risk of VT by staying active and losing weight if needed. Discuss concerns you may have with your doctor and take “blood thinners” if recommended. Follow self-care techniques prescribed by your doctor if you have conditions such as diabetes or heart failure. Also, consider the risk of taking certain medications such as hormones.

 

To learn more about our recent achievements in cardiac care, read about our Primary Heart Attack Center certification

 

Source 

1 American Heart Association. What is Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)? 2020.

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

girl outside in winter

5 Winter Health Facts

From the cold to the flu- we all do our best to avoid winter illnesses. Being cautious and taking measures to avoid these illnesses is always a good practice, but are some of the common steps we take unnecessary? Let’s sort out fact from fiction with these 5 winter health facts! 

 

You don’t get sick because it is cold 

 

The cold itself is not the reason for illness. How soon the temperature changes also has little effect on the spread of illness.  Therefore, habits your mother warned you against such as sleeping with wet hair won’t bring on an illness. 

In the colder months, we spend more time indoors and in close quarters with others and their viruses. This is what causes you to be under the weather.

 

You can’t get the flu from the flu shot 

 

There is no virus in the injection, so it won’t give you the flu. The nasal spray vaccine may cause mild flu symptoms, however. Although receiving the flu shot does not guarantee that you won’t get the flu, it will protect you from the most common strains of flu. Your symptoms won’t be as severe if you do get sick also.

 

You lose little heat through your head 

 

Any uncovered body part is going to lose heat, and you only lose about 10% from your head. Wearing a hat in the cold is always a good idea, but a hat alone is not enough to protect you from the elements. Be sure to appropriately clothe your entire body when out in the elements.  

 

Green mucus is not a sign of a bacterial infection

 

People often think when they cough up green mucus that they have an infection. This actually means that whatever illness you have is coming to an end, however.

Yellow mucus indicates that your body is still fighting whatever is making you sick. Clear mucus is often present at the beginning stages of illness.

 

Shoveling snow increases your risk of heart attack 

 

Although it sounds crazy, this is true! Thankfully, we don’t have to shovel snow very often around here, but this is how it happens: cold constricts your arteries, increasing the demands on your heart. Shoveling then adds to that demand. Shoveling is more stressful on the heart than most winter sports! In a matter of minutes, your heart rate reaches a dangerous point. 

If you are healthy and active, you should not be concerned. Many don’t know they have health problems like high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol, however, so it is best to exercise caution if you need to shovel snow by using a small shovel and taking breaks. 

If you are 60 or older, discuss your winter activities with your doctor. 

 

Has a winter health issue got you down? Reach out to our CCMH Physician Referral Line to find an appointment today! 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

David Elmore receives award

CCMH Receives Awards at Oklahoma Hospital Association (OHA) 2019 Convention

David Elmore (pictured), Lawton MediEquip Manager, received the Oklahoma Hospital Association Spirit of Legacy Award at the OHA Convention, Thursday, November 14th.  The OHA Spirit Award is given annually to exceptional individuals in the hospital community whose exemplary leadership and dedication have significantly enhanced patient care, their organizations and/or their communities. Each year, a different theme is emphasized. For 2019, the theme is the Spirit of Legacy as OHA celebrates 100 years of caring.  Congratulations David.

The Oklahoma Hospital Association has awarded Comanche County Memorial Hospital with an inaugural 2019 Excellence in Quality Award for Pressure Injury Prevention!  We congratulate the Wound Care Nursing Department; Wound Care Nurses – Rebecca Lusher, Tania Huitt, Kristina Kriz, and Penny Ramirez is their direct supervisor.  Congratulations also to Dr. Dave, the Quality Department and Administration for their support. 

Congratulations to Ellie Ellewanger for receiving the Volunteers with Spirit Award at the OHA Convention.  She has volunteered for CCMH for over 20 years.  She is dedicated, compassionate, and loyal.  She volunteers at least three days a week.  CCMH is her second family and the hospital is lucky to have her
hand on vape

Vaping: Myths and Truths

There is an outbreak of lung injury from e-cigarette use or vaping. As of Septemeber 17th, the CDC reports 530 cases of lung injury due to the use of e-cigarette or vaping products across the US and its territories. The CDC also reports seven deaths from complications due to vaping across six different states. 1

The CDC said, “No consistent e-cigarette or vaping product, substance, or additive has been identified in all cases, nor has any one product or substance been conclusively linked to lung disease in patients.” 1

There is much we do not yet know about the effects of vaping, and that unknown causes much fear nationwide. Let’s shed some light on what we do know at this time. 

 

Myth #1: Nicotine is the only chemical in vapes.

There is more to vaping than just nicotine. Vaping is a very popular method of marijuana use. Some individuals even vape herbs. 

