4 juul devices on table

Juuling Much More Dangerous than Teens Realize

Kick Butts Day takes place on March 20, 2019. This national day of activism empowers our nation’s youth to take a stand against the tobacco industry. The initiative expects  more than 1,000 anti-tobacco events across our nation and the world.

This year’s campaign will focus on e-cigarette usage (juuling) among our nation’s youth. U.S. public health officials named youth e-cigarette use an “epidemic”. This trend is raising up our next generation with a harmful and addictive tobacco habit.

According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the organizer of the initiative, cigarette smoking among high schoolers nationwide has dropped to 8.1%. However, e-cigarette usage among high schoolers rose an alarming 78% in 2018 alone. This is 20.8% of the student population. Furthermore, this means in 2018, more than 3.6 million middle and high school students used e-cigarettes. 1

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids encourages health advocates and youth to call for strong action to put a halt to the youth e-cigarette epidemic. Particularly, they urge the FDA as well as state and local governments to ban tobacco products the industry clearly markets to youth. This also includes flavored tobacco products such as e-cigarettes or Juuls that taste like gummy bear, mango and cotton candy. According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, research shows that flavors play a key role in the appeal of tobacco products for kids. 1

 

Why are Juuls so popular among youth?

 

Juul electronic cigarettes released on the market in 2015. Using any type of e-cigarette or vape has skyrocketed. However, this particular brand remains the most popular among teens and young adults. Because it makes up more than half of e-cigarette sales, Juul usage is an immediate public health concern.

The manufacturer cleverly markets Juul e-cigarettes to appear techy, sleek, and easy to conceal. Furthermore, they look just like USB flash drives and can even charge in a USB port on your computer. The device is also small enough to fit in a closed hand. For decades we have preached about the dangers of cigarettes to our youth. Juuls, however, don’t look anything like the traditional tobacco products we urge kids to avoid.

Also, kids do not refer to using a Juul as “smoking,” but as “juuling,” further disassociating the trend from the dangerous tobacco usage that it is.

Juuling delivers nicotine faster, more efficiently, and at higher doses than other e-cigarettes. In return, this increases users’ risk of addiction. Each Juul cartridge of nicotine liquid (Juul pod) contains as much nicotine as whole pack of cigarettes. Many Juul users don’t realize the product always contains nicotine.  

 

Why is juuling especially harmful for teens?

 

Not only is juuling dangerous for kids, but it may be even more so than for adults.

A 2016 Surgeon General’s report concluded that youth use of nicotine is unsafe, addictive and can even harm the developing adolescent brain. 2

Similarly, a report that was published by the JAMA Network after pediatric research concluded that e-cigarette use increases the risk of youth ever using combustible tobacco cigarettes later in life. 3

 

We encourage you to discuss tobacco usage including new trends like juuling with the youth in your life. For more resources, you can visit Kickbuttsday.org.

Our CCMH health providers are also dedicated youth advocates and are always willing to discuss tobacco use with you or your child. To find a CCMH provider to meet your needs, visit our online directory at http://ccmhhealth.com/directory.  

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the CCMH website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet your medical needs.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

 

Sources

1 Torres, Gustavo. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. Kicking Juul: Youth take action to reverse e-cigarette epidemic.19 Mar 2019.

2 United States. Public Health Service. E-cigarette use among youth and young adults : a report of the Surgeon General. 2016. 

3  Watkins PhD, Shannon Lea; Glantz PhD, Stanton A. ; Chaffee, DDS, PhD, Benjamin W. JAMA Network. Association of Noncigarette Tobacco Product Use With Future Cigarette Smoking Among Youth in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2015.

 

 

CCMH Receives Regents Business Partnership Excellence Award

CCMH Receives Regents Business Partnership Excellence Award

Western Oklahoma State College has a long-standing partnership with Comanche County Memorial Hospital. WOSC established its nursing program in 1981 and opened an additional site location in Lawton on the Cameron University campus in 2003. CCMH offers access to the most critical areas of nursing care. From 2004-2011, CCMH has donated more than $850,000 to support the WOSC nursing program. CCMH has also provided an excellent clinical experience for the nursing students with many of CCMH’s own employees serving as clinical instructors for the program. In 2018, WOSC started an online LPN-to-RN track as part of the nursing program and is scheduled to graduate more than 100 nursing students in 2019. WOSC continues to partner with CCMH to research ways to expand the nursing program in the Lawton area. This partnership provides well-trained, highly educated registered nurses to meet the health care needs of southwest Oklahoma.

energy drinks sitting on table

The Dangers of Energy Drinks

When life is busy, many of us are tempted to grab an energy drink to put a little extra pep in our step. However, research continues to find concerning effects after consuming these popular beverages. Consuming multiple energy drinks in a short time or consuming energy drinks in combination with other caffeinated or alcoholic beverages, can be especially harmful.  

