blood

Why Blood Donations are so Important

June 14th is known world-wide as World Blood Donor Day!  Organizations around the globe celebrate this special event that raises awareness of the importance of donating blood for the health industry.  Blood donations have helped aid the world on many emergency situations. Blood uses are great and more unique than many realize from aiding in research to plasma donations which provide enough blood for more than two people.

Here are a few interesting facts about blood and how your donations save lives:

 

The beginnings of  World Blood Donor Day

The first successful blood donation did not occur with humans. It was a successful transfuse of blood between two dogs. This led to the discovery of the ABO human blood type system which determines possible donor-recipient relationships.

World Blood Donor Day first took place in 2005. June 14th is when we commemorate this special day as it is the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, Austrian biologist, physician, and immunologist, who discovered the various blood types.

World Blood Donor Day raises awareness of the need for regular blood donations and the importance of keeping the health industry with a stable supply. It also celebrates hardworking medical professionals in the research and development of new technologies and uses for blood donations. Last, but certainly not least, this day thanks blood donors for the contribution to improving the lives of others.

 

Facts about blood and donations

Approximately 4.5 million Americans receive a blood transfusion annually.

The four elements of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, all floating in plasma.

The average adult has 10 – 12 pints of blood.

There are eight blood types:  A, B, AB, and O. All blood types come in either positive or negative Rh Factor.

Rh, ” Rhesus factor”, is a protein that lives on the surface of the red blood cells. Those with it are positive and those without are negative.

Rh positive people can receive either kind of blood for transfusions, but Rh negative people can only receive Rh negative blood.

Type O negative is the universal blood type that can be used by anyone.

Blood has a great shelf life of 42 days for red blood cells, a year for plasma and frozen platelets for 5 days.

The largest blood donation drive occurred when 61,902 participants donated blood all across India.

 

The need for blood in the U.S.

Making a blood donation is quick, easy, and incredibly safe. However, of the people who are eligible, only about 10 percent choose to do so. Because blood donations are voluntary, World Blood Donor Day is an important reminder that the supply of blood is never too great!  In the United States alone, a patient needs blood every two seconds!

Many developed countries rely on voluntary, unpaid blood donations to reach 100% of their blood supply needs. However, obtaining volunteers and ensuring blood is safe is still a big issue in developing countries. When the supply is low, recipients must rely on family or paid donations. The WHO works hard to ensure that blood donations worldwide will one day be entirely unpaid and voluntary.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

summer sunglasses

Summer Habits to Establish and Continue All Year

We have had some incredible weather so far this spring! The official first day of summer will be here before you know it! As you are participating in all the outdoor activities of summer, there are many things to remember to help keep you healthier and enjoying during these warmer months. 

 

Here are our 7 summer health tips to implement this summer and the rest of the year as well. Some of us are better at remembering to do these tasks during the summer, but truly these are great tips to remember year-round!

 

Protect your skin

 

The sun’s rays are strongest during the summer months. Your skin is your largest organ and the first line of defense against the elements, so treat it well! However, summer is not the only time to remember sunscreen!  Your skin is still exposed every day. You probably don’t need to apply sunscreen as frequently as a summer day at the beach, but it is still a good idea to remember a little sunscreen daily, no matter the season or weather. 

 

Stay hydrated 

 

 With heat exhaustion and heatstroke serious summer threats, we tend to be more mindful of thirst in the summer. It’s important to stay hydrated, not just when you feel parched in the heat. Once summer passes, you may not feel as parched. Staying hydrated is still crucial to keeping your body at its best, however.

If you struggle with drinking enough water, buy a big jug you can fill up and keep near you all day. You need to drink approximately half of your weight in ounces of water every day.

 

Protect your eyes

 

Sunglasses are more than shade for your eyes and a fashion statement. Without them, you’re at the mercy of harmful UV rays and “blue light.”  This exposure puts you at risk for macular degeneration, cataracts, and eyelid cancer. Furthermore, sunglasses aid with more comfortable and improved vision from not having to squint. Sunglasses just might keep more than just your eyes safe as well. Good vision is especially important when you’re participating in outdoor sports. 