This is especially dangerous because there is not a standard among the types and amounts of chemicals in vaping products. This has also made it difficult to discover the exact harms of vaping. Each user’s experience is different due to different flavors, nicotine levels, and devices. 

 

Myth #2: Nicotine causes cancer. 

Nicotine is not a carcinogen. The other chemicals in tobacco products such as formaldehyde and lead, for example, cause cancer. Vape products don’t have these additives which has lead to the false belief that vaping is perfectly safe. 

Nicotine is highly addictive, raises blood pressure, and can harm developing adolescent brains. 

 

Myth #3: Vape products are safe because they don’t burn tobacco.

Clearly nicotine itself is not safe, nor is vaping harmless. There are all kinds of things you consume when you vape, many which are not regulated or well understood. 

So just what do you inhale while vaping? You get nicotine. Nicotine comes from tobacco, and this is why e-cigarettes are a tobacco product. You also get the solvents, the flavors and heavy traces of metal exposure from the heating coil, as well as other tobacco metabolites. 

 Secondary concerns include the potential for harder drug use and the mental effects of addiction and dependence. Addiction and nicotine use are closely associated with other health disorders such as depression, stress, and anxiety. Depressions individuals may be more likely to abuse substances. These substances may lead to additional feelings of depression. 

 

Truth #1: Vaping is an epidemic among our youth. 

Although not everyone who vapes is a young person, there is a strong culture of vaping among teens and the slightly older Gen-Z adults. Vaping is cleverly marketed as the new thing in smoking, it’s new technology, and it is customizable with trendy colors, flavors, and sleek devices. There is an obvious appeal to it among the younger crowd, complete with the lie for parents that it’s safer than cigarettes. 

 

Truth #2: Not everyone is aware of the dangers of vaping. 

The US government, schools, and health organizations do an amazing job of informing our youth about the dangers of smoking cigarettes. Facts and media to inform youth of the harms of the vaping trend, however, are still catching up. 

The medical community is fighting to catch up to this fast-growing trend. Research takes time.  Until we have evidence which provides clear results for specific vaping regulations, the real dangers of vaping and e-cigarette remain concerningly unknown. 

 

If you need help to break an addiction to nicotine or tobacco products, please reach out to one of our providers. You can find them on our CCMH Provider Directory.

 

Source

1 Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Outbreak of Lung Injury Associated with E-Cigarette Use, or Vaping.19. Sept. 2019.

 

Disclaimer  

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

woman blowing dandelion in summer

Summer Safety

The summer season is a special time for many of us. There are holidays, outdoor activities and lots of sunshine to enjoy. However, during the summer, there are some unique safety concerns all should take to heart. Here are our top tips to help you enjoy a beautiful, relaxing, and injury free summer!

 

Boating safety 

 

Many boating accidents begin with alcohol, but water and alcohol really don’t mix well! Avoid drinking alcohol and boating to prevent injuries like drowning and boat collisions. 

 

Don’t be lax about lifejackets either. Make sure you have proper fitting life jackets for all passengers. Children and those who cannot swim especially should never go without their life jackets while boating. 

 

Also make sure you know what to do in case of a water accident. Visit the American Heart Association website at Heart.org to learn where you can take courses in CPR and First Aid training. These classes are simple, and you never know when you may help save a life! 

 

Driving safety 

 

Operating a motor vehicle after drinking is, of course, also a bad idea. If your summer plans include a road trip, take breaks every few hours to avoid fatigue while driving. Also, avoid driving after midnight. 

 

Avoid harmful insects 

 

To avoid bees, mosquitoes and other insects,  avoid wearing heavy perfumes, especially floral scents, wear light-colored clothing free of floral patterns, and keep a lid on sugary drinks like sodas. For mild insect bite reactions, patients may take acetaminophen for pain and an antihistamine for swelling. 

 

Seek emergency care when the following symptoms are present: 

 

Difficulty breathing

Hives, itchiness, and swelling over large areas of the body

Swelling of the face or tongue

Dizziness or feeling faint 

 

Hydrate 

 

Dehydration and heat stroke are common problems in the summer months, although, both can be easily prevented. Ensure everyone has plenty of water when spending time outdoors, take breaks in the shade whenever possible, and try to plan outdoor activities in the early morning or evening to avoid the hottest part of the day.  

 

Some of the symptoms of heat stroke include:

 

a core temperature of 104F or higher

confusion

rapid heart rate and breathing

headache 

nausea or vomiting

 

If you fear someone may be experiencing heat stroke or severe dehydration, call 911. Get the individual indoors as soon as possible, cool them with ice packs or wet washcloths, give them water and have them lie down while you wait for emergency assistance. 