Some lawmakers are even attempting to ban the sale of energy drinks to those under the age of 18. These legislative efforts occurred following tragic events such as the death of a sixteen-year- old boy from South Carolina. Davis Cripe suffered a cardiac episode that led to his death after consuming an energy drink, coffee and Mountain Dew in less than an hour. 1

 

What are the harmful ingredients in energy drinks?

 

The main ingredients of most energy drinks are caffeine and sugar. However, many experts believe it isn’t necessarily the caffeine in energy drinks that is harmful. After all, most healthy individuals who do not typically experience adverse effects from caffeine can safely consume 4-5 cups of coffee per day without problem.

The problem lies in the amount of sugar and caffeine. Many energy drinks have as much caffeine as 3-4 cups of coffee and more than the recommended amount of sugar you should consume in one day.

There are additional herbal stimulants found in energy drinks that are not regulated by the FDA. These ingredients in combination with high sugar and caffeine content may be the cause of serious or fatal problems for some consumers. 2

 

What happens after drinking an energy drink?


Twenty minutes after ingesting an energy drink, you experience a sugar high. This blood sugar spike results in a quick release of the hormone insulin.

Forty minutes later, all the caffeine is absorbed. As a result, blood pressure rises, the liver dumps even more sugar into the bloodstream and pupils dilate.

Forty five minutes later, dopamine production occurs in the body. This hormone gives you a sensation of pleasure. This reaction is similar to how the body responds to heroin.

After 60 minutes, a sugar crash occurs. The caffeine slowly wears off and you can experience mood changes, lethargy, fatigue and mental fogginess.


Why are energy drinks viewed as so unsafe?



It is difficult to predict how energy drinks will affect different individuals, especially with underlying heart issues or in combination with other substances containing alcohol or caffeine.

Oftentimes, individuals do not know they have a cardiac problem until something fatal occurs. For this reason, it is better to be safe than sorry when choosing how to get some extra pep to get through the day.

Despite what we do not know with certainty, the American Academy of Pediatrics has a very clear opinion of energy drink usage in children and teens. Given the observed side effects, including irregular heartbeats and blood pressure changes, the AAP recommends that children and teens should not consume energy drinks at all. 3



How to pep up without excessive caffeine


You can successfully and healthily boost energy levels in many ways that are safer than consuming copious amounts of stimulants.

Exercise regularly and participate in activities to reduce stress. 

Be mindful of your diet. Reduce sugar and increase your intake of omega-3 fatty acids found in plants, seeds, fish and nuts.

Rest! Be sure to get 7-8 hours of quality rest each night.

Through safely managing your diet and routine, it is possible to achieve greater energy levels that do not involve risky habits.

 

Sources

1 KUTV. Gould, Cynthia. 16 Apr. 2018. 16-year-old’s death linked to energy drink, caffeine products.

2 Cleveland Heart Lab.13 Dec. 2018. Can Energy Drinks Harm Your Heart?

3 American Academy of Pediatrics. Energy Drinks.

 

Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

elderly pain with arthritis walking with cane

Daily Knee Exercises for Arthritis Pain

When you struggle with knee pain from arthritis, you know the effort it takes just to complete normal daily activity. From swelling to stiffness- the last thing you want to do is move. However, knee pain from arthritis can be lessened with the help of exercise.

 

How Arthritis Affects the Knees

 

The ends of the bones that meet in the knee joint are covered with cartilage. This cartilage provides cushioning and protection to the bones as you move. The knee also has the meniscus between the thigh and shin bone. The meniscus protects the cartilage.

When someone has arthritis, the cartilage wears down over time. As the bones rub together, they create friction on the joints. This may lead to bone spurs, swelling and stiffness. Bending and straightening the knee with arthritis is difficult.

The meniscus can wear down too. According to Dr. Johnson, Orthopedic Surgeon at CCMH, The meniscus is like a brake pad on your car.  “It won’t last forever, “ said Dr. Johnson. “The number of cycles you put on it cause wear and tear. It may not be able to protect cartilage as well as it could before it was worn out.” A tear in your meniscus or other injury to your knee can damage or cause additional wear, which can predispose you to knee osteoarthritis earlier than you would with the normal aging process.”

Knee arthritis is not uncommon. It usually starts at  50 years of age and older.