 

Get moving more 

 

Sunny summer days and evenings beckon us outdoors to soak up the sun, but don’t let dreary days in the fall, winter, or spring keep you from getting some exercise. If you have an office job on top of that, it can seem difficult to get moving. Get a fitness tracker to help you make sure you’re getting your steps in around the office or consider getting a standing desk to get you on your feet to keep exercise in focus year-round. 

 

 

Don’t leave swimming to the kids 

 

Swimming is excellent exercise for the entire family. As a low-impact exercise, anyone can do it. Just thirty minutes of light to moderate lap swimming may burn over 230 calories! Unless you are fortunate enough to live in a very temperate climate though, swimming is not enjoyable for much of the year. However, you may have a good indoor swimming pool available. Many gyms do, such as our local Family YMCA

 

Protect yourself from mosquitoes 

 

West Nile and Zika viruses are mosquito bite spread conditions and are no joke! Insect repellants can help. Also, cover exposed skin whenever possible and avoid going outside during dawn and dusk hours when mosquitoes are active. Remember not to scratch when you do get a bite! It will only make the itch worse! 

 

Eat seasonal foods

 

When you think of eating fresh, seasonal veggies and fruits, you probably think of summertime. In summer months, we tend to eat more fruits and veggies because they’re fresh. This can help us stay away from unhealthy snacks. Strawberries and tomatoes may not always be in season, but don’t forget fall superfoods around the corner. Brussels sprouts, pumpkins, and apples can be just as delicious and are also excellently healthy! 

 

If you are in need of a checkup or to find a new provider, summer is a great time to plan to do so when winter cold germs and the flu are lingering. Check out our list of providers at ccmhhealth.com/providers.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

hiking

Take a Hike for National Physical Fitness and Sports Month!

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. There’s no better time to get moving than now! Many of us do not get 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise that the Department of Health and Human Services recommends we participate in weekly. If sports are not for you, this is not an excuse to be inactive. You may not be competitive or like the organization of team sports; there are still many great activities to partake in that benefit your health.

One activity that is easy to do in our area is hiking. Hiking is a great stress-relieving activity. You can hike alone or with family and friends. You can obtain maps to hiking trails in our beloved Wichita Mountains from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge Visitors’ Center.

 

What are the dangers of inactivity?

Inactivity may lead to a variety of health issues. Some of these problems include obesity, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease,  coronary heart disease,  diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

 

What are the benefits of hiking?

Besides being a stress-relieving activity, hiking has many other amazing health benefits such as

enhanced mental wellbeing
improved mood
lower blood pressure
reduced risk for heart disease
a healthier weight
lower cholesterol levels
improved bone density
lower body fat
increased flexibility and coordination
improved osteoarthritis outcomes
better quality of life
enhanced relationships with friends and family

Furthermore, during this time of social distancing due to COVID-19, hiking is a great activity that allows you to get some exercise and responsibly distance from others while enjoying the outdoors.

 

How to get started hiking

Before you hit the trail, make sure you study the trail and choose one that will meet your ability level. Also, consider the following questions:

How much time you have?

What is the elevation gain of the hike? For reference, a gain of 1,000 feet in one mile is considered steep.

What type of weather is expected during your trip?

Do you need to make transportation arrangements if your hike ends in a different place than it began?

 

What to take hiking

Here some items you should consider to keep your hike safe and enjoyable:

Think about wearing layers if the weather is changing throughout the hike. You may need warmer or cooler clothing as well as rain gear.

Consider taking a First Aid kit in case of small injuries such as scrapes or insect bites.

Make sure you have proper footwear. This article has some great tips on choosing a good hiking boot type and fit.

Pack healthy, energy-boosting snacks and plenty of water.

Last, but not least, a good hiking backpack is a great help in storing all your needed gear and leaving your hands free to aid in safely moving you along.