 

Cover up

 

Sunlight can be dangerous for your eyes and skin. Wear sunglasses that filter out UV light. Stay in the shade, wear hats and apply sunscreen that has an SPF of 30 or higher, is water resistant, and provides broad-spectrum coverage every two hours while outdoors. 

 

Prevent food poisoning 

 

Picnic season is often when many individuals encounter food poisoning. To avoid it, practice the following: 

 

Clean your hands and the surfaces where you are preparing food well.

Keep raw meats wrapped and away from other food items. 

Have a meat thermometer with you for grilling to ensure meat reaches a safe internal temperature. 

Keep everything cool as long as possible. Store perishable picnic foods in an insulated cooler of ice. Keep whatever you will eat last at the bottom of the cooler. 

 

 

We hope you enjoy a safe and happy summer. If you need emergency medical care however, we’re here for you at the Drewry Family Emergency Center at Comanche County Memorial Hospital!

 

 

Disclaimer 

 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

people on crowded beach

Zika Impact on 2019 Summer Travel

In 2015 and 2016 especially, pregnant women or those hoping to conceive faced the Zika virus. This mosquito borne illness spreads mostly through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. These mosquitoes live in tropical, subtropical, and some temperate climates. They are also the main species of mosquito that spread other illnesses such as dengue and chikungunya.

 

Why Zika is a concern for women 

 

Zika passes from infected men to women during intercourse. Zika may also pass from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause an increased risk of pregnancy loss and severe birth defects such as microcephaly. Microcephaly is a condition that causes a smaller than normal head and developmental issues. 

 

How does Zika spread? 

 

Because the Aedes mosquitoes live near and feed on people, they are more likely to spread the virus than other mosquitoes. The CDC estimates that this mosquito can thrive within the majority of the U.S. states and countries throughout the world. Given this great range, completely avoiding Zika risk is impossible although there are certain precautions travelers can take to avoid the illness. 

 

What is the current risk for Zika worldwide?

 

No country is currently reporting a Zika outbreak. However, the CDC’s most recent stance regarding the illness is that “Zika continues to be a problem in many parts of the world.” 1 Those pregnant or planning a pregnancy should take precautions. 

 

What should pregnant couples or couples trying to conceive do to prevent Zika?

 

The CDC recommends that pregnant women should avoid traveling to any area during a Zika outbreak. Even though no countries are experiencing an outbreak at this time, it is also recommended that pregnant women or those planning to conceive in upcoming months talk to their health care provider to weigh the risks before travel. 

 

The CDC also recommends men who are exposed to the virus use condoms throughout their partner’s pregnancy. If a man is exposed and planning a pregnancy, trying to conceive should be delayed and condoms should be used for three months. 

 

Have concerns about Zika? Reach out to a CCMH Provider via our online directory at CCMHhealth.com/Directory.

 

Source

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Zika Travel Information. 2019.

 

Disclaimer 

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. CCMH does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the CCMH website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

 

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

LCHC Logo

LCHC Set to Open Two New Clinics

Comanche County Memorial Hospital is excited to announce the opening of two new LCHC clinics to serve more families in Comanche County. On July 22, a brand new LCHC Cache clinic will open its doors to that community located at 512 C Avenue. in Cache. LCHC is also in the process of transitioning the OU Family Medicine Residency Clinic located at 1202 NW Arlington Avenue in Lawton into a new LCHC clinic that will be named LCHC Midtown.

Comanche County Hospital and LCHC leaders have been working with the OU Residency Program leadership since the announcement of closing down their Southwest Oklahoma Family Medicine Residency Program and clinic in Lawton. LCHC Midtown will continue to serve the current patients of the clinic and provide healthcare to new patients in and around the Lawton area.

“LCHC is pleased to step in and continue providing vital healthcare for this area of the community; therefore no patient will have to go without consistent care. CCMH, LCHC & OU leaders are actively working to minimize any downtime during this transition,” said Sean McAvoy, Executive Director of Primary Care.

The LCHC Midtown has been able to employ most of the current staff. The new clinic will be staffed by Dr. Daniel Joyce, Tom Mills PA-C, and Amy Hannington PA-C. This clinic will also add a pediatric provider in August. The LCHC Midtown is scheduled to open on August 12th. Open Houses are being scheduled for both new clinics, the times and dates to be determined.

Lawton Community Health Center has served the residents of Comanche County and surrounding counties since January 2008. LCHC clinics are located in Lawton, Comanche, Elgin and Marlow communities. LCHC provides family practice and pediatric services to individuals with Medicaid (SoonerCare), Medicare, and private insurance. LCHC also provides healthcare to those residents who do not have health insurance on a sliding fee schedule. Patients are required to provide proof of income to ensure they receive discounts for which they are eligible.

For more information or to make an appointment with LCHC Midtown please call 580-248-2288 or LCHC Cache please call 580-699-7361.

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