 


Using Exercise to Help Knee Arthritis


Exercises for arthritis including aerobics and strength exercises can reduce symptoms, increase balance, add joint motion and function, and aid in weight control.

“Your body relies on muscles to help motor joints,”  stated Dr. Johnson. “For the knee, that’s the quadriceps in the front of the thigh and hamstrings in the back. You can’t cure arthritis or make it go away, but if you strengthen the muscles that support and stabilize the knee, you can take some of the stress load of weight-bearing or walking off a joint that’s worn out and weakened from arthritis, and place it on the stronger muscle.”

 

Things to Consider Before  Exercising with Knee Arthritis


It is always advisable to discuss a new exercise program with your physician. A doctor or physical therapist can help you choose a program that is safe, helps you gain strength, and won’t increase inflammation and joint pain. If you’ve had knee surgery, get guidance from your doctor or physical therapist on what knee exercises are safe for you.

 

Joint Protection Tips

Commit to doing a little exercise each day


Dr. Johnson suggests trying to stay active even when arthritis flares up. Simple range-of-motion stretches may actually help reduce pain.

 


Begin slowly


If you do too much too fast, your muscles may be overworked and joint pain worsened. Slowly increase in exercise intensity and length as you progress.

 


Start with gentle stretches

“When beginning any activity, start with five minutes or 10 minutes of stretching to help elongate the muscles and make them easier to move,”  Dr. Johnson said. “And do it again at the end. Don’t force any stretches; keep your movements slow and easy. With strength training, begin with fewer reps or lower weight, and build up gradually.”

Listen to your body


If your joints start to ache or you experience new joint pain, stop. Discuss with your doctor to learn what pain is normal. Some discomfort may be normal, but your doctor can help you identify pain that is more serious.

 


Exercises to Relieve Knee Pain from Arthritis

 

Dr. Johnson recommended these knee exercises:

 

Hamstring Stretch


This exercise stretches the back of your thigh and behind your knee.

While lying on the floor with both legs bent and feet on the ground, lift one leg off the floor and bring the knee toward your chest. Put your hands behind your thigh below your knee. (You may also loop a towel around your thigh and grasp the end, if it is easier.)
Straighten your leg and pull it toward your head gently until you feel a stretch.
Hold the stretch for 30 to 60 seconds.
Repeat the sequence one or two more times on each leg.
Don’t put your hands (or towel) at your knee joint and pull.

Quadricep Stretch

 

This exercise stretches the front of your thigh.

Stand behind a chair or next to a wall. Hold on for balance.
Bend one knee. Bring your heel up toward your buttock.
Hold onto your ankle and gently pull your heel closer to your body.
Hold this stretch for 30 to 60 seconds.
Repeat the sequence one or two more times on each leg.
Be sure to not arch or twist your back while stretching.

 


Straight-Leg Raises


This exercise strengthens the front of your thigh.

While lying on the floor with your elbows directly under your shoulders to support your upper body, keep your neck and shoulders relaxed.
Place your leg with the affected knee in front of you while straight. Bend the other leg so your foot is flat on the floor.
Tighten the thigh muscle of the straight leg. Then, slowly raise it 6 to 10 inches off the floor.
Hold this position for 5 seconds. Then, relax and bring your leg to the floor. Repeat for three sets of 10.

Dr. Johnson suggests trying  this exercise while you watch your favorite TV show. Start with five reps at every commercial until you get to 30. Then, gradually work your way up to 50, and 100. As it becomes easier, you can slowly increase the resistance by adding ankle weights. Slowly increase them by one pound increments.


Slow “March”


This exercise strengthens stabilizing muscles of your foot, knee, and hip.

Stand next to a wall or door frame for support.
While you balance on your right foot, hold on to the wall or door frame to stay steady if needed.
Keep your knee straight over your ankle, slightly bent.
Slowly lift your left foot until your knee is level with your hip. If you cannot quite get there, get as close to that position as you can without pain.
Slowly lower your foot back to the floor. Then, repeat with the other foot.
Repeat as many times as you can, while in correct position.

 


Bodyweight Squat


This exercise helps strengthen thighs and buttocks.

Stand with your feet shoulder-distance apart, or a little wider.
If needed, hold on to something stable, like the back of sturdy chair or kitchen sink.
Keep your chest lifted and shift your weight back into your heels while slowly pushing your hips back, as is you were sitting down into a chair.
Keep your feet flat and lower yourself as far as you’re comfortable (such as a quarter or halfway down to where a chair would be).
Push through your heels and bring your body back up to standing.
Repeat the sequence three times.