 

John Burroughs, American naturalist said, “I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put together.” We hope you find the same benefits and improved health from hiking in the great outdoors around this beautiful land we call home!

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hospital week

Celebrating National Hospital Week

As we celebrate National Hospital Week, Comanche County Memorial Hospital would like to recognize the men and women who work hard every day to provide high quality, compassionate care for patients and their families. Not only are we committed to keeping you and your loved ones safe throughout this pandemic, but we are also maintaining the exceptional care you deserve and can expect from CCMH. Our hospital is more than a place where people go for care, it’s a part of the Lawton community that fosters health & wellness and represents hope!

man with face mask

The Truth about Face Masks

It has been said that we are in a fight against a pandemic as well as a fight against misinformation. Misinformation may even be the bigger fight we face in a world of social media where anyone can easily have a platform and spread information that is not just false, it’s dangerous!

One of the trending topics on social media through the COVID-19 fight is whether or not face masks protect you from the spread of a virus. Some articles even claim wearing a mask is more harmful to your health! In this article, we hope to separate fact from fiction and provide a few tips to help protect you and your family from the virus.

 

How face masks protect from the spread of COVID-19

Can face masks help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus  (COVID-19)? Most certainly, face masks in combination with other preventive measures such as social distancing, help slow the spread of viruses.

You may wonder why then, were face masks not the recommendation at the start of the pandemic? At the time, experts didn’t yet know the extent to which  COVID-19 could spread before symptoms appeared. Nor did we know that some affected persons are asymptomatic. This means that the virus spreads between people interacting in close proximity. For example, vapor droplets spread as individuals speak, cough, or sneeze near each other—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms.

It is also important to remember that we discussed last week that data shows that individuals may not show symptoms for 2-11 days after infection.

 

Should you wear a mask?

These discoveries led the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to recommend face masks for the general public. Some public health groups argue that masks should not be for the general public to protect the supply for health care workers fighting the virus on the “frontlines.”  A critical shortage of surgical masks and N95 masks took place at the beginning of the pandemic. The CDC acknowledged this concern and recommended cloth masks for the public, not surgical and N95 masks our health care providers use. The CDC then updated its guidance to simple cloth face coverings in public to help prevent transmission of COVID-19 by those who may have the virus and not know it.

 

How do different types of face masks work?

N95 masks

N95 masks are actually a type of respirator. They offer more protection than a surgical mask does because it filters out both large and small particles. N95 earned its name because it blocks 95% of very small particles. N95 masks are designed to be disposable. However, research is ongoing to make N95s reuseable.

 

Surgical masks

Also called a medical mask, a surgical mask fits loosely, is disposable, and protects the nose and mouth from contact with droplets that could contain germs. A surgical mask also filters out large particles. Surgical masks help protect others as they reduce exposure to the respiratory secretions and saliva of the mask wearer.

At this time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved any type of surgical mask specifically for protection against the COVID-19 virus, but these masks may provide some protection when N95 masks are not available.

 

Cloth masks

While the supply of N95s and surgical masks is not great, cloth masks are more accessible, reusable, and easy to make out of a variety of materials. Cloth masks still help slow the spread of COVID-19. Cloth masks help protect others in case the wearer has the virus. An N95 mask, on the other hand, helps protect the wearer from getting the virus. However, if we all do our part, the transmission of the virus as a whole is less to all our friends and neighbors.

Countries that quickly implemented rules regarding testing, face masks, isolation, and social distancing early in the pandemic seem to have had some success at slowing the spread of COVID-19. Common sense, of course, is that some protection is better than none. Wearing a cloth face mask loses all of its value, however, if it isn’t combined with frequent hand-washing and social distancing.

Cloth masks are cheap and simple to make. Instructions are easy to find online. Masks can be made from everyday materials, like sheets made of tightly woven cotton. The CDC has published instructions for no-sew masks made from T-shirts and bandanas. Cloth masks should have multiple layers of fabric.

 

How do I wear a cloth face mask?

Wear a cloth face mask when you are in a public place where it is difficult to maintain social distance, especially in “high traffic” places like the grocery store.