Sit-and-Stand


This exercise increases range of motion and strengthens the back of the thigh and buttocks.

Stand in front of a sturdy chair that won’t move. A table in front of you can help with support, if needed.
Stand with your feet planted on the floor and hip-distance apart.
Press your buttocks and hips back first. Then, bend your knees and slowly lower yourself to a seated position.
Hold the table, if needed, to keep you from falling back into the chair.
Tip forward at the hips.

Push through your feet up with your legs into a standing position.
Repeat three times, gradually building up to more reps.




If your arthritis pain is debilitating, please reach out to CCMH Orthopedics by visiting http://www.ccmhhealth.com/orthopedics/.

 

Disclaimer


The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.


While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma

Cancer Centers Receive ONCC Employer Recognition Award

The Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma has been selected as the 2019 Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation Small Employer Recognition Award recipient. They were chosen from among the best in the country as a shining example of oncology nursing at it finest. The award will be presented on Friday, April 12, during the Recognition Breakfast for Oncology Certified Nurses at the ONS Annual Conference in Anaheim, California.

woman_standing_in_field

Coping with Endometriosis

March is National Endometriosis Awareness Month! If a doctor has diagnosed you with endometriosis, you know how painful experiencing this condition can be. However, we have a few tips you can try to help minimize your discomfort and not let endometriosis get in the way of enjoying your life!

 

What is endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis is a disorder that affects 200 million women worldwide. 1 When a woman has endometriosis, tissue that behave like the lining of the uterus grow outside the uterus. This tissue grows in various places including the fallopian tubes, pelvic lining, ovaries, and in or around the bowel and bladder.

 

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

 

Painful cramps and periods
Periods that are long
Heavy menstrual flow
Nausea and/or vomiting
Pain during sex
Infertility
Bowel and urinary disorders
Chronic fatigue

 

Managing endometriosis

 

Your  physician may recommend various medications and treatments for endometriosis. However, there are some things you can do yourself to help better manage your condition.

 

Diet

 

Add more fruits and vegetables to your diet and minimize your red meat intake. Some studies indicate that increased red meat consumption may greatly increase your chance of suffering from endometriosis while fruits and vegetables can help reduce your chances.  Consuming omega-3 fatty acids found in fish such as  mackerel, sardines, salmon and anchovies can also help.

 

Manage stress

 

Cortisol is a hormone involved in the stress response. Prolonged stress can lead to elevated cortisol levels, a hormone which may decrease progesterone levels. This hormonal imbalance may aggravate endometriosis.

 

Apply Heat

 

A warm bath or heating pad placed on the lower abdomen can help to relax cramping pelvic muscles and reduce pain. Many women may find using heat as effective as pain relievers.

 

Pelvic massage


Some women find relief when being treated by a massage therapist. Massage therapy can help reduce menstruation pain associated with endometriosis. Massaging the pelvic area, including parts of the abdomen, back and sides  shortly before the menstrual period begins is the most beneficial time to seek massage treatment.

 

Rest

 

Especially during menstruation, sufferers of endometriosis should get more rest. Lying on the side with the knees pulled to the chest can help reduce pain and pressure in the back.

 

Exercise

 

Regular exercise helps to release endorphins, the “feel good” hormones that reduce pain. Exercise can also help to lower estrogen levels and improve symptoms.

 

Manage Nausea

 

When pain related to endometriosis is at its worst, women may experience nausea. Ginger is often used to help nausea. Many women drink ginger tea or eat ginger chews.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of endometriosis or need help coping with your endometriosis diagnosis, make an appointment with one of our providers at MMG Gynecology and Obstetrics.

 

Sources

 

1 Endometriosis Foundation of America. What Is Endometriosis? Causes, Symptoms and Treatments.


Disclaimer

The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.

While content is frequently updated, medical information changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Candice White Recieves Daisy Award

Candice White, LPN – CARE Coordinator, Receives Daisy Award

The CARE team is proud to present the Daisy Award to Candice White, LPN. The Silver Linings team nominated Candice for her many kind and considerate deeds toward patients. She loves to spend time and talk with her patients. The patients say they enjoy Candice. Specifically, one patient says she’s grateful for Candice. The patient was expressing her desire to go home, but she didn’t have the essentials required to go at the time. Candice discovered the patient did have a home and worked on taking the steps to help set up her utilities again and automatic monthly payments for her living expenses. Candice also called the patient’s local church to assist with getting the patient food and helped start the process for her to receive food stamps. The Silver Linings team says the patient’s discharge plans were to go to a shelter, but over a three day period Candice changed that individual’s life by giving them hope! Candice was relentless in her efforts and her tireless work allowed a patient to go back home. Candice has a true patient focused attitude and we are proud to have her as part of our team.

Anxiety and Heart Disease

Is anxiety a contributing factor to heart disease? Can it also deter recovering from heart related issues? Many doctors believe so. If you suffer from anxiety, it is important to do all you can to manage your anxiety to prevent other health problems also. However, if you suffer from heart disease, dealing with this condition may cause anxiety as well.

 

How anxiety affects the heart


When someone experiences anxiety, the body’s reactions may also cause extra strain on the heart. Therefore, anxiety can be especially harmful to those diagnosed with cardiac disease.

The following cardiac risk factors and heart disorders may be caused by anxiety :

 

Decreased heart rate variability – Heart rate variability is the variation in the time interval between heartbeats. Even if your heart beats 60 beats per minute, that does not necessarily mean it beats every single second. It is normal to have some variation in how often the beats occur. Decreased heart rate variability may increase someone’s risk of death after an acute heart attack.

 

Tachycardia- This is rapid heart rate. In some serious cases, it interferes with normal heart function, increasing the risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

 

Increased blood pressure – Chronic high blood pressure can lead to coronary disease. Coronary disease weakens the heart muscle and may also cause heart failure.

 

 

Heart attack and anxiety

 

Dealing with anxiety after a heart attack can be difficult. It is natural to react to this life-altering event in ways that are similar to post-traumatic stress disorder. However, it is important for patients to visit with their doctor if the anxiety does not improve over time.

Someone who has a heart attack may:

 

  • be shocked by this near-death experience and afraid to participate in activities that they once did.
  • struggle with reliving the event, and also avoid the activity or place where it occurred.
  • feel negative and uncertain about their future.
  • have difficulty sleeping.

 

Furthermore, after a heart attack, many individuals may have a difficult time completing tasks essential to their recovery and a healthy lifestyle due to their anxiety. Some of these problems may include:

 

  • not taking  prescribed medications
  • not following prescribed exercise regimens
  • disconnecting from friends and family
  • inability to confidently resume their career and family responsibilities
  • not following a healthy diet

 

Some anxiety disorders may affect heart health

 

Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD) – Patients  with OCD manage their unreasonable thoughts and worries by performing the same actions over and over. For example, a person obsessed with perceived cardiovascular symptoms may be concerned that their anxiety disorder is really a heart problem. The symptoms do after all mimic a heart condition.


Panic disorder – Panic attacks are sometimes believed to initially be heart attacks. Sufferers will feel terror, agitation, chest pains, stomach discomfort, dizziness, shortness of breath, and also have rapid heart rates.


Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – PTSD follows a shocking or frightening incident or sudden, life-threatening event. This may include a violent crime, major accident, or heart attack. Those who suffer from PTSD often have trouble dealing with anything associated with the incident that caused their anxiety.

 

 


Panic attack or heart attack?

 

It can be difficult to determine if a patient is suffering from anxiety or heart problems without proper treatment. A patient that suffers from chest pain—even if under the care of a physician for anxiety— should go to the emergency room. Blood tests can indicate heart muscle enzymes present due to a heart attack.

A cardiologist that is sensitive to anxiety issues will know how to sort out panic attack symptoms from heart attack symptoms and can also refer patients as needed if anxiety is the issue.

 

If you are having difficulty dealing with anxiety, please make an appointment with one of our providers. They would love to help you take charge of your life again. You can find a list of them at http://www.ccmhhealth.com/providers/.

 

Disclaimer


The Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not provide specific medical advice for individual cases. Comanche County Memorial Hospital does not endorse any medical or professional services obtained through information provided on this site, articles on the site or any links on this site.

 

Use of the information obtained by the Comanche County Memorial Hospital website does not replace medical advice given by a qualified medical provider to meet the medical needs of our readers or others.


While content is frequently updated, medical information also changes quickly. Information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies or typographical errors. For questions or concerns, please contact us at contact@ccmhhealth.com.

Brandon Adams – 1st Quarter MTN&RC RBC Rising Star

Brandon Adams works in the engineering department at McMahon Tomlinson Nursing & Rehabilitation Center. He is consistently friendly and available to others. His peers describe him as honest and hard working. Our residents and patients love Brandon. He is always friendly toward them and very helpful.

During Christmas Brandon heard of two co-workers’ families in need. He provided two full Christmas meals for those families. He did this very quietly and respectfully. We would have never known about this thoughtful deed if not for one of the family members. Brandon is truly an asset to McMahon Tomlinson Nursing & Rehabilitation Center and is an example for all.

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