 

Pointers for mask placement and removal:

Position the mask over your nose and mouth.
Secure the mask behind your head or use ear loops.
Don’t touch the mask while wearing it.
Wash or sanitize your hands if you accidentally touch the mask.
Untie the mask or lift it off the ear loops without touching your face or the front of the mask.
Immediately wash your hands after removing the mask.
Wash your mask with soap and water in the washing machine after each wear.

 

Face mask safety precautions:

Don’t put masks on anyone who cannot remove the mask without help, has difficulty breathing, or is unconscious.
Use masks only on those age two and older.
Don’t consider face masks as an alternative to social distancing.

 

Have other questions about COVID-19? Visit ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

women with covid-19

Do I Need to be Tested for COVID-19?

As new information emerges during the evolving COVID-19 Pandemic, it seems you can find an article with just about any possible symptom pointing to COVID-19. You may begin to wonder, “Do I have COVID-19?” Information you gather from reliable, medically-based sources may be useful. However, research should never replace the assessment of a physician. These are unusual circumstances though. During the time of social distancing when seeking medical treatment may put you more at risk for coming in contact with this novel coronavirus, there are a few questions you can use to self-assess.

 

 

Here are the questions to consider:

 

Do you have any of the following emergency symptoms?

If you have emergency COVID-19 signs and symptoms, such as chest pain or pressure, confusion, trouble breathing, or blue lips or face, seek medical care immediately! A trip to the ER or call to 911 sounds necessary. Let the emergency operator know your symptoms and wear a face covering over your mouth and nose if being transported by ambulance. The phone number for our emergency department is (580) 355-8620.

 

Do you have any of the following symptoms?

New trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or wheezing may all be symptoms that point to COVID-19. Other symptoms include muscle aches, sore throat, diarrhea, loss of smell, change in taste, a cough, and a fever. Generally, patients suffering from COVID-19 have a fever of 100.5 or greater.

 

Consider your contact with others

Have you been within 6 feet of someone with a confirmed case of COVID-19? Did you see him or her for at least 5 minutes, or have direct contact with their saliva or mucus at any point in the past 14 days? Does the person with COVID-19 live with you?

According to the CDC, although we are still learning about how the virus transmits, it is thought to spread mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets. These droplets reach others when the infected person coughs or sneezes. When these droplets land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or the person inhales them into their lungs, they may also become infected.

The incubation period is the time someone comes in contact with the virus until symptoms are present. For COVID-19, the incubation period is typically 2-11 days. To be safe, health professionals are asking patients to consider who he or she has come in contact with within a two week period.

 

If you feel it is possible you may have COVID-19, self isolate if you are not in need of immediate care, and reach out to your medical provider by phone. He or she will advise you how it is best to act.

 

 

Do you have other questions about COVID-19? Check out or resources at ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

COVID-19 travel

Traveling During A Pandemic

Traveling during a pandemic is an unnerving thought. There may be instances that make it unavoidable for you such as going to care for a sick loved one or traveling for an essential work trip. What if you have to enter an area where the virus is spreading rampantly? What if you are in the middle of the spread and don’t even know it? Many concerns probably enter your mind at this time. Having a plan to make your travel as safe as possible will help you feel more in control, decrease any anxiety, and accomplish whatever you need to do.

 

Before travel 

Prepare your immune system. Travel is often stressful under good circumstances, making illnesses possible. Take as good of care of yourself as possible in days before leaving. Take your vitamins, eat well, and get adequate sleep.

Traveling internationally? Ensure you are up-to-date on all vaccines. Research any common health concerns for travel within your destination and have over the counter medications in case these illnesses arise. Know the country’s travel recommendations.

Take hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, and sanitizing spray. Pack as many changes of clothes and essentials in a carryon bag as possible if you are traveling by plane including snacks. This helps limit your need to wander within the airport. In fact, if you can avoid checking a bag, this is even better as it helps limit your time within the airport and the germs you come into contact with.

Also, pack items you would be handed in a drive-thru if you plan on purchasing a meal. Having your own utensils, napkins, kleenex, even toilet paper limits your contact with items others have touched.

Have a plan for what you will do if you get sick. Do you have telemedicine available through health insurance? Do you know which clinics are offering care in your destination area? What is the COVID-19 screening protocol for the area?

Research the latest expectations within your destination city as far as shelter in place orders or expectations while being in public.

 

Driving tips

Take as many items as you can with you to limit your need for stops:

Pack meals, snacks, and bottled water.

Frequently clean often touched areas such as your steering wheel, stereo buttons, and door handles.

 

Flying tips

If you can print your boarding pass and check-in at home, do!

Arrive on time, but try not to spend more time in the airport than necessary.

Avoid sitting in crowded areas at the airport. As departure time draws near, consider moving to a nearby, but less busy gate as people tend to crowd near the gate.

Expect your travel to be interrupted. Have contingency plans in case flights are canceled.

Some good news is that because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily. However, still, remember to practice good hygiene and avoid sitting near those who are coughing or appear sick.

 

When you reach your destination 

Shower as soon as possible. Place the clothes you wore during travel into a sealed plastic bag.

If you’re staying in a hotel, wipe down items that are often skipped by cleaning crews such as door handles, light switches, and TV remotes.

You may be in a less affected area with looser restrictions than your home. However, be considerate. You may be unknowingly bringing the virus to that community!

 

After returning home 

Consider quarantining yourself for 14 days if possible. If you know for sure you have come into contact with those who have COVID-19, DO quarantine yourself for sure!

Take your temperature a couple times a day.

If you need to seek medical care, let the medical provider know you have traveled before arriving at the facility.

 

If you have other questions related to COVID-19, check out our COVID-19 resources page.

 

Source 

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD)

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

coronavirus annoucement

Coronavirus Update

CCMH continues to employ new up-to-date practices in the fight against COVID-19. We have two very exciting announcements! First, CCMH has recently acquired the ability to test for COVID-19 in-house! CCMH is now able to test patients in the ED for COVID-19 before being admitted to the hospital. The chemicals needed to run these tests are very limited, so we are only able to test those patients that need hospital admission. These tests allow for quicker placement of patients, and lets us continue to preserve PPE within the hospital.

Second, CCMH recently partnered with the Mayo Clinic in a clinical trial using COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma for acutely-ill patients. This plasma comes from patients who have already recovered from COVID-19, and contains antibodies that can help fight the virus. The process of using convalescent plasma has been known to the scientific community for decades, but the number of COVID-19 recovered patients has finally gotten high enough to begin collecting this plasma. CCMH is proud to take part in this study and do the most for our patients and the Lawton community.

For more information and the latest updates on COVID-19, you can visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov and www.cdc.gov.

kid with covid 19

FAQS: Covid-19 and Children

You have probably heard that children are less susceptible to COVID-19. However, it is understandable that parents are concerned for their children in regard to a novel virus that we are still learning about. Here is a summary of frequently asked questions parents have asked about the virus based on research provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

 

Should my child wear a mask?

Children 2 years or older should wear a mask or cloth covering over their nose and mouth when in public. Of course, getting a toddler to wear a mask may present a challenge. Having a fabric they choose, letting them “help” make their mask if you make a homemade mask, and explaining that you will wear one too may help.

The CDC recommends wearing a mask in addition to social distancing, NOT in place of social distancing. Remember that the incubation period for the virus is around two weeks in some cases. So even if your child has no symptoms, wearing a covering could protect them from spreading the virus if he or she is asymptomatic.

 

Do children with COVID-19 have different symptoms than adults?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are the same for adults and children. Children, however, usually have milder symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, including cough, fever and runny nose. Some have also reported vomiting and diarrhea.

Parents of children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs should be cautious. We are still learning if certain conditions put children at higher risk.

 

How do I keep my child safe during the COVID-19 outbreak?

Practice the same advice given to adults. Limit your child’s contact with others outside of the home and practice social distancing. Limit your child’s interaction with elder adults and those at high risk as much as possible. Although COVID-19 may be milder for children, children often spread illnesses due to not having a hygiene routine.

Help children to develop a good hygiene routine by observing you. For younger children, you may which to teach them songs about handwashing or show them cartoons about developing a good hygiene routine. Slightly older children may benefit from videos

Children should not be going to playdates and other activities. If you must take your child to daycare because you are required to work outside of your home in an essential business, ensure your daycare is working to maintain your child’s safety at this time. The CDC has given special guidance for how daycare centers should operate during the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

No matter what, try to remain calm and limit your young child’s exposure to media. This is a difficult, confusing time for all of us. Maintaining a happy home and making the most of the situation by creating good memories of this time for children is so important. If you need ideas of how to thrive while isolating, check out this recent article.

 

For more resources on COVID-19, visit: ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

working out during COVID-19

Staying Fit in Isolation

Much like the joke that freshman college students gain the “freshmen fifteen” a trending hashtag on social media is #quarantine15. Due to the stress, loneliness, and uncertainty of this time, you may wish to turn to food for comfort and to destress.

 

Passing the time by trying a new recipe, cooking with your significant other or children, or celebrating little blessings with a special dessert at this time, are all great ways to make the most of a stressful situation.

 

Don’t feel guilty if you take a break from the normal routine or gain a few pounds as you try to get a handle on all the difficult emotions you may be facing at this time. However, staying healthy could not be more important than at a time like now.

 

Free home workout options

The easiest way to begin an at-home workout routine is through the guidance of instructor-led videos. Many of these videos require no additional equipment and give you the benefit of being able to pause them to perfect your technique.

Many companies are offering their workouts for free or as an extended trial as COVID-19 runs its course. So there’s no better time than now to try out a new workout and establish a good routine.

Here are a variety of workouts by leading companies in fitness that you can try at this time for free.

 

Peloton

Peloton produces top of the line treadmills and exercise bikes. Their workout app is normally $13 a month. However, Peloton is currently offering a free, 90-day trial. You do not have to own their equipment to use the app. The videos include strength, yoga, meditation, boot camp, and cardio classes. If you’re still able to get outdoors, audio-only classes are available for outdoor running.

 

CorePower Yoga

CorePower shut down their studio and moved to online-only classes that you can stream from their website. New classes are added weekly, including yoga, sculpt, and meditation. The company is offering some free classes while the studio remains closed, but you can also gain access to all of their videos for $19.99 per month.

 

Nike Training Club

Nike Training Club offers an always free workout app with a wide variety of home workouts, including programs that help you set a workout schedule. The app allows you to filter your search results based on the equipment you have available also.

 

Les Mills

If you’ve ever had a membership at a gym, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of Body Pump, a popular class, managed by Les Mills. Les Mills also offers dance, yoga, and boxing, many equipment free classes. All their classes are available on-demand with a 30-day free trial.

 

Amazon Prime Video

If you have an Amazon Prime membership, you already have free access to a library of fitness videos, like Zumba and cardio programs. Just search for “fitness,” then check the “Prime” box in the left sidebar to see what’s available for free streaming.

 

YouTube 

YouTube is a great place to find all sorts of exercise videos. Try something creative like rebounding if you have a trampoline at home or learn some new dance moves. Consider using Fitness Blender, a great library of over 100 free workouts.

 

Basic workout equipment under $100

There is plenty you can do without a single piece of equipment and many of us have financial concerns to consider due to the COVID-19 outbreak. However, if you can afford to invest in some equipment, here is a list of more affordable options which can be ordered via Amazon or various websites. We’ll link to them, but,of course, we cannot guarantee their availability when you read this article:

 

Jump rope

Workout mat 

Dumbbells

Lacrosse ball

Foam roller 

Yoga block

 

Have questions about COVID-19? We’re here for you. Check out ccmhhealth.com/covid-19-resources.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

1 2 3 4